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Ever Had Raclette?  
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12214 posts, RR: 35
Posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2060 times:
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So I was reading Civ-Av, and came across this:

Better Than A Raclette-Swiss Sky Thread 9! (by RootsAir May 9 2007 in Civil Aviation)

This made me think back to Norway, where I've had raclette a few times. I might just buy one of those griddles as it is damn good and can be very healthy  Smile




911, where is your emergency?
61 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineNWADC9 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4896 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2055 times:

Very innovative. Never heard of such a thing, but I bet it'd be a big hit at parties!  Smile


Flying an aeroplane with only a single propeller to keep you in the air. Can you imagine that? -Capt. Picard
User currently offlineJJJ From Spain, joined May 2006, 1788 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2047 times:

I bought one of those thingies the first time I went to Geneva, there's raclette available here in both Auchan and Carrefour so we have a go at it every two months or so.

Raw raclette cheese smells awful, but the stink goes when it melts. Ah, those clever Swiss Big grin


User currently offlinePipoA380 From Switzerland, joined May 2005, 1594 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2042 times:
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Raclette? Never heard of it!

Here's on I happened to picture, back in 2005:
http://www.petitcomite.ch/html/internet/051231nouvelan/100_0052.jpg
http://www.petitcomite.ch/html/internet/051231nouvelan/100_0038.jpg

And here's my PERSONAL recipe. Get the melted chese right on top of that!
http://www.petitcomite.ch/html/internet/051231nouvelan/100_0051.jpg

Hmmm!!!!!!

[Edited 2007-05-09 18:46:20]


It's not about AIRBUS. it's not about BOEING. It's all about the beauty of FLYING.
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12214 posts, RR: 35
Reply 4, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2024 times:
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Never tried it with the real Swiss cheese, but only with mozzarella. Grill the chicken, pork, beef on top, along with various vegetables, pour the cheese over, and yum yum.


911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineCarmenlu15 From Guatemala, joined Dec 2004, 4756 posts, RR: 31
Reply 5, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2023 times:

 drool   drool   drool 

Ok guys, for the next support meet let's get Phil to cook...



What do I know, I'm just an 'immature troublemaker with only a passing interest in aviation' (or so they say)
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12214 posts, RR: 35
Reply 6, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2018 times:
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Quoting PipoA380 (Reply 3):
And here's my PERSONAL recipe. Get the melted chese right on top of that!

I recognize the onions, but what is the other stuff?  Smile



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3299 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2009 times:
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Quoting PipoA380 (Reply 3):
Here's on I happened to picture, back in 2005:

Oh man. It makes me want raclette so badly! Had it three times in one week during Spring Break this year in Switzerland. Une bonne religieuse, s'il vous plait!

Quoting KaiGywer (Thread starter):
This made me think back to Norway, where I've had raclette a few times.

That's like combining grillade and raclette. Looks tempting, but I'd put meat up there instead of vegetables. Maybe some nice veal sausage, and some pork. mmmmmm.

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 6):

I recognize the onions, but what is the other stuff?

Potatoes, cornichons (small, sour pickles for our American friends), and pepper.

My cousin eats raclette with ketchup. It's not terrible, but kind of odd.

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
User currently offlinePipoA380 From Switzerland, joined May 2005, 1594 posts, RR: 51
Reply 8, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2006 times:
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Quoting Carmenlu15 (Reply 5):
Ok guys, for the next support meet let's get Phil to cook...

Waiting for you guys to come!! I'll set the table in the meantime!

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 4):
Never tried it with the real Swiss cheese, but only with mozzarella. Grill the chicken, pork, beef on top, along with various vegetables, pour the cheese over, and yum yum.

Damn, Kai! That's not raclette, that's what you guys THINK is raclette! Real raclette is with potatoes! Come on over here and I'll show ya!

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 6):
I recognize the onions, but what is the other stuff? Smile



Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 7):
Potatoes, cornichons (small, sour pickles for our American friends), and pepper.

You almost got it Tis, you just missed the powdered garlic!!  goodvibes 



It's not about AIRBUS. it's not about BOEING. It's all about the beauty of FLYING.
User currently offlineChachu201 From New Zealand, joined Apr 2006, 857 posts, RR: 17
Reply 9, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1995 times:

Nah nah nah, boys, all of your recipes are rubbish! What you want is my mums Raclette Pie.... mmmmmmmmmm...

