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Accepting Scottish Bank Notes In England  
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3948 posts, RR: 18
Posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3575 times:

 hissyfit 

What is it with these places in England that won't accept Scottish bank notes??? I just don't get it!? I worked in a cash centre for Midland bank for years and am fully aware that that Scottish notes are just as "sterling" as English ones so what's the deal?

I spend a lot of time in Scotland through work and very often have a pocketful of English and Scottish notes but when I don't have any Scottish ones to pay with in Scotland, I'm never faced with any "we don't accept English notes" signs or grumbling up there, but come back down to England and there are signs galore in just about every type of establishment you can think of that accepts cash saying "we don't accept Scottish notes" but when you ask why you just get "company policy"  sarcastic 

It's really annoying. Isn't there some law that dictates they must accept them if they're sterling and obviously not counterfeit?

I wouldn't like to even try it with NI notes - it would take the grumbling to a whole new level!  Wow!

R

66 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21467 posts, RR: 53
Reply 1, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3571 times:

Now I can see why many britons are so vehemently opposed to the Euro - it would do away with the beloved chaos they're so fond of at home...  mischievous   innocent 

User currently offlineLegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3313 posts, RR: 39
Reply 2, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3557 times:

Quoting RobK (Thread starter):
I wouldn't like to even try it with NI notes - it would take the grumbling to a whole new level!

Good chocie as they won't accept NI notes. I believe everywhere in England only excepts English notes. Where as everywhere else in the UK accept all notes including NI and Scottish notes. (Do Wales ahve their own notes?)

What are the rules in Scotland? Will they accept NI notes?



Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3948 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3553 times:

Quoting RobK (Thread starter):
What is it with these places in England that won't accept Scottish bank notes??? I just don't get it!? I worked in a cash centre for Midland bank for years and am fully aware that that Scottish notes are just as "sterling" as English ones so what's the deal?



Quoting Klaus (Reply 1):
Now I can see why many britons are so vehemently opposed to the Euro - it would do away with the beloved chaos they're so fond of at home...

It gets better....

Scottish bank notes are technically not legal tender, because while they are issued by a bank with authority to do so, only coins are classed as legal tender in Scottish law- the same goes for Northern Irish bank notes.

Scottish notes were legal tender for a short period during world war 2, but it was withdrawn shortly after the end.

Quote:

All Scottish banks have the right to print their own notes. Three choose to do so: The Bank of Scotland (founded 1695), The Royal Bank of Scotland (founded 1727) and the Clydesdale Bank (owned by National Australia Bank). Only the Royal Bank prints pound notes. All the banks print 5,10,20 and 100 notes. Only the Bank of Scotland and Clydesdale Bank print 50 pound notes.

Scottish bank notes are not legal tender in Scotland.

http://www.siliconglen.com/Scotland/1_7.html

Quote:

Are Scottish & Northern Irish notes legal tender?
In short ‘No’ these notes are not legal tender; only Bank of England notes are legal tender but only in England and Wales.

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/about/faqs.htm

[Edited 2007-05-13 21:46:09]

User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3948 posts, RR: 18
Reply 4, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 3542 times:

Interesting. But do they have to accept them if they've got sterling written on them (jock notes in England/Wales)?

 confused 

R


User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3948 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3528 times:

Quoting RobK (Reply 4):
Interesting. But do they have to accept them if they've got sterling written on them (jock notes in England/Wales)?

Nope, they arent legal tender

It can however be argued that they are legal currency for payment of a debt. This does not mean that a shop has to accept it at the till because at that particular point, no debt exists between the shop and the customer - this actually applies to all currency and tender.

Just because you have money, it doesn't mean I have to accept it.

