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Watched United 93 For The First Time  
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2178 times:

And it was one of the most riveting films I've ever witnessed. It didn't act, sound or feel like anything scripted. It felt like 9/11 all over again, but from a different perspective.

It brought me back to that horrible day, filled me, again, with nothinig but contempt for those who did such a cowardly act, in the name of God, made me almost snicker at the lack of inter-agency communication that took place that day, and made me again believe that all those people that day will not have died in vain-except for the scum terrorists, that is.

I know a lot of you watched it quite a while ago, but it was too raw for me to watch when it came out. I'm glad I watched it now. It was a tremendous film, in my humble opinion.

38 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineHalcyon From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2169 times:

The whole movie made me angry all over again, and the very end is still burned in my mind.

I agree with you 100%.


User currently offlineShannoninAMA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2169 times:

Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):


I know a lot of you watched it quite a while ago, but it was too raw for me to watch when it came out. I'm glad I watched it now. It was a tremendous film, in my humble opinion.

Couldn't agree more. It took me a while to convince myself to go see it, but it was well worth it. It provided a great perspective of how it happened from the (brave and courageous) passengers point of view. Very emotional, and an overall great movie.


Shannon  half 


User currently offlineDavestanKSAN From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 1678 posts, RR: 13
Reply 3, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2162 times:

I saw it pretty recently as well, when it debut on HBO. Agree with everything you said Falcon, and Lucas.....

RIP to all the victims, never forget

Dave



Yesterday we've sinned, today we move towards God. Touch the sky....love and respect...Safe Star!
User currently offlineQFA380 From Australia, joined Jul 2005, 2074 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2152 times:

I've seen it, even being an aussie and only 8 years old on 911 I still cried at the end when the list of names were shown.

I suggest you see Flight 93 aswell. I've seen them both and they offer very different perspectives of the same tragic event.

Here is a link I just found, pretty good, about a memorial they're building. http://www.honorflight93.org/


User currently offlineBA787 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 2596 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2084 times:

I found the film very touching as well.

I was the same age as QFA380 and I remember my Mum and neighbours all in tears. The images still give me goosepimples to this day, that film just made me shiver. Enjoyment is the wrong word to describe the film, but it was very good.

Cheers BA787


User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5712 posts, RR: 18
Reply 6, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2078 times:

Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):
And it was one of the most riveting films I've ever witnessed.

 checkmark  Evreryone should see it to (hopefully) realize what sort of enemy we are facing.

Quoting DavestanKSAN (Reply 3):
I saw it pretty recently as well, when it debut on HBO

Too bad you didn't see it in a movie theater. The experience is 100% more intense, imho.





User currently offlineAirTran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3704 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2076 times:
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United 93 left me filled with rage. I guess over time we have all healed since 9/11, but UA 93 opened those wounds right back up.


Nice Trip Report!!! Great Pics, thanks for posting!!!! B747Forever
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8153 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2060 times:

The ATC scenes were particularly riveting. It wasn't too difficult to imagine what had gone on in the cabin, so those scenes were very fly on the wall for me. But looking at the sheer chaos in the ATC and military command centers, as well as the total lack of preparation and shock, made me realize I had never put myself in those people's shoes before.

We all heard the stories of heroism from the streets of Manhattan for months, but this movie was a moving chronicle of the strings of sanity that those tasked with keeping our skies safe were able to maintain in the most gut-wrenching situation of their careers.

I saw it in the theatre during the first week of its original release in Japan and I had expected to be the only tearful person in the audience, but there were numerous people weeping. I think the most poignant moment was when the Newark tower controllers watched with utter horror as UA 175 streaked across the harbor toward its target. I absolutely lost it at that point.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineDeltaAVL From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1893 posts, RR: 6
Reply 9, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2054 times:

I loved United 93. What a unique and emotional film. It still remains my favorite movie, although it's the most depressing thing I've ever watched.

I saw it in the theater. When the plane crashed and the screen went black for a few moments, there were various sobs all around the room. Everyone was crying.

Glad you got to experience the film; it's quite a masterpiece.

[Edited 2007-06-24 15:21:47]


"We break, We bend, With hand in hand, When hope is gone, Just hang on." -Guster
User currently offlineNWA742 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2045 times:

I'm glad you watched it, Falcon. I agree with your review 100%.

I saw it soon after it came out on DVD - definitely one of the most powerful movies that I've ever seen. When I showed it to my father - he was in tears at the end - I have never, ever, seen him that way over a movie - and I've watched all sorts of movies with him - he's the last person that you would ever imagine crying over a movie - but this one did it.

Greengrass did an amazing job - he made it the exact opposite of what you would expect from a Hollywood real-life disaster movie. It was detailed, realistic, no hollywood simplifications, no nonsense side-stories. It sends chills through your bones, it re-ignites anger, it puts you in that 757.

