Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Taking The LSAT. . .  
User currently offlineFoppishbum From Taiwan, joined Mar 2006, 809 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1371 times:

Next Saturday is gonna be a BIG day. It still seems like four months of preparation wasn't enough for me  cry  . As if that's not bad enough, I was assigned to Hastings College of Law in San Francisco to take the test (driving from Davis to San Francisco takes about 1 hour and 20 minutes without traffic) and the latest check-in time is 8:30AM. Since my GPA is not as high, I need to do extremely well in this test in order to get in my 1st choice law school. Talk about pressure! Next Saturday determines my near future  faint  . Say...do you guys know anyone attending Chicago-Kent College of Law? That's actually my first choice...but I don't know if I'm good enough  banghead  . Bah, stress, stress, and more stress. . .  Sad


peace..
wes


I'm a TAIWANESE-American living in NYC and LA.
52 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6306 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1368 times:

Sorry buddy, but you sound like one of those Pre-Law people who thinks the LSAT and your choice in law school determines everything in your life. Aim for a mid-tier school...firms look at your Bar score and your rank...and unless you're going to attend Harvard or Stanford or Virginia, it doesn't matter much...go someplace where 1) you won't have a lot of debt, 2) you will have FUN, and 3) you will rank well at.

As far as the LSAT...it's really not that hard of a test. I wasn't pre-law, I never took a law class, I never took an LSAT prep, or looked at an LSAT book, and I was an aero engineering major...yet I scored a 155. Don't stress yourself...the idea that the LSAT is the hardest test you will ever take is a flat out lie.


User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1359 times:

Quoting SW733 (Reply 1):
and I was an aero engineering major...

I was an A&P mechanic at the time I took the test. I did have some extra cash lying around so I took a test prep class....what it did was prove to me the clock speed of my brain. I predicted my score on the test within one point.

People do obsess about it. It's what you don't know right now that will make all the difference in your life. I'm solo, no place in the world of law firms for a 48 year old rookie lawyer so I made my own way. I kill what I eat.

Feel free to drop me a line sometime and I'll tell you everything I know about the entire process.


User currently offlineSlovacek747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 1346 times:

I just got out of my Princeton Review class for the LSAT. I go twice a week. I agree with what people are saying and I am in the same boat you are man. My GPA isnt all that high because I focus on other things...like too much Anet so when I take it in December it will be a big day for me.

The test is hard and here is why...Time!.. Material speaking, if you have a half a brain and all day you can do well, but its not any walk in the park with the time limit... and if you HAVE to do well because your GPA isnt the best it can be very stressful. I'm looking at smaller, less well known schools where I actually have a chance.. Good luck on your test this weekend.

Slovacek747


User currently offlineFoppishbum From Taiwan, joined Mar 2006, 809 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1320 times:

Quoting SW733 (Reply 1):
you sound like one of those Pre-Law people who thinks the LSAT and your choice in law school determines everything in your life.

Maybe not the choice of law school but LSAT. It's pretty much 50% of the index score and frankly my GPA is horrendous hence the importance of LSAT score  cry  . But yea, I would totally go to any law school if they accept me. Sigh. . .


peace,
wes



I'm a TAIWANESE-American living in NYC and LA.
User currently offlineTexan From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 4274 posts, RR: 52
Reply 5, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1302 times:

Dude, relax about the LSAT some. If you are decent at working under a time constraint, you will do fine. I read in some book that the LSAT does a great job of predicting how you will do in taking the LSAT, but not how you will do in law school. I took it a couple years removed from school, didn't take a prep course, and ended up at one of my top choices. Try to go in relaxed. Expect to get some rejection letters, but don't let it bring you down. Apply to many different places, and pick one or two schools that you will be very likely to get into (unlike, say, Michigan and Texas, my first two choices  Wink). Law school will be a lot of what you make of it. I am extremely happy where I have ended up. I love the area, my professors are amazing, and I have met some of the coolest and nicest people in the world.

Good luck!

Texan



"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6306 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1291 times:

Quoting Foppishbum (Reply 4):
It's pretty much 50% of the index score and frankly my GPA is horrendous hence the importance of LSAT score

All right, but, don't let this test determine your life. If you go into this saying "my whole life depends on this test", you will not do well...you will have put too much pressure on yourself. Go into it saying "it's important, but if I don't do law school, life goes on". That's what my buddy did and ended up with a Ivy League worthy score (but chose a Big 10 school instead for a free ride).