Its potatoes, with raclette, olives and a little onion, all in a puff pastry case. Tasty!


User currently offlineCarmenlu15 From Guatemala, joined Dec 2004, 4756 posts, RR: 31
Reply 10, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1988 times:

Quoting Chachu201 (Reply 9):
Its potatoes, with raclette, olives and a little onion, all in a puff pastry case. Tasty!

 grumpy  You're all fired for making me hungry...



What do I know, I'm just an 'immature troublemaker with only a passing interest in aviation' (or so they say)
User currently offlineChachu201 From New Zealand, joined Apr 2006, 857 posts, RR: 17
Reply 11, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1983 times:

Quoting Carmenlu15 (Reply 10):
You're all fired for making me hungry...



User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9523 posts, RR: 42
Reply 12, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1974 times:

Quoting PipoA380 (Reply 3):
Here's on I happened to picture, back in 2005:

Now, that's more what I think of as raclette but I really don't like heaps of melted cheese so I may not have been paying attention. Makes me feel like  vomit  just looking at it but everyone else seems to love it, so... biggrin 


User currently offlineSkyGourmet From Germany, joined Jun 2006, 121 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1962 times:

I had raclette a few times . The problem is the whole house smells like burnt cheese for a few days afterwards .

[Edited 2007-05-09 19:51:03]


Meine dispatcher says there's something wrong mit deine Kabel?
User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 14, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1945 times:

Quoting SkyGourmet (Reply 13):
a few times

I never had raclette and cheese fondue only twice. I prefer to have this one as a nice alternative :
-
Fondue Bourguignonne, Beef Fondue
-

Tender, thinly-sliced pieces of beef are cooked in a combination of butter and cooking oil then dipped in flavourful sauces.

I N G R E D I E N T S
3 pound piece boneless beef sirloin or tenderloin
Cooking oil (canola or other vegetable oil)
Butter

I N S T R U C T I O N S
Trim the fat from the mean; cut into bit-size cubes. Keep refrigerated until 20 minutes before cooking. (Meat can be marinated, try this recipe for Sesame Soy Marinade for Beef Fondue)

Fill a metal fondue pot about 1/2 full with half oil and half butter (you can use oil only, if you prefer). Heat the oil/butter on the stove until is about 360 degrees. If you are using the butter and oil combination then heat slowly until the butter bubbles and the mixture turns a golden color.

Set the fondue pot on the stand over a moderately high direct heat and maintain the heat.

To Serve:
Each guest spears a cube of beef with a fondue fork, holds it in the hot oil until cooked to the desired doneness usually 1 to 3 minutes. Dip in good sauces like this one.

Sour Cream Mustard Sauce
1/2 pint sour cream
1/2 mayonnaise
1/4 cup prepared mustard
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
Dash of Hot Pepper Sauce, such as Tabasco

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
and an alternative recipe :
-
2 pounds fillet steak
Vegetable oil
Curried Chutney Sauce, recipe follows
Bearnaise Sauce, recipe follows
Barbecue Sauce, recipe follows

Cut the steak into 3/4-inch cubes and arrange on platter. Fill a fondue pot half full with vegetable oil. Heat on stove and transfer to burner. To serve, the meat is picked up with fondue fork and immersed into hot oil until cooked to desired doneness. Once cooked, the meat is dipped into accompanying sauces.

Curried Chutney Sauce:
1/2 cup plain yogurt, drained in cheesecloth
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup mango chutney, drained and chopped
1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons toasted curry powder
2 tablespoons minced red onion
1/4 teaspoon cayenne toasted

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and pulse 2 or 3 times. Adjust seasoning. Chill the sauce, covered, for at least 2 hours and up to 3 days. Transfer the sauce to a serving dish.
Yield: 1 1/2 cups

Bearnaise Sauce:
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon minced shallots
1 tablespoon dried tarragon
3 egg yolks
Salt and pepper
1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted in saucepan
2 tablespoons minced fresh tarragon

