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What Are The Products Of An Antimatter Fussion?  
User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 2415 times:

When an electron and positron come together, what is the outcome, what energy particles?


The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineIFEMaster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 2392 times:

Antimatter chopsticks. Don't cross them!:



User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 2, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 2389 times:

Do you want to build a warp drive?  Wink

User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9956 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 2389 times:
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As someone once put it, that question is "eminently Googleable":

http://physics.pdx.edu/~egertonr/ph311-12/pair-p&a.htm



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2351 times:

matter+antimatter=photons (generally of the gamma-ray energy level)


Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Reply 5, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2311 times:

So there is radiation no matter what...and here I was thinking that antimatter reactor would allow nuclear energy without radioactive waste...  Yeah sure


The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 6, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2290 times:

Quoting Lehpron (Reply 5):
and here I was thinking that antimatter reactor would allow nuclear energy without radioactive waste...

I see you're still working on that ultra-power supply for your PC.  biggrin 


User currently offlineArniePie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2284 times:

Quoting David L (Reply 6):
I see you're still working on that ultra-power supply for your PC.

Yeah, and it still won't be strong enough to run FSX without looking like a slide-show.



[edit post]
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 8, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2275 times:

Quoting David L (Reply 6):
I see you're still working on that ultra-power supply for your PC.

Too bad he'll need that ultra-long keyboard extension and a telescope for the screen...!


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14011 posts, RR: 62
Reply 9, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2271 times:

Quoting Lehpron (Reply 5):
So there is radiation no matter what...and here I was thinking that antimatter reactor would allow nuclear energy without radioactive waste... Yeah sure

In a matter-antimatter reaction, both particles convert completely into energy, which usually appears in the shape of high energy photons (gamma rays). This is actually a form of energy conversion, since mass is a form of energy as well, see E=mc^2).

Jan


User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2258 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 9):
This is actually a form of energy conversion, since mass is a form of energy as well, see E=mc^2).

To give a sense of the energies we're talking about, the Hiroshima nuclear bomb, at 15 kilotons TNT equivalent, released about 63,000,000,000,000 (63 trillion) joules of energy. To get the same energy from a matter-antimatter annihilation, you would have to mix just .35 mg matter with .35 mg antimatter. Mixing 70 mg of each yields as much energy as the US's most powerful nuclear warhead currently in service.



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3267 posts, RR: 16
Reply 11, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2256 times:

As I've always wondered, where can one find antimatter?


Yay Pudding!
User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2255 times:

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 11):
As I've always wondered, where can one find antimatter?

High-energy particle collisions. Alternately, the decay of certain isotopes generates positrons (antielectrons).



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 13, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2252 times:

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 11):
As I've always wondered, where can one find antimatter?

Nowhere near, fortunately!

Antimatter is only synthesized in the lab - and even there usually just particle by particle, much rarer and more difficult a few atoms made up of those particles.

The energy invested into the huge accelerators and other machinery to create them by far exceeds the energy resulting in the antimatter particles annihilating themselves on contact with regular matter...

It's barely enough to confirm some basic properties, but certainly not enough to do actual macroscopic damage.


User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3267 posts, RR: 16
Reply 14, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 2240 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 13):
Nowhere near, fortunately!

Well damn, I need something for my dylithium chamber project...



Yay Pudding!
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14011 posts, RR: 62
Reply 15, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2222 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 13):
Nowhere near, fortunately!

Antimatter is only synthesized in the lab - and even there usually just particle by particle, much rarer and more difficult a few atoms made up of those particles.

The main problem is how to store the anti matter, since any contact with regular matter will result in spectacular fireworks. A recent development is a magnetic trap, in which individual antimatter ions are suspended in a magnetic field, to facilitate study.

Quoting Yellowstone (Reply 10):
To give a sense of the energies we're talking about, the Hiroshima nuclear bomb, at 15 kilotons TNT equivalent, released about 63,000,000,000,000 (63 trillion) joules of energy. To get the same energy from a matter-antimatter annihilation, you would have to mix just .35 mg matter with .35 mg antimatter. Mixing 70 mg of each yields as much energy as the US's most powerful nuclear warhead currently in service.

Don't forget that in the Hiroshima bomb maybe at maximum 5% of the nuclear fuel actually reacted before the heat blew the rest of the bomb apart and so stopped the reaction. Then, nuclear fision is using only part of the total mass to be converted into energy. Most of the total mass remains in form of fission products.

A pure matter-anti,atter reaction will leave no matter products, all mass will be converted into energy (photons). Unlike fission or fusion, there will also be no free neutrons roaming around to irradiate materials.

Jan


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 16, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 2213 times:

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 14):
Well damn, I need something for my dylithium chamber project...

When you've got your dilithium crystals already, I'm sure many physicists would be most fascinated and interested in dropping by...!

After all, controlled matter/antimatter reactions are pretty much the strongest energy source we could think of. Unfortunately the military would probably be among the first to have an "application"...  yuck 


User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 2182 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 16):
When you've got your dilithium crystals already, I'm sure many physicists would be most fascinated and interested in dropping by...!

Actually, a common exercise in chemistry classes when molecular orbitals are introduced is to see if dilithium can exist (i.e. if it is energetically favorable for two lithium atoms to bond). In fact, it can.



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14011 posts, RR: 62
Reply 18, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 2167 times:

Quoting Yellowstone (Reply 17):
Quoting Klaus (Reply 16):
When you've got your dilithium crystals already, I'm sure many physicists would be most fascinated and interested in dropping by...!

Actually, a common exercise in chemistry classes when molecular orbitals are introduced is to see if dilithium can exist (i.e. if it is energetically favorable for two lithium atoms to bond). In fact, it can.

Sure, you are filling up the 2s orbitals, which become energetically stable if they are occupied by two electrons.
since lithium has 3 electrons, the 1s orbital is fully occupied, while the 2s orbital only contains one electron. To become energetically stable, it needs another electron. This is why it reacts as a alkaline metal. Lithium is very willing to bond with any other element, which can donate another electron, e.g. oxygen or any halogene element.
Lithium is, at room temperature, a metallic solid with a cristalline structure. In this form all the 1s electrons will migrate through the whole cristall as an electron gas and thus stabilise he individual atoms. In gas form I could imagine lithium to form two atom molecules, just like hydrogen, the only caveat would be if the thermic energy at this temperature would exceed the bonding energy between the two atoms.

Jan


User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Reply 19, posted (6 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2127 times:

Quoting David L (Reply 6):
I see you're still working on that ultra-power supply for your PC.

I will concede that that was humorous. Big grin

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 9):
In a matter-antimatter reaction, both particles convert completely into energy, which usually appears in the shape of high energy photons (gamma rays).



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 15):
A pure matter-anti,atter reaction will leave no matter products, all mass will be converted into energy (photons). Unlike fission or fusion, there will also be no free neutrons roaming around to irradiate materials.

It was my understanding that gamma rays can kill us, but if lack of free nuetrons means no irradiated materials; could land decimated by an antimatter bomb be rebuilt upon in a decent amount of time, unlike with a regular nuke, waiting thousands of years? Or we simply do not have the understanding to even guess at those conclusions?



The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
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