User currently offlineHuskyAviation From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 1152 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1283 times:

The best thing you can do is try to relax and work steadily. Even though you've practiced taking tests, make sure that on exam day you don't get bogged down and panic when 1 or 2 questions seem too difficult.

One little piece of advice--if you simply don't know an answer, and have to guess, mark it down on the sheet right away before going to the next question. Don't leave it blank and tell yourself that you will go back at the end. I had a friend that did that, forgot to leave a blank space, and then promptly filled in his answer for the wrong question 17 straight times and didn't realize it till he got to the last question. He didn't have time to go back and erase and re-fill in the answers. It wasn't good! So before you move on, just fill in your best guess (I usually pick "C").

Everyone's advice on here about it not being the end of the world--it's true. Even if you don't get your first choice law school (I was very very lucky) you will find a school that is perfect for you! So go into the test with a "I'm gonna kick some ass" attitude and don't worry about the future.  Smile GOOD LUCK!!

Quoting SW733 (Reply 1):
firms look at your Bar score and your rank

Actually firms don't look at your bar score, since you're hired long before taking the bar. They don't look at LSAT scores either--most often, it's class rank, law school GPA, resume/work experience, and cover letters.


User currently offlineMaidensGator From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 945 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1283 times:

Quoting Foppishbum (Thread starter):
I was assigned to Hastings College of Law in San Francisco to take the test (driving from Davis to San Francisco takes about 1 hour and 20 minutes without traffic) and the latest check-in time is 8:30AM.

Get a hotel Firday night... that's pretty much a no brainer if this really is so important to your life choices...

Quoting Foppishbum (Reply 4):

Maybe not the choice of law school but LSAT. It's pretty much 50% of the index score

More like 80% at a lot of schools... seems crazy that this 4 hour test counts so much more than your 4 years of college... But if your grades aren't that great, this is your chance to make up for that...

Quoting Texan (Reply 5):
If you are decent at working under a time constraint, you will do fine

That's the key. Take a stopwatch and keep checking how you are on time. Most people do poorly for the questions they left blank, not the ones they marked wrong. If there are 25 questions in 35 minutes, you HAVE to mark 5 answers every 7 minutes. Once you get behind, you'll never catch up...

Quoting Texan (Reply 5):
I took it a couple years removed from school, didn't take a prep course, and ended up at one of my top choices.

Same here, two years after I finished undergrad, no prep except the practice test in the application booklet, and scored 170... Got in to my only choice...

The key is time management and being rested/relaxed. I'd seriously consider the hotel... Good luck...



The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.
User currently offlineFoppishbum From Taiwan, joined Mar 2006, 809 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1249 times:

Quoting Texan (Reply 5):
Dude, relax about the LSAT some.

Maybe it's time for some meditation...hahah. I heard that's useful but never tried it out. I think reading the prep books like Kaplan or Princeton Review makes me worry 'bout the test. But other than that, I'm alright...I think. I'm pretty sure on the test date I'll be fine...just that I get nervous easy beforehand    .

Quoting SW733 (Reply 6):
If you go into this saying "my whole life depends on this test", you will not do well...you will have put too much pressure on yourself.

Seems like I need some attitude adjustment...haha. Thanks for the advice. I'll adopt the "I'm gonna kick some ass" attitude suggested by Husky   .

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 7):
So before you move on, just fill in your best guess (I usually pick "C").

That's funny!!   I usually pick C too! Hahaha. Except, most of the time I already eliminated C because they're obviously wrong. So then I don't know what else to pick    .

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 7):
So go into the test with a "I'm gonna kick some ass" attitude and don't worry about the future.  GOOD LUCK!!

Thanks!   Now I need to practice saying it....I'm gonna kick some ass. I'm gonna kick some ass.

Quoting MaidensGator (Reply 8):
Get a hotel Firday night... that's pretty much a no brainer if this really is so important to your life choices...

