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Your Language's Phrases  
User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Posted (12 years 7 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 942 times:

Does your language/country have any special sayings that are unique to other languages/countries?

Ex:

England (you know what I mean): "Taking the Mickey"
French(?): "Se la vie" ("such is life")



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 1, posted (12 years 7 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 928 times:

Oops, forgot:

USA: "Mid-life crisis"



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineLubcha132 From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 2776 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (12 years 7 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 924 times:

the british one must be Cockney
Mickey-Mouse...house?


User currently offlineAviatsiya From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (12 years 7 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 925 times:

Strine is a completely different language to English; but I'm not going to sit here and type out a full dictionary. Try searching on google.

User currently offlineAirontario From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 550 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (12 years 7 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 909 times:

Canadian : Eh!

User currently offlineLewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3623 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (12 years 7 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 898 times:

It is "C'est la vie" in french.

In greek: "kanei ton kinezo", translation: "pretend to be chinese. We say that to someone that has done something bad and pretends to have full ignorance about it.



User currently offlineTurbolet From Cape Verde, joined Nov 2007, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (12 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 882 times:

In Maltese:
"X' affarijiet dawn!"
Must be said a particular way to get its full effect, hard to explain. It literally means "What kind of things are these!" (i.e. said when someone is very annoyed at a person, company, etc.)
-turbolet


User currently offlineGanymed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 854 times:

You often hear french people say :
"C´est dur la vie d´artiste " or
"C´est dur la culture" transl.: "It´s a hard life"

From Italy,I´ve heard this one:
"Chi va piano va lontano" transl.:"Go carefully and you´ll succeed"

German:
"Ohne Fleiss kein Preis" transl.:"No effort-no success"

Luxemburgish:
"D´ass eng elle Welt" transl.:"It´s a bad world"

"Décke Gaas" transl.:"it rocks"

"Egal waat" transl.:"it sucks"

 Big thumbs up  Big thumbs up

Regards


User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 835 times:

An englishman told me the phrase of "Taking the Mickey of the Queen" (making fun of her)


Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlinePHX-LJU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 828 times:

Lewis,

In Slovene, it's "Delaj se Francoza" ("Pretend to be French"). It means the same thing.


User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 822 times:

I noticed that most people in Canada say 'for sure' at the end of a sentance  Laugh out loud

User currently offlinePendrilsaint From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 685 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 817 times:

Hmm...in the southern US..."Doesnt that just beat all" and adding "Lord Willing" to the end of sentences in which you state what you are going to do are common...Oh!! and of course whenever someone does something stupid you can say "Bless their heart"...that phrase basically lets you say anything about someone and it will still seem nice...such as..."She is as dumb as a rock...bless her heart."=)

User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 12, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 801 times:

There are loads of differences across the English speaking world, and lots of opportunity for misunderstanding:

"Pissed" - UK, Australia - Drunk, US - Angry

"Rubber" - UK - eraser, US - well....

"Fag" - UK - cigarette, US - homosexual

Hence the baffled looks when a Brit in America says he's going to the shops to pick up some fags and a rubber!

I always loved the story during a film when an American director told Richard Burton to grab Elizabeth Taylor's fanny. He did what he thought he'd been told and the footage, whilst apparently highly entertaining, ended up on the cutting room floor. Note for Americans, in Britain, the fanny is round the front!



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlinePendrilsaint From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 685 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 787 times:

In the UK doesnt "Knocking them up" mean basically waking someone up...such as in a hotel..or other place?...While in the US it means...well..heh..you know

User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13186 posts, RR: 77
Reply 14, posted (12 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 785 times:

'Knocked up' also describes getting pregnant in the UK.
I always thought that 'Wanker', a British term of abuse meaning masturbator, was unique to the UK.
When I first went to the US, I just had to look in the local phone directory in the hotel room, sure enough some poor sod had that surname. Wouldn't happen here!
'Sod' by the way is short for sodomiser, used as abuse and a term, like if your fed up with something, 'sod this!'
Also 'Bugger', short for buggery, like sod in it's useage.
'Bollocks' is slang for testicles, also like 'Balls' in useage.
Oh well, we did also give the world Shakesphere!


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