[Edited 2007-05-13 22:01:44]

User currently offlineBCNGRO From Andorra, joined Oct 2004, 584 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3506 times:

When I was studying in Durham I remember travelling to Edimburgh and bringing back Scottish notes and then using them in Durham or Newcastle. I never had a problem using them, some people just said "oh, scottish notes" but accepted them. Maybe I was just lucky using them in establishments where Scottish notes were accepted.  Confused

[Edited 2007-05-13 22:32:02]


At the bus station, buses stop. At the train station, trains stop. At my desk, I have a work station.
User currently offlineSteve7E7 From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 476 posts, RR: 50
Reply 7, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3483 times:

Quoting Moo (Reply 5):
Just because you have money, it doesn't mean I have to accept it.

I have ALWAYS accepted Scottish notes at work and will continue to do so.

The bank accepts them without question when I pay them in so why should I refuse them?


User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3948 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3473 times:

Quoting Steve7E7 (Reply 7):

I have ALWAYS accepted Scottish notes at work and will continue to do so.

The bank accepts them without question when I pay them in so why should I refuse them?

That comment was more about any money, not just Scottish notes - unless a debt already exists, there is no legal reason why I need accept any money you present as payment for something, whether it be Scottish notes, English notes or coins.

Besides, there is a good reason why places do not accept Scottish notes in England - because there are so few in circulation in England, and so few shop workers actually know what they look like (unlike ordinary English bank notes, which they handle each and every day) its actually easier for small time forgers to pass notes successfully. This gets more of a problem the further south you go.

Any good shop worker should know the anti forging devices built into English bank notes (raised text, ink that rubs off if you rub the note against a bit of paper, water mark, intricacies in the printing, metallic threads etc), but how many of them know which of these, if any, are built into Scottish notes?


User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3948 posts, RR: 18
Reply 9, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3456 times:

So if I order a pizza and have it delivered to my house then therefore a debt exists and it can be paid for with a Scottish bank note because it is legal tender and the same currency as my own country, regardless of the fact that they have notices all over their shop stating that they do not accept Scottish notes, right?

 confused 

R


User currently offlineGkirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24936 posts, RR: 56
Reply 10, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3449 times:

Quoting Legoguy (Reply 2):
What are the rules in Scotland? Will they accept NI notes?

If they are Sterling then it's legal.

Quoting Moo (Reply 3):
Scottish bank notes are technically not legal tender

False.

Quoting RobK (Reply 9):

If they don't accept Scottish bank notes then I would accuse them of being racist.



When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineDaleaholic From UK - England, joined Oct 2005, 3208 posts, RR: 13
Reply 11, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3448 times:

Why do you even have a scottish note in the first place? If you're that bothered about it being refused as legal tender, tell the shop that gives it to you as change that you want an english note instead. grumpy  The shop I work in does not accept scottish notes, I for one do not know the particular reason but I've been told not to accept them. We even have a sign by the till saying that we don't, yet time and time again people come in and kick up a fuss... That's the policy... Deal with it!  mad 

Quoting Moo (Reply 8):
how many of them know which of these, if any, are built into Scottish notes?

 Smile  yes  I wouldn't know what a scottish note looks like let alone know whether it is real or not!  Silly



Religion is an illusion of childhood... Outgrown under proper education.
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3948 posts, RR: 18
Reply 12, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3441 times:

Quoting Daleaholic (Reply 11):
Why do you even have a scottish note in the first place? If you're that bothered about it being refused as legal tender, tell the shop that gives it to you as change that you want an english note instead.

Which part of "I spend a lot of time in Scotland through work" are you unable to grasp?  sarcastic  Show me a cash machine in Glasgow or Edinburgh that spits out English notes and I'll happily use it.  sarcastic 

Furthermore, what exactly is the shop meant to do if they don't have an English ten or five pound note to give me as change? Piss me off totally by giving me a handful of coins instead?  sarcastic 

 sarcastic 

R


User currently offlineBritish767 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2005, 284 posts, RR: 21
Reply 13, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3430 times:

I work in a cash office at a supermarket, dealing with some £30,000 every Sunday (today the note counter broke and I had to count it all by hand   ). We'd get on average around £60 worth of Scottish notes out of the whole lot. We have to turn away Scottish £1 notes though, as we can't bank them, and people won't take them back as change.