Easier said than done, man. I checked the hotels a month ago and they were all booked. The only options I had was one night $200 bucks or one night $1400 bucks. Don't have the money to afford that thus I contacted my aunt living in San Jose and asked if I could stay the night. That'll cut the drive time down by half. So now I have to leave at 7am instead of 6am.  Smile

Quoting MaidensGator (Reply 8):
More like 80% at a lot of schools...

Geez...that helps a lot with the stress    . But thanks anyway, more reasons to study a whole lot more   . Sigh. . .


peace,
wes

[Edited 2007-09-24 20:19:43]


I'm a TAIWANESE-American living in NYC and LA.
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 10, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1241 times:

Quoting SW733 (Reply 1):
firms look at your Bar score and your rank..

Firms absolutely do not look at the Bar Score. It is the ultimate pass/fail exam.

Quoting SW733 (Reply 1):
yet I scored a 155.

I scored 156 on the first diagnostic at TestMasters, which was an old LSAT under similar test conditions. By the time I was done with the prep course, I had scored a 171.

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 7):
most often, it's class rank, law school GPA, resume/work experience, and cover letters.

People who say that school attended isn't looked at are lying to themselves. The difference between even the top, middle and bottom of the top tier is even noticable. Class rank does matter the most (and since GPA determines rank, they go hand in hand), but someone in the bottom quartile at Harvard, Berkeley or NYU is going to get the same job as someone in the top 5 at Pepperdine.

Quoting MaidensGator (Reply 8):

Get a hotel Firday night... that's pretty much a no brainer if this really is so important to your life choices...

Without a doubt follow this advice.

Quoting Foppishbum (Reply 9):
I think reading the prep books like Kaplan or Princeton Review makes me worry 'bout the test.

I wholeheartedly recommend TestMasters (Score Perfect in Texas) as the test prep company of choice. The way they teach that test is so easy and intuitive.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlinePope From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1239 times:

Before you take the LSAT, you might want to take a look at today's WSJ that has an article on the large (and growing) number of underemployed attorneys who are struggling to find jobs that pay them enough to cover their law school debt.

User currently offlineFoppishbum From Taiwan, joined Mar 2006, 809 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1232 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 10):
I wholeheartedly recommend TestMasters (Score Perfect in Texas) as the test prep company of choice.

I'm taking the TestMasters course in Davis. Today is the last day of the class. Though I find them very helpful, I only improved single digit  banghead  . That just shows my incompetence for LSAT  cry  .

Quoting Pope (Reply 11):
Before you take the LSAT, you might want to take a look at today's WSJ that has an article on the large (and growing) number of underemployed attorneys who are struggling to find jobs that pay them enough to cover their law school debt.

I understand that a person needs money to survive but, to be honest, my decision for law school isn't for the glorious life many imagine an attorney has. And frankly, my parents have agreed to help me out for my law school education so that'll reduce the burden a whole lot. I was originally a Biochemistry & Molecular Biology major (thus the bad GPA caused by organic chemistry classes) but it wasn't until the end of my junior year that I realised I have more interest in law than in medicine. I might sound like a nerd but reading the supreme court cases and decisions is a fun activity  tongue  . So I guess my decision for law school is cus of my interest and many other reasons. Anyway, thanks for the advice, now the pressure is on!  tongue  Good LSAT, decent school, good law GPA, then get a decent job...hah. Seriously! Reality is so cruel!!


peace,
wes



I'm a TAIWANESE-American living in NYC and LA.
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 13, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1222 times:

Quoting Foppishbum (Reply 12):
That just shows my incompetence for LSAT

Don't be so hard on yourself. The reason I did so well on the exam is because I didn't take it all that seriously. If you relax a bit, you will do so much better than you think.

Quoting Foppishbum (Reply 12):
I understand that a person needs money to survive but, to be honest, my decision for law school isn't for the glorious life many imagine an attorney has.

Good. That is why I am a lawyer, why Halls120 is a lawyer and why lots of other people who truly love what they do are. The ones who go because they think they will print money and for no other reasons are the ones who burn out and leave the profession.