After watching it, I believe every American that saw 9/11 should see this film. It will bring you back, and Americans these days need to go back. Many of my friends were hesitant, saying that they don't want to get depressed, or that Hollywood shouldn't be making it - but after convincing some to watch, they all thanked me, and now share my attitude.




-NWA742


User currently offlinePilotdude09 From Australia, joined May 2005, 1777 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 2010 times:

Only 2 movies ive cried in Titanic (LOL) and United 93

I think out of everything the hardest thing to watch was the extra features on the DVD when the Actors spend time with the families and they all cry, so sad but then they were some of many heroes on that day.

The way i look at it is that hundreds more would have died if they hadnt got back at those mongrels and i think its good to know that they tried to make those 'things' suffer. thats my opinion anyway.



Qantas, Still calling Australia Home.........
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8153 posts, RR: 26
Reply 12, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 2005 times:

Was just browsing some comments on IMDB and elsewhere and it's incredible how absurd some people's comments were. There are various criticisms of Greengrass's approach, not the least of which include his handling of the prayer in the opening scene, showing Jarrah's call to his wife at the gate, and their reluctance to choose a moment to attack on board. Apparently there are some morons out there who feel it was severe error in judgment to 'humanize' the hijackers.

I couldn't disagree more. It's absolutely imperative for everyone to be reminded of the fact that regardless of what we refer to them as in the pejorative out of anger, these perpetrators are indeed human, and are driven by conviction, emotion, and willpower that have been carefully augmented into a very clear sense of purpose. What's worse is those very traits operate on a scale that is far beyond the kind of thinking our common value systems allow for. To defeat the enemy, we must always understand exactly who they are.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineFlyKev From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2006, 1382 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1999 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

I saw this film at the cinema and it was most defiantly a moving film. As I looked around, people were in the same sort of situations as described above.
This is a powerful movie, and I feel a fitting tribute to the passengers on board the plane.

kev.



The white zone is for immediate loading and unloading of passengers only
User currently offlineCharlienorth From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1122 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1979 times:

Still can't see it,I knew one of the passengers in High School,vaguely knew the Captain and one of the Flight Attendants.Just seeing the trailers was tough. As far as the inter-agency communication goes I don't know how it is around the country in general,but in my suburb the police and f.d. still can't communicate with each other.

User currently offlineRobTrent From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2005, 260 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1977 times:

I saw the film recently on dvd - I am glad I did as i found myself remnembering that tragic day all over again and was emotional - not something you want to be seen in a cenema as a 44 y/o male !
I think the film is a very good recreation of events and it does serve as a testament to the brave crew I feel.

I see what you are saying Aaron747 however, I also disagree with you as it is difficult for me to reconcile inhuman acts and an attribution of Humanity.



T7 - You know it makes sense !
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13208 posts, RR: 77
Reply 16, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1965 times:

An outstanding cinematic achievement, all the more so since it was about recent events many still find traumatic.

Though, even with access to those on the end the those phone messages, access to as much background info as possible, there had to be some conjecture of the events on board the aircraft to a certain degree, they have the touch of reality due to the great care taken to present what was definite, with surviving eye-witnesses, for the rest of the film.
Use of non professionals, many in roles replicating what they did that day, was in fact a bonus, as was the absence of well known actors.

Greengrass, at first sight an odd choice, was in fact a very shrewd person to have directing.
He cut his teeth on feature length drama docs in the UK, usually about well known and controversial events.
Such as the events of 'Bloody Sunday' in Northern Ireland in 1972, there his film offered no palliatives, or excuses, to what went wrong that day, but it did humanise everyone involved, both realistically re-created the chaos of events, but with a firm grip of narrative, all the better to illuminate what was being depicted.

Greengrass brilliantly did this again for United 93, the escalating confusion, chaos, gradual realisation of what was unfolding are directed superbly, this part, what was happening on the ground, is so carefully researched, realistically depicted-no Hollywood histrionics for a start, it illuminates the situation, leads to understanding.
(In fact, I'd rate it as the best answer to all the conspiracy nuts).

Of course the terrorists should be humanised, they were humans.
Hesitation many well have occurred from them, when it became clear that the UA93 departure delay could screw up their part of the plot, predicated as it was on all four aircraft impacting within 30-45 minute period, to overwhelm, strike before fighters or any other response could come into play.
They might also have been one man short of what they intended for UA93.

Sept 11th was inevitably going to dramatised by Hollywood, good that the first major piece was such a sober, calm, fact based work, as gripping as anything professional screenwriters could come up with, Greengrass's steady hand made a great film that did not need 'buffing up'.

Also recommended, 'The Hamburg Cell' by Antonia Bird, a 2004 TV film focusing on the recruitment, indoctrination of the terrorists, particularly the one who was to pilot UA93.