We also get the odd Bank of Ireland note (from N. Ireland). I remember once we got a £5 note from N. Ireland that didn't even look like money, as it was very waxy, was portrait, and had a clear panel, and had a picture of a spacecraft on it...weird. Apparently it was OK though, as the bank have not sent it back to us!

[Edited 2007-05-14 01:11:29]

User currently offlineLegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3313 posts, RR: 39
Reply 14, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3426 times:

Quoting British767 (Reply 13):
I remembr once we got a £5 note from N. Ireland that didn't even look like money, as it was very waxy, was portrait, and had a clear panel, and had a picture of a spacecraft on it...weird.

Ahh that was a new £5 introduced a while ago. It's supposed to be unripable so it's hard to damage. That's the only NI note like that.



Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3948 posts, RR: 18
Reply 15, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3419 times:

Quoting British767 (Reply 13):
We have to turn away Scottish £1 notes though, as we can't bank them

That's actually complete bollox and a long standing urban myth. I can assure you that you can bank them just like any other sterling note and I used to handle thousands of them per day when I worked for Midland Bank (now HSBC). In fact, if you work for Morrisons or Somerfield then the money that you bank in your cash office used to come to me and my colleagues for confirming the contents of the deposit bags before being credited to your supermarket's account!

Quoting British767 (Reply 13):
We also get the odd Bank of Ireland note (from N. Ireland). I remembr once we got a £5 note from N. Ireland that didn't even look like money, as it was very waxy, was portrait, and had a clear panel, and had a picture of a spacecraft on it...weird. Apparently it was OK though, as the bank have not sent it back to us!

Yep, they're issued by the Northern Bank and are made of plastic, but are still legal tender/sterling so no reason not to accept it. They're very rare and in all the time I worked in the cash centre I only ever saw 2 ! I exchanged one of them myself and have it here at home, hoping that one day it will be very collectable and worth a lot of money. Here's one I found on Ebay.

  

R

[Edited 2007-05-14 01:14:49]

User currently offlineLegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3313 posts, RR: 39
Reply 16, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3409 times:

Quoting RobK (Reply 15):
I exchanged one of them myself and have it here at home, hoping that one day it will be very collectable and worth a lot of money. Here's one I found on Ebay.

 Wow! If you can sell them each on ebay for £9.99... I have like 6 of them at the moment!

EDIT... It's the George Best Bank note that sells for double money on ebay...

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/RARE-GEORGE-BE...sPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

[Edited 2007-05-14 01:35:24]


Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3948 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 3394 times:

Quoting Gkirk (Reply 10):
Quoting Legoguy (Reply 2):
What are the rules in Scotland? Will they accept NI notes?

If they are Sterling then it's legal.

Its not as clear cut as that, no one has to accept anything - Sterling or not. And Sterling issuances may not be legal tender or currency (think old banknotes, which are most definitely Sterling, but cannot be accepted by shops after they have been withdrawn from circulation).

Quoting Gkirk (Reply 10):
Quoting Moo (Reply 3):
Scottish bank notes are technically not legal tender

False.

I posted two links to back up my comment and I have a whole raft of others - its as plain as day, Scottish notes are not legal tender as considered under Scottish or English law. They may be in every day use, and the argument has been made that they are legal currency in some situations but the two terms are totally different.

Quite how you can simply say 'false' when it has already been demonstrated that the Bank of England and Scotland themselves don't consider Scottish notes legal tender is quite beyond me.

If you require more convincing, lets have a quote from the Royal Bank of Scotland on the subject:

Quote:

Legal tender

There are more Royal Bank banknotes circulating in Scotland than those of any other bank but, with the exception of temporary provisions during both World Wars, Scottish banknotes have never been 'legal tender' even in Scotland. Today, no banknote qualifies as 'legal tender' north of the Border, although they remain legal currency. The notes may also circulate freely in England and Wales, although branches of the Royal Bank there may not issue them.

http://www.rbs.com/about03.asp?id=AB...BANKNOTES/HISTORY_OF_OUR_BANKNOTES

How about representatives for the four big Scottish banks?