In a small saucepan combine vinegar, wine, shallots, and dried tarragon and simmer over moderate heat until reduced to 2 tablespoons of liquid. Cool and strain through a fine sieve.
In the top of a double boiler or a heatproof bowl, whisk the egg yolks until they become thick and sticky. Whisk in the reduced vinegar mixture, salt, and pepper. Place the pan or bowl over a saucepan of simmering, not boiling, water. Whisk until mixture is warm, about 2 minutes. (If mixture appears to become lumpy, dip pan immediately in a bowl of ice water to cool, whisk until smooth and then continue recipe.) The yolk mixture has thickened enough when you can see the bottom of the pan between strokes and mixture forms a light cream on the wires of the whip.
While whisking the yolk mixture, gradually pour in the melted butter, a tablespoon or so at a time whisking thoroughly to incorporate before adding more butter. As the mixture begins to thicken and become creamy, the butter can be added more rapidly. Do not add the milk solids at the bottom of the melted butter.
Season the sauce, to taste, with fresh tarragon, salt, and pepper. To keep the sauce warm, set the pan or bowl in lukewarm water or in a thermos.
Yield: 1 to 1 1/2 cups

Barbecue sauce:
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
3 tablespoons onion, finely minced
1 garlic clove, finely minced
2 cups chili sauce
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons water
Pinch red pepper flakes
Salt

In a medium saucepan heat oil. Add onions and garlic and saute until softened. Add rest of the ingredients and cook at a simmer for about 15 minutes. Thin out with water if necessary.
Yield: 2 cups

Wine Suggestions: White Wines: Fendant; Sancerre; Pouilly Fume Red Wines: Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais, chilled
-
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-

-
-----------------------------
you might decide in favour of the "Fondue Chinoise" :
--
A general rule when serving hot pot is to keep the broth bland and the dips spicy. The beauty of this combination is that it allows guests to season the food according to their own taste. On the other hand, there are no hard and fast rules. Feel free to adapt the basic broth recipe as desired.
INGREDIENTS:
* 1 - 1 1/2 pounds flank steak
* 6 cups water
* 2 packages beef bouillion
* 2 tablespoons white wine
* 2 tablespoons soy sauce
* 1 green onion
* 2 slices ginger
* Optional - White Pepper, one turn of the pepper mill

PREPARATION:
Cut the beef into paper thin rectangular slices. (Freeze the beef for 1 -2 hours to make cutting easier, or ask the butcher to cut it for you).

Prepare the side dishes (see suggested list below), washing and draining the vegetables.
If using in the fondue, cut the mushrooms into bite-sized pieces. Shred the lettuce or chop as desired.

Lay the beef and side dishes on separate platters on the table. Place the dipping sauces on the table in small individual bowls.

Make sure each guest has a complete place setting, including a dipping fork (color-coded if possible) and a small bowl for placing the cooked food.

Combine the water and beef bouillion and bring to a boil. Turn down to a simmer and add the white wine, soy sauce, green onion, and ginger. Transfer enough broth so that the fondue pot is approximately 2/3 - 3/4 full. (How much broth you need will depend on the size of the fondue pot).

Place the fondue pot on the burner, and keep it simmering throughout the meal. Keep the remaining broth warming on the stovetop.

Use dipping forks to cook the food in the hot broth, and then dip in the sauces as desired.

Suggested Side Dishes (to be enjoyed as is or cooked in the broth if desired):
baby corn
fresh mushrooms
bean thread noodles (cook them in the broth at the end of the meal)
lettuce
Mango Chutney
It's not traditional, but you can also serve crusty bread for dunking in the broth, or try this recipe for Ox-tongue Biscuits

Suggested Dips:
Soy sauce, Soy with Ginger Dressing, Sesame Paste, preserved bean curd, Hot Mustard, Chili Oil, Peanut Sauce, or your favorite hot sauce
-


User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12214 posts, RR: 35
Reply 15, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1933 times:
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Seems the entire Support crew is hungry Big grin


911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineMaverickM11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 17339 posts, RR: 46
Reply 16, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1918 times:

I luuuuuuuuuurve cheese...especially stinky cheese, and Raclette certainly satisfies. It's no Epoisses but I love it nonetheless.