User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1930 times:

Quoting Aaron747 (Reply 12):
as just browsing some comments on IMDB and elsewhere and it's incredible how absurd some people's comments were. There are various criticisms of Greengrass's approach, not the least of which include his handling of the prayer in the opening scene, showing Jarrah's call to his wife at the gate, and their reluctance to choose a moment to attack on board.

I thought one of the more powerful scenes is when you see one passenger reciting The Lord's Prayer, then it shifts to one of the terrorists praying in Arabic, then back to another passenger reciting The Lord's Prayer, back to a terrorist praying. It was powerful to me because the passengers were praying for mercy, and the terrorists were praying that their acts of murder would be rewarded. To juxtapose those was brilliant, I thought.


User currently offlineDeltaAVL From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1893 posts, RR: 6
Reply 18, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 1895 times:

Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 17):
I thought one of the more powerful scenes is when you see one passenger reciting The Lord's Prayer, then it shifts to one of the terrorists praying in Arabic, then back to another passenger reciting The Lord's Prayer, back to a terrorist praying. It was powerful to me because the passengers were praying for mercy, and the terrorists were praying that their acts of murder would be rewarded. To juxtapose those was brilliant, I thought.

Yes, I thought that was really incredible the way they laid that out. I think it was from that point on that I was crying. And I don't cry much.

I also thought John Powell did a great job with the music. If you pay attention to the music, it keeps getting more and more powerful, and gaining momentum as the drama heats up. I'd recommend buying the soundtrack if you're interested.



"We break, We bend, With hand in hand, When hope is gone, Just hang on." -Guster
User currently offlineA380US From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 1845 times:

I saw it when it was i theaters and well it just amazed me of heroicy of the fire fighters and police officers.
And i live in NY and will never forget 9/11 but that movie just helped me remember that you must always have faith



www.JandACosmetics.com
User currently offlineN174UA From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 994 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1817 times:

Quoting AirTran737 (Reply 7):
United 93 left me filled with rage. I guess over time we have all healed since 9/11, but UA 93 opened those wounds right back up.

 checkmark  I don't think anyone has truly "healed" since 9/11. It's just one of those events that will always be with you.

Quoting NWA742 (Reply 10):
Greengrass did an amazing job - he made it the exact opposite of what you would expect from a Hollywood real-life disaster movie. It was detailed, realistic, no hollywood simplifications, no nonsense side-stories.

 checkmark  Despite the awful subject matter, it is the most accurate aviation movie I've ever seen. Only two exceptions: They show an A320 at the gate at one point, as well as during the climbout from EWR.

Quoting NWA742 (Reply 10):
I believe every American that saw 9/11 should see this film. It will bring you back

For that very reason, many Americans won't ever see it, by choice. My Dad is one of them, having been an A&P mechanic for UA (not in EWR) and worked many, many hours on 757s.

Quoting Charlienorth (Reply 14):
in my suburb the police and f.d. still can't communicate with each other.

For the love of god...WHY?????? That kills me.

A lot of us on the site may wonder what we could have done in that situation, given our various levels of flying and a/c knowledge. Myself included. But...watching the final minutes, and knowing what sort of speed/attitude the aircraft was in at that point, it made me realize there was nothing I could have done to save the flight, nor could anyone else. That flight was doomed as soon as those terrorists took over.

RIP to the 40 who were lost.  Sad


User currently offlineKay From France, joined Mar 2002, 1884 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1791 times:

Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):

I fully agree, this movie was made amazingly well, it was rivetting, disturbing, shocking, yet amazingly factual and genuine, staying away from the extavaganzas that Hollywood tends to create in its films. The moment I knew that a low-budget non-Hollywood movie about 9-11 was being shot, I knew it would be the one with the strongest impact, but I never suspected it would have that huge impact on me. A great piece.

Kay


User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1790 times:

Quoting Aaron747 (Reply 12):
To defeat the enemy, we must always understand exactly who they are.

To defeat the enemy, we need to know where to aim the miniguns.

I'm not particularly interested in legitimizing their fight by trying to be understanding, compassionate or sympathetic. You kill us, we will kill you back tenfold.


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13208 posts, RR: 77
Reply 23, posted (7 years 2 months 4 weeks ago) and read 1748 times:

Yeah, that really works doesn't Cfalk, remember the 'body counts' in Vietnam?

There were times when this plot could have been stopped, over some years, under two US Administrations.
The attack itself was brought forward by several weeks since the plotters feared they would be busted, perhaps after Mossauri was lifted on immigration charges.
But, against an embedded cell, living amongst us, it's intel and nothing else, military force is useless here.