Quote:

Scottish Banknotes are legal currency – i.e. they are approved by the UK Parliament. However, Scottish Bank notes are not Legal Tender, not even in Scotland.

http://www.scotbanks.org.uk/legal_tender.php

Quoting Gkirk (Reply 10):

If they don't accept Scottish bank notes then I would accuse them of being racist.

And yay for another dilution of a terminology - refusal to accept a bank note from a certain country is nowhere near racism, if you can actually call 'scottish' a race at all!


User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13116 posts, RR: 12
Reply 18, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3371 times:

In my experiences in the UK and Scotland, Scotland banknotes were accepted in "England" in those areas near the border, less accepted as one got further from Scotland. Yet, one could use "England" notes in Scotland without any problem. It is a bit confusing and one has to wonder why this system exists for what is the same country.

User currently offlineN229NW From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 1950 posts, RR: 31
Reply 19, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3355 times:

Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 18):
In my experiences in the UK and Scotland, Scotland banknotes were accepted in "England" in those areas near the border, less accepted as one got further from Scotland.

In the past I've used Scottish notes, including the one pound notes, all the way down in London multiple times after trips north of the border. Sometimes I got comments, and once a young saleswoman didn't want to believe it was real (I guess she'd never seen one before?!) But she asked her boss, who assured her it was, and they took it.

Seems to be really hit and miss...



It's people like you what cause unrest!
User currently offlineGkirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24936 posts, RR: 56
Reply 20, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3333 times:

Quoting Daleaholic (Reply 11):
The shop I work in does not accept scottish notes, I for one do not know the particular reason but I've been told not to accept them.

If it's got Sterling on, then it's legal.



When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineOhthedrama747 From UK - Scotland, joined Jan 2005, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 3323 times:

We got our Scottish money refused in quite a few places in London. But then some other places were more than happy to take them.

Was down for a trip to Alton Towers one year and had to go to the petrol station. Gave her the money and she was holding it up to the light thinking it was fake etc.

Like N229NW says, it's really hit or miss.

Christ, I'm just going to use my VISA Debit from now on. Save the bloody hassle.

G


User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3948 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3309 times:

Quoting Gkirk (Reply 20):

If it's got Sterling on, then it's legal.

Again, wrong. Stop repeating this old school falacy, especially as I have produced enough links to prove otherwise.

And to further elaborate against this falacy, the Coinage Act of 1971 laid down a set of upper limits for legal tender of coinage, above which noone is required to accept as payment for anything -

50p up to £10.
20p up to £10.

10p up to £5.
5p up to £5.
bronze coins up to 20p.

So no, being marked as or issued under 'Sterling' is not automatically legal.

[Edited 2007-05-14 11:21:58]

User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 23, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3289 times:

Quoting Moo (Reply 22):
And to further elaborate against this falacy, the Coinage Act of 1971 laid down a set of upper limits for legal tender of coinage, above which noone is required to accept as payment for anything -

It's all true, but you really shouldn't get caught up in the legal tender argument, because the meaning of it is so narrow as to be not worth bothering with. People are often under the impression that legal tender means that is is compulsory to accept payment, and that's not true, because it's never compulsory to accept any form of payment at any kind of shop or institution, it is a matter for the two parties. When you take an item to the counter, you are offering to make a payment of a certain amount, and the shop then decides whether it wants to accept your payment. That's why it's also nonsense for people to suggest that a mis-priced item must be sold at the price it has been given.

The real reason why shops in England tend to be reluctant to accept Scottish or Northern Irish notes the further south you go is much more simple: The staff see them only very rarely and lack the experience to determine whether or not the notes are genuine. It's a long-established scam to try to pay with fake Scottish notes and one that people would often get away with. Easier to refuse to accept them altogether, then there's no prospect of being diddled.