Quoting Foppishbum (Reply 12):
I was originally a Biochemistry & Molecular Biology major (thus the bad GPA caused by organic chemistry classes)

Law School admissions offices understand the difficulty of hard science majors and do take that into account.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineHuskyAviation From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 1152 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1204 times:

Quoting Pope (Reply 11):
Before you take the LSAT, you might want to take a look at today's WSJ that has an article on the large (and growing) number of underemployed attorneys who are struggling to find jobs that pay them enough to cover their law school debt.

Having a JD opens a lot of doors for you--I know a lot of non-practicing attorneys that work in all kinds of fields, like politics, lobbying, finance, etc. There are many, many things that you can do with a law degree--it's not all about arguing before a judge. I'm not a litigator, never have been, never will be, but I love what I do.


User currently offlinePope From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1194 times:

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 14):
Having a JD opens a lot of doors for you--I know a lot of non-practicing attorneys that work in all kinds of fields, like politics, lobbying, finance, etc. There are many, many things that you can do with a law degree--it's not all about arguing before a judge. I'm not a litigator, never have been, never will be, but I love what I do.

No argument from me. I was just highlighting a recent article that might be relevant to the analysis of someone deciding to go to law school.


User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6306 posts, RR: 9
Reply 16, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1182 times:

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 7):
Actually firms don't look at your bar score, since you're hired long before taking the bar. They don't look at LSAT scores either--most often, it's class rank, law school GPA, resume/work experience, and cover letters.



Quoting N1120A (Reply 10):
Firms absolutely do not look at the Bar Score. It is the ultimate pass/fail exam.

This is why I am not a law school student.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 10):
I scored 156 on the first diagnostic at TestMasters, which was an old LSAT under similar test conditions. By the time I was done with the prep course, I had scored a 171.

Good job, want a damn cookie?  duck 


User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1176 times:

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 14):
Having a JD opens a lot of doors for you--I know a lot of non-practicing attorneys that work in all kinds of fields, like politics, lobbying, finance, etc. There are many, many things that you can do with a law degree--it's not all about arguing before a judge. I'm not a litigator, never have been, never will be, but I love what I do.

Let me preface this by saying that a lot of people who describe themselves as litigators really aren't-they're compulsive filers of burdensome and onerous motions and discovery but their real bottom line is brokering settlements. Hell, if they had to go to court and argue something they'd lose their lunch.

I never took any of the course work because I figured like a lot of people "Me?! Not on your life." Then I was out of a job (long story) signed up for court appointments, and got my first case to deal with, a crazy lady forger with a brain toasted by meth. So you live and you learn and you apply yourself. After that I had a job as an assistant county attorney and I'd do 2 or 3 magistrate court trials every Wednesday. Speeding tickets, short bass tickets (yes Virginia, there is such a thing) and the like.

Five years later I caught a case where one of the local silk stocking law firms was trying to litigate a little guy to death. I singlehandedly fought them to a standstill. That told me I could do just about anything I put my mind to. The next year I tried a sex abuse case. Oh, I lost, the guy went to prison and all, but that scrubbed out the last vestige of stage fright I still had.

Court's like a stage, and it teaches you to be a performer. It's a sovereign remedy for wallflowers, it gives courage to the shy and winsome, and it takes the diffident and makes them into lions. I'm among the lions these days.


User currently offlineHuskyAviation From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 1152 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1169 times:

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 17):
Let me preface this by saying that a lot of people who describe themselves as litigators really aren't-they're compulsive filers of burdensome and onerous motions and discovery but their real bottom line is brokering settlements. Hell, if they had to go to court and argue something they'd lose their lunch.



Quoting Dougloid (Reply 17):
Court's like a stage, and it teaches you to be a performer. It's a sovereign remedy for wallflowers, it gives courage to the shy and winsome, and it takes the diffident and makes them into lions. I'm among the lions these days.

LOL, awesome, glad to hear that your experiences brought out the best in you! From my perspective, I would tend to agree with you about your opinion of many litigators, especially corporate litigators. I'm on the transactional side and have no desire to deal with litigation of any kind at any time (other than to be good at my job and help my clients avoid it  Smile) but that's just my preference. A lot of my friends from law school and in my office are litigators, and I think the transactional people are happier in general LOL  Wink


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 19, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1169 times:

Quoting SW733 (Reply 16):

This is why I am not a law school student.