Good intel prevented an attempt to cause carnage by blowing up the Strasbourg Christmas markets in 2000.
Good intel stopped several serious plots against the UK-but one, the July 7th 2005 one, got through.
This is the reality, there is no perfect defence.
But if you have a handle on likely terrorists, you have a chance.
There was no 'handle' on those who would do Sept 11th, what fragments of suspicion various agencies had, was not put together as a whole.
Even known Al Queda operatives entered to US to support the plot, just months before it happened.

If good intel requires a deep understanding of what might motivate terrorists, however mad, plain evil, we might think them, then it should be pursued.
Sept 11th was an attack against a state that had, by far, the most powerful military in the world, not short of Miniguns. The film as stated, does a very good job of showing the confusion, lack of communications, all through the massive array of military and civil agencies.
This was not incompetence, just that those running it were just unprepared for such an event.

The revelations at the end of film, sourced from the 9/11 report, must be like a punch in the gut for many in the US, no order to shoot-down hijacked aircraft was finally authorised until some time after UA93 had crashed, nearest fighters 100 miles away at that point.
All this from a system originally, in the military part at least, to manage the response/retaliation through a Soviet nuclear attack.

Clearly, from what we know from communications with some crew and pax, they did do something to try to gain control of the aircraft from the terrorists.
The fact that it crashed away from built up areas, suggests they got close to doing this-otherwhise the terrorist pilot fearing losing control, would have aimed at the nearest urban area, he never even got the chance to do that, thankfully.
Incredible courage from them, but the stark fact remains that if UA93 had left on time, it almost certainly would have reached it's target, likely the Capitol Building.

I've not bothered with that other '9/11' film, 'World Trade Centre', it got awful reviews here (unlike UA93), Nicholas Cage starring in it did not help either.


User currently offlineNWA742 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1731 times:

Quoting N174UA (Reply 20):
They show an A320 at the gate at one point, as well as during the climbout from EWR.

I think they showed that on the trailer only - but in the movie they just show a 757 take off and continue following it at a side angle until the gear goes up. Not sure though.

Quoting Cfalk (Reply 22):
To defeat the enemy, we need to know where to aim the miniguns.

I'm not particularly interested in legitimizing their fight by trying to be understanding, compassionate or sympathetic. You kill us, we will kill you back tenfold.

 checkmark 

I honestly don't give a sh*t about anything that comes out of their mouths - be it about our foreign policy, crimes against humanity, or whatever other reason they give for hating us, and this is for two reasons - A - whatever they say is likely to be complete and utter bullsh*t, and more importantly B - NOTHING justifies, and NOTHING is a valid reason for, the things that happened that day.

The only things we need to know about the enemy regarding "who they are" deal with their potential strategies in combat.




-NWA742


25 Post contains images Pawsleykat : I watched United 93 in school one day and was really badly affected by it... I have cried at a lot of movies but I felt so helpless for those passenge
26 Cfalk : Intel in the way you are talking is defencive. It is the last barrier before a strike, where with some luck and good intel work at the CIA, NSA andot
27 Post contains images Gunsontheroof : So attacking WTC and The Pentagon as a response to the U.S. actions you've mentioned (though I know you're in the "they hate our freedoms" crowd) isn
28 Post contains images NWA742 : And what crowd are you in - the "let's believe what the terrorists tell us" crowd? Get a clue, Gunsontheroof - the only thing able to cure their hate
29 TZ757300 : I still have some sort of feeling deep inside me that just won't let me watch this yet. It seriously brings me to the point of just bawling my eyes ou
30 Post contains links Gunsontheroof : I don't pay much attention to what the terrorists say. I'm more in the "relatively well acquainted with the history of U.S. foreign policy in the Mid
31 Nosedive : Personally, I think both of you missed the point. Humanizing someone, IMO, is showing the motives and emotion of a person. Getting inside his head, u
32 Falcon84 : ' Why am I not surprised by that? It didn't fill me with rage. Rage is what led those nuts to do what they did, dude, so they win if you feel that wa
33 Cfalk : Just look around at the vehomence we see in our own politics. The hateful stuff that is said - particularly from the loony fringes. People can work t
34 GDB : Cfalk, but the Sept 11th plotters formed up in Hamburg, Germany, the leading members studying like so many 1000's of others from the region, taking ca
35 Post contains images Nosedive : Yep, b/c all the loonies are on the left Ever read the Book of Numbers? Interesting summary, GDB. It looks like the outfit really doesn't care so muc
36 KaiGywer : Speaking of 9/11... I'm a foreigner, and I still love this song. Shows me why I am here [Edited 2007-06-27 03:42:40]
37 Falcon84 : Wrong. The perversion of Islam is a big part of the problem, not Islam itself. Just as the Nazis, and the KKK, and even the modern fundamentalist Chr
38 Post contains images L410Turbolet : Did really work with the Saudis, didn't it?
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