Quoting KaiGywer (Thread starter):
and can be very healthy

...when Raclette isn't involved Wink

Quoting KaiGywer (Thread starter):
This made me think back to Norway, where I've had raclette a few times

Raclette? En Norvege? Comment?



E pur si muove -Galileo
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12214 posts, RR: 35
Reply 17, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1914 times:
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Quoting MaverickM11 (Reply 16):

...when Raclette isn't involved

Hehe, true if you're talking about the cheese  Smile Raclette is a name for the whole meal also though  Wink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raclette

Quoting MaverickM11 (Reply 16):

Raclette? En Norvege? Comment?

First time I had it, but not with Raclette-cheese  Smile



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9523 posts, RR: 42
Reply 18, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1901 times:

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 17):
Quoting MaverickM11 (Reply 16):

...when Raclette isn't involved

Hehe, true if you're talking about the cheese Raclette is a name for the whole meal also though

So what is a fondue?

 confused 


User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3299 posts, RR: 13
Reply 19, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1885 times:
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Quoting David L (Reply 18):
So what is a fondue?

Traditional "Fondue" is a pot of melted cheese in which you dip (usually) bread. Other stuff can be substituted, but bread is what you see most often. "Fondue" means melted.

There's also other types of fondue like Fondue Bourguignonne (beef dunked in oil) though there is nothing technically melted in that.

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12214 posts, RR: 35
Reply 20, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1873 times:
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Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 19):
Traditional "Fondue" is a pot of melted cheese in which you dip (usually) bread. Other stuff can be substituted, but bread is what you see most often. "Fondue" means melted.

There's also other types of fondue like Fondue Bourguignonne (beef dunked in oil) though there is nothing technically melted in that.

The fondue I know is cooking oil in which you dip speared meats and veggies.



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9523 posts, RR: 42
Reply 21, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1864 times:

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 19):
Quoting David L (Reply 18):
So what is a fondue?

Traditional "Fondue" is a pot of melted cheese in which you dip (usually) bread. Other stuff can be substituted, but bread is what you see most often. "Fondue" means melted.

There's also other types of fondue like Fondue Bourguignonne (beef dunked in oil) though there is nothing technically melted in that.

It was really a rhetorical question. I thought the picture in the opening post was more like a fondue (things to dip in melted cheese) and the picture PipoA380 posted was raclette (melting cheese and scraping it on to things) but it seems not to be that simple.

There was a small, cheapish restaurant in Geneva, possibly at the junction of Rue de Vermont and Rue de Montbrillant, that did a great Chinese fondue. It's still there but I don't know if it's the same management and/or menu as it's been a few years since I last ate there.


User currently offlineLH459 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 886 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1863 times:

MMMMMM, Raclette!

Of course, that's winter food, and it's definitely not winter here in sunny California. Still looks good, though! When I was a boy, my mum preferred to make Raclette with Appenzeller cheese instead of Raclette cheese. I like it either way, but I'm also partial to Appenzeller. I'm sure some Swiss purists would be horrified!  stirthepot 

Quoting Chachu201 (Reply 9):
Its potatoes, with raclette, olives and a little onion, all in a puff pastry case. Tasty!

Sounds like heaven to me, I'll be sure to try that next winter!



"I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is temporary; the evil it does is permanent" - Ghandi
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12214 posts, RR: 35
Reply 23, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1859 times:
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FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting LH459 (Reply 22):
Of course, that's winter food, and it's definitely not winter here in sunny California.

Is it ever?  Smile



(No, 70 degrees does not count as winter  Silly)



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9523 posts, RR: 42
Reply 24, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1852 times:

Quoting KaiGywer (Reply 20):
The fondue I know is cooking oil in which you dip speared meats and veggies

The fondues I thought I knew involve dipping bread, meat, veg, etc, into hot oil, boiling stock or cheese.

Quoting LH459 (Reply 22):
instead of Raclette cheese

OK, is it the type of cheese that determines whether or not it's raclette or is it the style of preparation/cooking/eating?

Basically, what's the difference between fondue and raclette?

