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What Book Are You Reading--me: Inviting Disaster  
User currently offlineScrubbsYWG From Canada, joined Mar 2007, 1495 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1321 times:

Haven't seen one of these on here, and since the current book I am on can be somewhat related to aviation i figured i would give it a go.

I am reading Inviting Disaster: Lessons from the Edge of Technology, by James R. Chiles. The book focuses on how even though we have gone so far with technology, the machines we have created have sometimes allowed us to be even further removed from the machine and allows us to not be as aware to what is going on. The book looks at all kinds of disasters, from plane crashes to three mile island and so on. I am actually finding this book quite interesting. It doesn't just focus on technology, but also on the psyche of the users of said equipment and tries to find answers on why they do what they do.

here is the books summary on the back cover:

Quote:
Inviting Disaster, by technology and history writer James R. Chiles, is an unusual book: it appeals to the macabre desires that keep us riveted to highway accidents, while knowledgeably discoursing on the often preventable mistakes that caused them. At its heart are colorful stories behind more than 50 of the most infamous catastrophes that periodically chilled the advance of the industrial age. There are both those well remembered (the 1986 Challenger explosion, for example) and those now largely forgotten (a 1937 gas explosion at a Texas school that killed 298). But along with lively depictions of these deadly devastations and white-knuckle calamities--the U.S. battleship Maine, Apollo 13, and Three Mile Island among them--Chiles offers an informed analysis of the unfortunate chain of events that brought them about. And by grouping like incidents to show how fatal "system fractures" eventually developed through a combination of human error and mechanical malfunction, he also suggests how we might sidestep such tragedies in the future. In so, doing he fashions these spectacular accounts of failed planes, trains, ships, bridges, dams, factories, and other conveyances and facilities into a cautionary tale about technological progress. --Howard Rothman

The book has an interesting perspective that you often don't get from shows on TV about disasters, or anything I learnt while getting an engineering degree. I honestly think this is one book that could help me become a better engineer.

23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7643 posts, RR: 35
Reply 1, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1316 times:

Right now I'm reading "The End of The World: From Revelation to Eco-Disaster" by Simon Pearson.

Quite interesting, and just confirming my own beliefs that all societies, civilizations, religions have their own interpretation of the end of the world and that they also like to borrow many ideologies from one another.

After this, I've still got a few Ken Follett books that I need to read before I buy any more.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineCPH-R From Denmark, joined May 2001, 6013 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1302 times:

At the moment I'm stuck with reading up on exams, but I'm considering getting a book called "Screwed" (direct translation), which tells the rather controversial story of a Danish billionaire and businessman Bøje Nielsen. In the early 80's he was estimated to be worth more than 1 billion DKK & he even purchased a Caravelle as a private jet. However, after having split with his usual partner around 1982, his company was declared bankrupt & put in the hand of a group of administrators tasked with getting the creditors as much of their money as possible.

Which is where the scandal takes off, because while Bøje Nielsen and his lawyers kept pointing out that there was plenty of values in the company to pay the creditors in full, the administrators kept estimating that 200+ million DKK would be missing in the end. So they kept selling off parts of the company (some say that they were sold for far less than their actual worth), and 10 years later, they declared that all creditors had been paid - and that after their fee (40 million DKK) there was still 85 million DKK left for Bøje Nielsen.

It wasn't until 2005 that Bøje Nielsen had the book ('Screwed') published & at the same time he sued the Danish bankruptcy court, stating that at least 100 million had been lost due to improper handling of the company assets. He lost the case, but yesterday (May 21st) he filed suit, through his lawyer, against the Danish state at the European Court of Human Rights. Sadly, Bøje Nielsen also died yesterday after a long period of fighting severe diabetes.


User currently offlineTZ757300 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 2869 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1297 times:

Age of Reason

Thomas Paine



LETS GO MOUNTAINEERS!
User currently offlineLanas From Argentina, joined Aug 2006, 978 posts, RR: 13
Reply 4, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1291 times:

"Notre-Dame de Paris" from Victor Hugo
It´s the original story of the hunchback of Notre Dame

Cheers  Smile
Lanas.-



"Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens." J.R.R. Tolkien
User currently offlineQueso From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1284 times:

Reading it for the 3rd time....



User currently offlineArmitageShanks From UK - England, joined Dec 2003, 3631 posts, RR: 15
Reply 6, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1275 times:

There are a few books I'm going to get before I go on a trip in June.

"Salt: A world History" by Mark Kurlansky. It looked interesting because I never knew just how important salt was to the ancient/modern world.

"The Quiet Room: A Journey Out of the Torment of Madness" by Lori Schiller and Amanda Bennett. It chronicles the life of a girl with schizophrenia and how she has lived with and treated it.


User currently offlineMBMBOS From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2598 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1273 times:

Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem

Almost done. Very enjoyable. Lethem works with the detective genre to come up with a thoroughly original novel featuring a protaganist who has Tourette's Syndrome. Lots of interesting plays on words. This is a book for people who like word play.


User currently offlineLanas From Argentina, joined Aug 2006, 978 posts, RR: 13
Reply 8, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1267 times:

Has anyone read John J. Nance??? It might be a silly question but here in Argentina he´s mostly unknown and I could read only one of his books. I found it quite amusing (interesting mix of action with aviation).
I was wondering how famous he was within the aviation enthusiasts in the US or Europe, for example.

