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English Language Question  
User currently offlineBNE From Australia, joined Mar 2000, 3189 posts, RR: 12
Posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 925 times:

There have been some language questions recently so I thought I would add another.

Hi have a question that is directed to the people in Europe, not necessarily those in France, or Germany but those in the smaller countries.

Is everything written in your countries language or are they some things written in English to make it simpler.

Are all your magazines and books and instructions on how to use equipment all written in your language, percentage wise, I was wondering in the smaller countries whether the market would be big enough to make translations affordable. Are books like Airways & Airliners available.

How many people speak English, percentage wise to carry out a decent conversation.

When did you learn English.

How hard or difficult is it the read the posts in the forums especially non aviation.

Thanks for any replies.






Why fly non stop when you can connect
4 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineD-AIGW From Hong Kong, joined Jul 2001, 261 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 906 times:

English has become part of our language (Cantonese) here in Hong Kong that I think one day it might take over as our first language.

For example...
lay yong ICQ SEND goh MESSAGE bay ngor lah
(= Use ICQ to send me a message)
BOOK gaan ROOM lay hoy MEETING
(= Book a room to call a meeting)

In my (high) school it has even become a tradition to incorporate English words normally into a sentence that is spoken in Cantonese, particularly some technical or special terms. For some of those we do'nt even know the proper Chinese/Cantonese name...

Personally I think I speak English much better than I do for my mother tongue, Cantonese (a dialect of Chinese).


User currently offlinePHX-LJU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 900 times:

I'm a Slovenian-American, so I'll attempt to answer some of your questions.

>>Is everything written in your countries language or are they some things written in English to make it simpler.

Many Slovene companies have English names. There are two reasons for this: English is very popular among Slovenia's young people, and Slovene pronounciation tends to give foreigners a really hard time. Some people are even sponsoring a bill that would require companies to use Slovene-language names. However, the bill also has many opponents and is unlikely to ever become a law. It is a generational thing: Many young Slovenians like the English names, while many older citizens fear that the Slovene language may eventually die out.

>>"Are all your magazines and books and instructions on how to use equipment all written in your language, percentage wise, I was wondering in the smaller countries whether the market would be big enough to make translations affordable."

In the big downtown bookstores, more than 50% of all books displayed are in English. Most people who frequent these stores have some knowledge of English. Many popular books, especially fiction, are translated into Slovene (even though there are fewer and fewer government subsidies for that), but most specialized books are not. Coffee-table books are almost never translated. Just the opposite, in fact: Many coffee-table books about Slovenia are also published in English for foreigners.

In short, most Slovenian publishers are more concerned about publishing original works than translating English-language books (except best-sellers). After all, most young urban residents understand English well enough to read books without a translation.

As recently asa few years ago, Slovenian-language instruction manuals were rare. However, a new law requires all such booklets to be in Slovene. Some companies, such as Micosoft, actually print their official booklets in Slovene. Often, however, the distributor that puts together a special Slovene-language supplement to go with the official instruction book.

Computer programs and operating systems, such as Windows, are available in Slovene.

Television pograms and movies are never dubbed; they are always subtitled. Cartoons are usually dubbed, however.

>>"Are books like Airways & Airliners available."

English language books on aviation are available in Slovenia. However, only one bookstore (as far as I know) has a large selection of them. English-language magazines (even specialized ones) are also widely available.

>>"How many people speak English, percentage wise to carry out a decent conversation."

Most young people, and those living in the cities, speak English well. Most older people, and those living in the country, do not. I'm not sure about the exact numbers.

And before anyone gives me a hard time: Both the words "Slovene" and "Slovenian" are perfectly acceptable. I use them interchangeably.


User currently offlineDelta-flyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 2676 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 886 times:

I am also an American, but of Hungarian descent (PHX-LJU--our parents may have been "neighbors" so to speak, as Slovenia borders Hungary to the southwest.)

I do not have answers to all the questions, but I will be visiting Hungary this summer with my wife and 2 teenage boys, so I will surely know then.

I do have an answer to your first question, though....
Is everything written in your countries language or are they some things written in English to make it simpler.

In perusing Hungarian websites, I noticed that many companies have English names, and many technical and computer terms are used in English. In some cases, the English word is spelled in phonetic fashion, so a Hungarian who does not speak English can pronounce it (Hungarian is a phonetic language -- ie, words are spelled exactly as they sound).

One example is the word "software" -- in Hungarian, it is spelled "szaftver", more or less as it is pronounced in English. The "sz" sounds like an "s" and there is no "w" sound in Hungarian, just the hard "v". (You know how east Europeans have trouble pronouncing the "w")  Smile

Cheers,
Pete


User currently offlinePHX-LJU From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 11 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 875 times:

Delta-flyer wrote:

>>"PHX-LJU--our parents may have been "neighbors" so to speak, as Slovenia borders Hungary to the southwest."

Even more than that: My great-grandfather was Hungarian.

Delta-flyer wrote:

>>"In some cases, the English word is spelled in phonetic fashion, so a Hungarian who does not speak English can pronounce it (Hungarian is a phonetic language -- ie, words are spelled exactly as they sound)."

The same happens quite frequently in Slovenian, another phonetic language. Words like "menedzer" (manager) and "vikend" (weekend, prounounced vee-kend) have become widely accepted.


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