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Any Internship/job Advice For A New Graduate?  
User currently offlineWaterpolodan From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1649 posts, RR: 5
Posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2109 times:

I'm about to graduate in december with 2 majors, economics and international relations, and yet I have no idea of what sort of job I'm going to get next year. I was hoping anyone with either of these degrees could recommend any good places to look for a good paid internship or job, preferably in New Orleans or Miami. I didn't exactly work very hard in school, and my mediocre GPA is getting me increasingly stressed out that nobody will hire me or accept my application for an internship, so any advice you guys have would be greatly appreciated!

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAdam T. From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 957 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2104 times:

I recently graduated andIcan tell you is that job searching is a pain in the butt....my advice would be to start looking now and use any contacts you have to your advantage.....if you are bent on living in New Orleans or Miami then start looking now for jobs there, be flexible and have some sense of what type of job you want. Try different methods when applying for jobs and interviewing. I recently started a new approach to the way I do cover letters, make contact with potential employers, and interviewing after advice from family and friends and I think its helping (we'll see.....still waiting to hear back on a job I interviewed for last week).

Best of luck,

Adam


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39905 posts, RR: 75
Reply 2, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2093 times:

Waterpolodan:
Here is a related article you may find of interest.


http://www.theonion.com/content/news/summer_intern_already_forgotten


Klein, with his "friends and mentors" at Beacon Press.


BOSTON—University Of Maryland senior Dan Klein said Friday that his unpaid internship at Beacon Press Publishing was the "best experience of [his] life." He predicted that the long hours he spent filing, photocopying, and answering phones would eventually ensure him a position at the company when he graduates next spring

But the Monday morning after his last week in the office, nobody on the 17-person staff had any recollection of who Dan Klein was or what exactly he did there.

"We had an intern, of course, but I believe the name was Greg or Craig," said editor-in-chief Lynn Thaden, who walked by a smiling Klein every morning, and who had promised on two separate occasions to write him a "glowing" letter of recommendation. "He or she was getting ready for graduate studies."



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2089 times:

Quoting Waterpolodan (Thread starter):
I'm about to graduate in december with 2 majors, economics and international relations
Tell me, what kind of jobs were you thinking of when you decided on your majors? Did you actually think over (with an advisor) what kind of job would look for an Econ / International Relations major?

The son of a neighbor came to my house last week, looking for the same sort of advice to get into the corporate world. He had no clue. He had a BA and a Masters in Political Science and a BA in Sociology. 28 years old, and has been a professional student forever, and no practical experience. The only advice I could think of for him is to seek a job in either public relations or government relations (lobbyists, basically). But of course these jobs are rare.

I made somewhat the same mistake too. I graduated with a BA in Economics - but I soon learned my mistake and got an MBA, and since then I have gotten further BAs in Finance and Accounting.

There are hundreds of majors available when you get to college, but kids need to think (and most importantly, their parents and counselors need to provide guidance) about what the end-result is going to be. If you take a major in History, for example, all you can do is maybe teach school. Art majors will usually starve. A friend's daughter is a wonderfully talented artist and wanted to study art - I told her to study graphic design - a major that would use her skills but pointing it towards some kind of lucrative career.

Waterpolodan, I did not mean to come down on you in particular. At least 50% of all recent grads are in the same position. But I would use some of your remaining time at the university to talk with the guidance counselors there. That's what they are there for. Get them to work for you and identify careers that match your profile - ideally, he can tell you that such-and-such a company could be interested, and sometimes recruits from campus.

Good Luck.

(edited for spelling)

[Edited 2007-09-11 22:17:16]

User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4900 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2064 times:

Waterpolodan,

You have a good background and in today's market, you should have no problem finding a job. I wouldn't worry too much about your GPA either. In today's job market, employers are fighting each other over college grads.

A good place for you to consider would be interning in the Securities business. Talk to both the major broker dealers and asset managers, of which there are many in Miami on Brickell.

If you majored in International Relations and Economics, and can speak a foreign language, consider working for a Latin Bank or any Emerging Markets related Fund Manager. You can always do an MBA later if need be.

The types of jobs available are many. You could start as a sales assistant in Sales and Distribution, join as a trainee broker, or as trader assistant, entering trades and looking after positions. You could also work in the back office, helping with accounting and settlements, closing documentation and so on.

Your temperament is also important. Know thyself - if you are extroverted, you belong in the front office and will deal with people. If you are more 'techie' or introverted, you may find putting on the green eyeshades more to your liking.

In any case, these kinds of jobs will give you a really good picture of how the industry works, and help you decide what fits you best.

This is the best time to be looking as a college grad - be confident and upbeat, and you will get hired in no time at all.

[Edited 2007-09-12 01:20:36]

User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2038 times:

Quoting Waterpolodan (Thread starter):
I didn't exactly work very hard in school, and my mediocre GPA is getting me increasingly stressed out that nobody will hire me or accept my application for an internship, so any advice you guys have would be greatly appreciated!

Don't sweat the GPA just don't be afraid to take a job outside your target industry and for maybe less money than you had hoped. I am a business student myself, and a bad one at that. I got to where I needed a job. Now I work in law enforcement- for the time being. Jobs outside your field can be good resume builders. My job shows I can be trusted, I am very dependable, I can use good judgement, I can think on my feet, etc. Just learn how to articulate the qualities of the job you do get initially into positives for your dream employer.

If nothing else don't discount doing a short turn in the military. I have seen people without military experience passed over time and time again for people with lesser qualifications but 4 years in the military. Plus with a degree you could go in as an officer.


User currently offlineThreeIfByAir From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 698 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2026 times:

As a Economics major myself, I have to ***slightly*** dispute the notion that Economics is a useless major. It doesn't have much of a practical application to very many jobs (at the BA/BS level, anyways), but I've found it is a decent way to get in the door. A good deal of people (mistakenly) think Economics is the same as Business/Finance and will give you an interview, but they're never going to interview an English/History/Psych major no matter how nice their resume is. Getting in the door is the hard part. Once people know you don't suck, you can get a shot at an internal transfer/promotion.

And, don't work for the feds if you can help it. My 2 "internships" with different agencies were complete wastes of time and taxpayer money.

I can empathize - I was in your position at the beginning of this summer. It isn't easy. Try to hold out for a job you really like, not a job you feel like you have to take.


User currently offlineWaterpolodan From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1649 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2022 times:

Thank you, guys! Some very good advice and encouraging words. I'll naturally start first with the career center here at school, but it can't hurt to have some advice from people who don't have their heads up their ass all day  Wink. I think I'm a very social/personable sort of guy, so as long as I can get an interview I feel like I could have a decent chance. I'll let everyone know how it goes.

User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 1 month 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1992 times:

Quoting ThreeIfByAir (Reply 6):
As a Economics major myself, I have to ***slightly*** dispute the notion that Economics is a useless major.

It is certainly not useless. In fact, I would say that a solid grasp of economics has been the most beneficial thing in the world for my career, because economics is all about inter-relationships and how they fit together.

But 99% of the time, your first contact with a company will be with its Human Resources department, which are all staffed by dimwits who were probably Art majors and sociology majors themselves, come to think of it..., who have no clue of what economics means and how well it rounds out your education. I'm serious - in over 20 years of corporate life, I have yet to meet an HR department competant enough to place anyone more senior than a secretary, but they still get to screen for all the other jobs. And they look for Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Engineering, Law, and other majors like that, by-the-book.


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