To all intents and purposes, in the real world there's no reason whatsover legally to refuse to accept Scottish notes, but it's a question of practicality, and that's simply down to the shop owner, nothing more or less. A shop in Benebecula seeing few Bank of England notes could perfectly well decline one for the same reason.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3948 posts, RR: 18
Reply 24, posted (7 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3284 times:

Quoting Banco (Reply 23):
It's all true, but you really shouldn't get caught up in the legal tender argument, because the meaning of it is so narrow as to be not worth bothering with. People are often under the impression that legal tender means that is is compulsory to accept payment, and that's not true, because it's never compulsory to accept any form of payment at any kind of shop or institution, it is a matter for the two parties. When you take an item to the counter, you are offering to make a payment of a certain amount, and the shop then decides whether it wants to accept your payment. That's why it's also nonsense for people to suggest that a mis-priced item must be sold at the price it has been given.

The real reason why shops in England tend to be reluctant to accept Scottish or Northern Irish notes the further south you go is much more simple: The staff see them only very rarely and lack the experience to determine whether or not the notes are genuine. It's a long-established scam to try to pay with fake Scottish notes and one that people would often get away with. Easier to refuse to accept them altogether, then there's no prospect of being diddled.

To all intents and purposes, in the real world there's no reason whatsover legally to refuse to accept Scottish notes, but it's a question of practicality, and that's simply down to the shop owner, nothing more or less. A shop in Benebecula seeing few Bank of England notes could perfectly well decline one for the same reason.

So

Quoting RobK (Reply 9):
...if I order a pizza and have it delivered to my house then therefore a debt exists and it can be paid for with a Scottish bank note because it is legal tender and the same currency as my own country, regardless of the fact that they have notices all over their shop stating that they do not accept Scottish notes, right?