Because the bar is a pass/fail exam? Why not? It takes 4 months after you take the bar in California to receive your score, and another couple to get admitted, if everything falls into place. Law firms need people working before that.

Quoting SW733 (Reply 16):

Good job, want a damn cookie?

Nah, I prefer Carrot Cake



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 20, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1167 times:

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 18):
I would tend to agree with you about your opinion of many litigators, especially corporate litigators.

That is because they have ceased to be real trial lawyers and have become the part of the innocuous litigator army

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 18):
A lot of my friends from law school and in my office are litigators, and I think the transactional people are happier in general

I disagree. My office is full of people who love the whole process of litigation, including getting to an arbitration or a trial, and everyone here is happy with what they do.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineHuskyAviation From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 1152 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1160 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 20):
That is because they have ceased to be real trial lawyers and have become the part of the innocuous litigator army

No doubt--the litigators in my office rarely see the inside of a courtroom--it takes years and years for stuff to get to trial, if it gets that far.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 20):
I disagree. My office is full of people who love the whole process of litigation, including getting to an arbitration or a trial, and everyone here is happy with what they do.

I was kinda speaking tongue-in-cheek  Wink I just prefer transactional because at least in the securities world things happen faster, all sides are (usually) friendly and working towards a common goal, there is instant gratification when the deal closes, and everyone walks away happy. I don't really have the stomach for litigation myself, but others love it. Better them than me!  Smile


User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6306 posts, RR: 9
Reply 22, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1156 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 19):
Because the bar is a pass/fail exam? Why not?

Because I don't know anything about the bar.

And because lawyers annoy the hell out of me  Wink  duck 


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 23, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1154 times:

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 21):
it takes years and years for stuff to get to trial, if it gets that far.

Yeah, those kinds of cases are grinders. Here in California state civil court, which is where all of our cases are, they are actually very good at getting things to trial within 13 months, unless it reaches a negotiated or mediated agreement beforehand.

Quoting HuskyAviation (Reply 21):

I was kinda speaking tongue-in-cheek Wink I just prefer transactional because at least in the securities world things happen faster, all sides are (usually) friendly and working towards a common goal, there is instant gratification when the deal closes, and everyone walks away happy. I don't really have the stomach for litigation myself, but others love it.

I have a good friend from law school who is doing anti-trust and securities litigation in New York and absolutely loves it (I would love her paycheck, but I like what I do a lot better).  Silly



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineHuskyAviation From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 1152 posts, RR: 4
Reply 24, posted (6 years 10 months 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1148 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 23):
Yeah, those kinds of cases are grinders. Here in California state civil court, which is where all of our cases are, they are actually very good at getting things to trial within 13 months, unless it reaches a negotiated or mediated agreement beforehand.

13 months isn't too bad...one of the big federal litigation cases going on in our office has been going on for almost 7 years. Something like 13 million documents have changed hands during discovery.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 23):
I have a good friend from law school who is doing anti-trust and securities litigation in New York and absolutely loves it (I would love her paycheck, but I like what I do a lot better).

The anti-trusters, tax, and bankruptcy folks are usually an odd lot of people. The partner in our office that handles all of our security interest opinions firmwide is one of the smartest, and most eccentric, people I've ever met. He's heavily into the metaphysical aspects of law, which is just fine by me except when he delays signing off on an opinion that he himself drafted for some random reason.