Edit: typo

[Edited 2007-05-09 22:53:00]

25 Post contains links and images PipoA380 : Fondue is usually made with Gruyères cheese and Vacherin cheese, half of each (moitié-moitié is the name, which means half-half). It is melt
26 MaverickM11 : Oooh I thought it was only the name for the cheese and that's just how you serve it....although it's good at room temperature too. Raclette is straig
27 Post contains images Carmenlu15 : Can we fire Kai for that? There's a Swiss restaurant just across the street from the office, and another a couple of blocks away... will have to chec
28 Post contains images David L : Thanks - exactly what I thought! It was the opening post of this thread that confused me. Well, it's his fault I got confused.
29 Post contains images Carmenlu15 : Quesadillas? That's it, none of our customers should go through that. Kai, you're fired!
30 Post contains images PipoA380 : That's a good reason to have him fired!
31 MaverickM11 : Lol no! It's algo de queso or queso fundido or something like that.
32 Post contains images Carmenlu15 : ANY reason is a good reason... Hmm... I had something like that at a Mexican restaurant recently and it was called "choriqueso" (cheese and chorizo).
33 Post contains images David L : Oops! Sorry, mate! Still, at least I achieved something today.
34 Post contains images SandroZRH : Raclette is awesome, but having it about once a month is more than enought. They serve raclette in Norway??? wtf?
35 Post contains images PipoA380 : A relief for the whole a.net community! What an achievment!!
36 Post contains images CastleIsland : I always use sherry and nutmeg in my fondue.
37 Post contains links and images MaverickM11 : It'm pretty sure it's Queso Fundido...and it's muy rico.
38 Post contains images Airdolomiti : I had that just a couple of weeks ago at a friend's - quite simply delicious!
39 Post contains images David L : Ah, like a Swiss Donner. I don't know the story but it sounds as if the needs of the many...
40 Post contains images KaiGywer : Salsa con Queso? A bunch of comedians aren't we Well, the kind of raclette I tried to explain Not the cheese (as far as I know..I'm sure you can get
41 Post contains images Aloges : Knowing what you Norwegians let pass as food, you'd just as well make Raclette with Brunost.
42 Post contains images LH459 : That's LA weather you're describing there. I live in the Bay Area, and believe it or not we do have wet, cold winters here. Raclette is a nice meal w
43 KaiGywer : That would be good if you were pouring it over reindeer or other wild animals.
44 Post contains images MaverickM11 : No...that is Velveeta
45 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : sorry, but what is a "Swiss Doener" ?? -
46 Post contains images SRforever : Funny story: One of my work colleagues decided to invite us all for lunch as a farewell instead of the typical aperitif. So what did she do, she broug
47 Post contains images PipoA380 : Nothing's worth the great smell and taste of a raclette when you're eating it. But the smell after... Yuck! When at home, I usually make a round in t
48 Post contains images David L : As in Donner (spelling varies from place to place) kebab. It was just a reference to permanently heating a chunk of something and continually scrapin
49 ME AVN FAN : the spelling changes because the ö in Capital writing and in many languages canNOT be typed, so that it either becomes "o" or "oe", but it always
50 Post contains images David L : It also changes in countries that don't speak German - we have our own spelling, thanks. Fair enough.
51 ME AVN FAN : - Döner is Turkish and NOT German, and so the word should whenever possible be spelled in Turkish. The Turks in fact took over the ö and ü a
52 David L : In English, it is always spelled with an "o". We do NOT have umlauts.
53 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : of course, as in most languages. But it is not a different spelling, only two missing dots
54 Post contains links and images Francoflier : Yeah, yeah, raclette and fondues (both cheese and meat fondues) are good, but for me the kind of European mountain food is...... ............ TARTIFLE
55 Post contains images Carmenlu15 : Ahh, gotcha... Guess every restaurant picks its own fancy name for the dish, but that's the generic name Naaah...
56 Post contains images MaverickM11 : Oooh themz is good too. And fat free
57 David L : I guess you didn't mean to say this then...
58 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : it is fairly simple, if you have "Döner" in normal spelling you have DOENER in Capital spelling as there are no ¨¨¨ available for Capital
59 Post contains images David L : No, but, if you insist on trying to "correct" people: 1. Make sure you know what you're correcting: We spell it "doner" because that's how it's spell
60 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : in short, it is basically the same. D N eR
61 Post contains images David L : NO! The "n" and "r" are NOT capitalised! It is IMPOSSIBLE! Signed ME AVN FAN.
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