 confused 

R


25 Banco : No, because they can accept sea shells as payment if they want to. Notes of any description, English or Scottish, are merely a commonly agreed method
26 Post contains images Moo : I agree, but by the letter of the law.... Yes, legal tender and legal currency are two entirely different things, and the differences lie in what a c
27 Post contains images HT : The delivery man must accept Scottish bank notes unless he wears a hat indicating "No Scottish bank notes accepted" A while ago, I received Gibraltar
28 Banco : More to the point, they just won't hand over the pizza and are fully within their rights not to because the transaction hasn't been completed. If the
29 Moo : Now thats a bit iffy - the pizza was ordered by yourself, cooked by the pizza store for you and delivered to your house in the agreement that a payme
30 Banco : Not really. It's no different to you picking up an item from the shelves of the supermarket and walking with it to the checkout. At that point no tra
31 Moo : Legally, its actually very different to you picking up an item on a supermarket shelf and walking to the checkout, since the pizza place are not only
32 Moo : In summary to this thread, I think its safe to say that the legalities of anything are quite complex, especially within countries like the UK where la
33 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : I still remember that I after 4 days in Scotland (Edinburgh+Glasgow) had banknotes of the Royal Bank of Scotland, the Bank of Scotland and the Clydes
34 Banco : But the transaction is all bound up in trust that you will pay, nothing more. There's no invoice sent to you and there is no contract, which is why y
35 Post contains images Klaus : Hilarious! It's like a Monty Python episode! I for my part, however, prefer to leave humour and a sense for the bizarre and other eccentricities out
36 WSOY : Wow yes let's talk about the Euro -- the Euro greatly simplified my personal wallet management. I've been paying almost everything in plastics since
37 Klaus : Masochism so far has been and hopefully will remain a niche preference.
38 Post contains links WSOY : What do you mean? What do you have against the local community currencies, for instance? They can't have any real effect on you beloved ECB, for inst
39 British767 : Maybe in terms of taking it down to the bank and paying it in, in person. But when considering the fact that when Securicor come to collect money, th
40 ME AVN FAN : so that everybody loses time and energy in order to calculate -- and you in business never really know whether you are winning or losing on currency
41 Post contains images RobK : Yes you're actually right there. I now remember processing the supermarket deposits and it was all bulk cash and no "bits". Whatever you do, don't mi
42 Klaus : Nothing. If they make you happy, more power to you! I just don't see any benefits that could compensate the significant hassle they create. I don't s
43 Banco : There isn't any confusion. The debate was on highly arcane legal definitions, not the day to day reality. I know you'd love it to be all chaos so tha
44 Post contains images Daleaholic : Look, In the time you've spent bitching about places not accepting the notes in this thread... you could have gone to the bank and got them fooking ch
45 ME AVN FAN : while I assume that by "local community currencies" he means the old national currencies, the term to me sounds like "local" things like the Zürich-
46 Post contains images Klaus : Really? From the thread starter: You're obviously having fun with the current currency confusion, but simply paying with my normal money (almost) any
47 Post contains images Banco : And the confusion? Some accept them, some don't. It's all to do with having a consistent, unbroken line of democracy which actually allows for anomal
48 Post contains images Klaus : The concept which you seem to have such difficulty understanding is consistency. Trying to explain away artificial inconsistencies which make transac
49 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : I just now re-read the opening post, and that post was clearly on day to day realities and practical aspects, and NOT on some legal definitions, some
50 Banco : The concept you seem to have some difficulty understanding is freedom. There's absolute no pressing reason whatsoever to change things, just because
51 Post contains images Klaus : Yawn. My overwhelming instinct is to make things work. And in that vein I'm a strong advocate of the Euro, which simply works very well as a currency
52 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : - I found it an interesting thing, not least with the 3 banknotes-printing banks in Scotland. On return to Zurich, I told some banking people it migh
53 David L : They might seem difficult to you but I can assure you we take it in our stride. The rampant confusion you refer to is, in fact, pretty rare. Again, n
54 Post contains images Banco : Oh yes. Things have gone so hideously, disastrously wrong in the 300 years of us having multiple bank notes. And in a fabulous co-incidence, pounds h
55 Banco : It's something of a historical hangover. Until comparatively recently there were a number of banks able to issue notes in England too. Despite the na
56 Post contains images Klaus : The fact that someone felt an urge to post the thread starter about the issue being painful in his practical life speaks to it being a problem. Not a
57 Post contains images Banco : Riiiight. So you go on a whinge-fest about something in Britain that frankly has nothing to do with you, isn't a major issue, spend time talking abou
58 David L : While I sympathise with the thread starter, you seem to have dismissed the fact that only a small percentage of the UK population experiences this an
59 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : How could you even dare to do so ! the old saying is (in German) "Am Deutschen Wesen soll die Welt genesen" , which might be translated as "Germannes
60 Post contains images Klaus : Watching you squirm defensively simply warms my cold, evil heart when considering the larger context and your earlier summary dismissal of currency c
61 Klaus : It effectively heightens the barrier between the british regions, apparently. I've never claimed that it was an insurmountable obstacle. Oh, that's q
62 Post contains images David L : And millions of Euro-sceptics are apparently "uninformed" yet one complaint about one problem with UK banknotes is enough to tell the whole "sorry" s
63 Banco : Indeed. And, there's no reason for it to be taken away from them. *Sigh*. Different bits of paper is irrelevant. Your attempt to compare that to subs
64 Post contains images Klaus : Unless you find a way to make even the same currency inconsistent within itself...! Quite a feat, but you've managed it, apparently! I've noticed tha
65 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : well, "Wesen" rhymes with other national adjectives as well, so you can replace "am Deu...." with "am Am" - hardly. A special aspect in currency matt
66 Nighthawk : Useless trivia: The bank of england was founded by a Scotsman, William Paterson in 1694. He then founded the Bank Of Scotland a year later.
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Smoking To Be Banned In England...sort Of posted Wed Oct 26 2005 23:33:27 by Gkirk