Cheers!  Smile
Lanas.-



"Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens." J.R.R. Tolkien
User currently offlineRJpieces From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1265 times:

Twice as Good: Condoleezza Rice and Her Path to Power by Marcus Mabry

User currently offlineNWADC9 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4898 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1265 times:

Rebel in Chief by Fred Barnes
The ACLU verses America by Alan Sears and Graig Osten
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (finishing it tonight; school)



Flying an aeroplane with only a single propeller to keep you in the air. Can you imagine that? -Capt. Picard
User currently offlineTbar220 From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7013 posts, RR: 26
Reply 11, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1260 times:

Just finished reading In The Pond by Ma Jin. It's a fictional book about a Chinese artist and the struggles he faces in modern communist China. It was a great read, I am interested in reading more books by this author.


NO URLS in signature
User currently offlineCopaair737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1244 times:

Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi.

Great book by which the movie "Goodfellas" is based off of.

I highly recommend it.


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7643 posts, RR: 35
Reply 13, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1244 times:

I love these threads, I'm always on the look out for new and interesting books.


A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineCopaair737 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1242 times:

Quoting ACDC8 (Reply 13):
I love these threads, I'm always on the look out for new and interesting books.

I'd definitely check out the Wiseguy book then. Casino is another good book that got adapted into a film.


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7643 posts, RR: 35
Reply 15, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1233 times:

Quoting Copaair737 (Reply 14):
I'd definitely check out the Wiseguy book then. Casino is another good book that got adapted into a film.

Will look into it, as long as it's a book that a movie was based on, not a book that's based on a movie, I'd be interested. These two sound like something that I'd really enjoy though ...

Quoting ScrubbsYWG (Thread starter):
am reading Inviting Disaster: Lessons from the Edge of Technology, by James R. Chiles.



Quoting Tbar220 (Reply 11):
Just finished reading In The Pond by Ma Jin



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineZak From Greenland, joined Sep 2003, 1993 posts, RR: 8
Reply 16, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1232 times:

right now: cien años de soledad


10=2
User currently offlineMiamiair From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 1226 times:

Lucifer's Hammer

Comet hits the Earth, blah, blah blah


User currently offlineFerengi80 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 693 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1218 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

'Lisey's Story' by Stephen King. I'm a big fan of horrors/psychological thrillers. I'm listening to the audio book 'The Regulators' by Richard Bachman in the car. (Bachman is a pseudonym of Stephen King!)

Quoting Lanas (Reply 8):
Has anyone read John J. Nance?

He is a literary master! I particularly enjoyed 'Pandora's Clock' and 'Turbulence'.

Another good author to check out is Nelson DeMille, his novel 'Night Fall' is well worth checking out. It's fiction, but focuses around TWA flight 800. Well worth checking out!



AF1981 LHR-CDG A380-800 10 July 2010 / AF1980 CDG-LHR A380-800 11 July 2010
User currently offlineBeaucaire From Syria, joined Sep 2003, 5252 posts, RR: 25
Reply 19, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 1216 times:

"THE FRUITS OF THE TREE OF LIFE - The Cabbalistic Tradition " by Omraam Mikhaël Aïvanhov ,who was a French-Bulgarian Philosopher.


Please respect animals - don't eat them...
User currently offlineLHStarAlliance From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 5 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 1213 times:

Quoting ScrubbsYWG (Thread starter):

I haven´t read for some months , well a year
But since two weeks I´m reading a book called :

Bildung - alles was man wissen muß - Dietrich Schwanitz




pretty interesting !




Konstantin

[Edited 2007-05-22 12:53:00]

User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 5 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 1195 times:

Wilfred Thesiger, The Marsh Arabs.

User currently offlineDeltaAVL From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1893 posts, RR: 6
Reply 22, posted (7 years 5 months 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 1186 times:

Night, by Elie Wiesel. First time I've read it and I'm not far, but I from what I've heard, it's a very accurate depiction of what went on during the Holocaust.


"We break, We bend, With hand in hand, When hope is gone, Just hang on." -Guster
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13229 posts, RR: 77
Reply 23, posted (7 years 5 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1176 times:

I am enjoying hugely 'The Damned United' by David Peace.

It is about the 44 day tenure at Leeds United Football Club, of the late football manager Brian Clough, a well known figure, even legendary figure in the UK, this was in the summer of 1974.

It has already been optioned for a film version, by the team who did 'The Queen', including Micheal Sheen, the brilliant actor who played Blair in that film, as Clough.

A mad roller coaster ride, in the first person, of Clough's drive, ruthlessness, paranoia, heavy drinking.
Clough regarded Leeds, his nemesis in previous teams he managed, as a rough team who used gamesmanship and outright cheating to win, telling the players on his first day 'you might as well throw all those cups and trophies in the biggest fucking bin you can find, because as far as I'm concerned, you won them all by cheating'.
He replaced another long term nemesis, Don Revie, who went to manage England, Clough apparently taking a sledgehammer to Revies's old desk.
Revie of the secret players dossiers, suspicion of backhanders to officials.

The great strength of this book, is that ordinarily I could not give a stuff about football, or sport in general, much less read a fictionalised account of a true period.
But this is a Dave Peace work, a startling writer who has a great sense of the time and place he writes about.
Now living in Japan, Peace grew up in the place and period this book is set.

Previously, I've read his fictionalised, searing account of the 1984/5 Miners Strike, 'GB84', and the first of his 'Chapeltown trilogy', '1974', (followed by '1977', '1980' and '1983', set against murder and corruption in Yorkshire, England, in these years, where in real life the notorious serial killer Peter Sucliffe, AKA 'The Yorkshire Ripper' preyed upon female victims from (at least) 1974, to his inadvertent capture in 1981.

Peace's style is close to US writer 'James Ellroy'.
'The Damned United' has, even though I'm only midway through it, my highest possible recommendation.


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