25 MaidensGator : I've done that litigating against some big companies or insurance companies. Some of them paper you to death, and then trial day comes, they pay up.
26 Nosedive : While demographics can tell you many things, if you do everything by economic forecast, you'd have your dreams dashed every couple of years. The nice
27 Pope : I don't disagree, however, it would be foolish to rush into something without understanding the precise risk / reward matrix that one can expect. Cer
28 Post contains images Foppishbum : I personally don't believe there is such a thing as "wrong choice". To be honest, even if the choice seems wrong, a person definitely learn from the
29 N1120A : Yeah, that is the army of litigators thing again. I can't imagine doing that kind of work. Yeah, take everything to mediation first as well. Usually,
30 Dougloid : It's true....By the time you set up for jury selection the hard work is already done and your job is to get people to tell their story. I think what
31 Post contains images RJpieces : Ahhh the LSAT. I have a lot of friends taking it this Saturday... Out of curiousity, what was that? Nice...Where did you go to law school? With a 171,
32 N1120A : Something like that It all depends on what the person wants. I know a lot of solo practitioners who make a lot more money than big firm partners and
33 RJpieces : That just seems like an insane salary for a 25-year old... So what kind of law are you practicing exactly? How are your hours? Did you like it? Was i
34 Continental : Apparently the Kaplan books help. My brother practiced with the Kaplan books starting last fall, took the test in February and got a 177. He studied S
35 HuskyAviation : A lot of firms went up to $160,000 for 1st year associates in DC and NY. My partner is a lobbyist, but not a lawyer. His boss is a woman who has a JD
36 Post contains images Foppishbum : A JD seems to open a lot of roads. My cousin got a JD at University at Buffalo and he's doing VERY well now. He did get through a tough time at the fi
37 Post contains images N1120A : Until you need us Think about it this way. That 25 year old will have spent at least 7 years getting higher education, $200,000 if they are lucky, ta
38 Post contains images MaidensGator : I went to the University of Florida College of Law. It was my only choice because when I went to law school, I had a wife, kids, dog, house, etc., an
39 Pope : I think the key thing to remember is that a very small portion of the 40,000+ annual graduates from US law schools end up at top tier NY law firms.
40 N1120A : Not only the New York firms pay as that much. As a general rule, New York, Los Angeles, D.C., Houston, San Francisco and Boston pay at the top.
41 Planespotting : Good luck on the LSAT - I took it twice when I was in graduate school, and canceled my score the second time. That turned out to be a good move, becau
42 Dougloid : Reminds me of a time back in the day when I went to the local Ford plant on Vineyard Road and applied for a job. Just out of high school and they wer
43 HuskyAviation : I agree with that, working for a large, international firm means you have to work hard, it comes with the territory. Anyone that thinks otherwise is
44 N1120A : See, I don't see that as the case. The people I talk to are still getting run through the works, especially at places like Skaddon, Schulte, etc. Tho
45 HuskyAviation : Well, working at a very large firm, I can only speak from my own experience, but they are making a conscious effort to get away from the sweatshop me
46 Dougloid : I'm a freelancer and here where the cost of living is low the usual and customary rate is between $100 and $300 per hour and that includes the local
47 HuskyAviation : Well, I'm more expensive than you LOL, but certainly not because of experience in the profession. I bill out in the $210-250/hr range, and it goes up
48 CaptOveur : So what is your backup plan? I know more than a few people who had 3.8 - 4.0 GPAs in fields like accounting, info systems, even engineering and did r
49 IADCA : This advice is perfect. Remember also that a fair number of schools have programs under which they will forgive all or part of your loans if you work
50 Post contains images HuskyAviation : Very true. I worked for a couple of years as a legal assistant before going to law school, and I found that the people who went straight from college
51 Post contains images Foppishbum : Thanks for wishing me good luck... I took the test and it was horrible. I couldn't determine whether my answer choice was the right one. Blah, I'll ju
52 N1120A : Actually, the friend in question was 23 at graduation. She did a 6 year combined BA/JD.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Taking The Girlfriend Spotting, Mistake? posted Fri Jul 14 2006 03:00:15 by Cadet57
I'm Taking The Girls To See "Cars" Tonight posted Fri Jun 16 2006 17:20:32 by Tom in NO
Taking The GRE posted Sun Sep 18 2005 14:01:05 by Mrniji
So Who's Taking The SAT Tomorrow? posted Fri May 6 2005 23:25:32 by Jfkaua
Taking The ROC-Toronto Ferry Today posted Sat Jun 19 2004 19:28:04 by LHMark
Taking The Mickey Out Of Your Boss posted Thu Apr 1 2004 00:07:15 by Lucky727
Taking The P**s posted Fri Mar 14 2003 09:07:29 by Saintsman
Klusener Taking The Attack To Windies posted Sun Feb 9 2003 21:03:49 by Donder10
D'u Feel Shy Taking The Shower Naked After Sports? posted Thu May 16 2002 13:14:45 by F.pier
Taking The Mickey Out Of Politicians posted Mon May 13 2002 15:06:15 by G-KIRAN