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Why Scania Do Not Sell Their V8 Trucks In The US?  
User currently online747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3734 posts, RR: 2
Posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

I accidentally came across a Scania truck with one of there huge V8, when I was trying to find a Cat V8 on youtube.
These truck with those V8 sound like beast! They would give a Peterbuild a run for there money. I also fold out that those V8 are 16 liter, that's a BIG V8. Why there no Scania Trucks are sold in the United States? Volvo import truck here but they are too quite. I who love to here the sound of one of those Scania trucks on US roads, heck if I had the money I would import one here.


Check This out!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYsOgrlQ_m0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hvzd7Ka5geY

Wow! Now those are BEAST!  Big grin

68 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBok269 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 2104 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Because they have determined there is not a market for them here?

Because emmissions regulations prohibit it?

Just speculation, but for any why-not import question related to cars, its usually one of the above.



"Reality is wrong, dreams are for real." -Tupac
User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13170 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

I believe that Scandia did import some heavy trucks in the late 1980's-early 1990's to the USA, mainly on the East coast. Most of the ones I saw ended up used as straight heavy dump trucks, like for construction, paving work. Probably they couldn't compete with USA brands in that class like Mack, International, Peterbuilt, Kenworth.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29813 posts, RR: 58
Reply 3, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

I would assume that they don't meet US DOT safety standards, but rather the European standard.

That would prevent them from being sold here. There is a reason why Volvo's are just rebranded Autocars and Mercedes Benz built their plant in North Carolina.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently online747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3734 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 2):
Probably they couldn't compete with USA brands in that class like Mack, International, Peterbuilt, Kenworth.

Look at that 16 liter V8 engine, believe me they could compete.


User currently offlineSJCRRPAX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

I believe there is a 25% imporft tariff on trucks, to protect what is considered a critical industry by the USA. Of course some of you wouldn't mind if all American companies went under and the US military had to import trucks from China, Air Tankers from France, ships from Korea, Ferry Boats from Austrailia, cars from Japan. Heck we don't need to make anything anymore. (I guess I got off topic --- hopefully I didn't hijack the thread)

User currently offlineCupraIbiza From Australia, joined Feb 2007, 837 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

another possible reason could be production constraints. That is Scania couldn't build enough trucks to viably enter the US market. Just an idea

Quoting SJCRRPAX (Reply 5):
25% imporft tariff on trucks,



Quoting SJCRRPAX (Reply 5):
Ferry Boats from Austrailia,

Really still that high? Australia dropped almost all its tariff barriers to a meaningless 5% years ago. Whilst it inflicts a lot of pain it ensures that the industries that survive deserve to survive and that new world class industires (such as naval ferry construction) develop and flourish



Everyday is a gift…… but why does it have to be a pair of socks?
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26709 posts, RR: 75
Reply 7, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Bok269 (Reply 1):

Because emmissions regulations prohibit it?

Almost certainly not the issue.

Quoting L-188 (Reply 3):


I would assume that they don't meet US DOT safety standards, but rather the European standard.

I doubt there is a difference.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Is it a power issue? Those damned things seem to always be going well below the speed limit in Europe.

[Edited 2007-09-27 06:25:03]

User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11153 posts, RR: 59
Reply 9, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting SJCRRPAX (Reply 5):
I believe there is a 25% imporft tariff on trucks, to protect what is considered a critical industry by the USA.

It's 25% import tariffs on pick-ups and light trucks, not these large heavy trucks.



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12263 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 32767 times:
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Quoting AsstChiefMark (Reply 8):
Is it a power issue? Those damned things seem to always be going well below the speed limit in Europe.

That's because EU regulates that all semi trucks can go no faster than 90 km/h and buses no more than 100 km/h. They all have governors. Also, the speed and time is recorded on a form inside your speedometer, so no faking logs there.



“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, an
User currently offlineSJCRRPAX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 2 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting BA (Reply 9):

It's 25% import tariffs on pick-ups and light trucks, not these large heavy trucks.

From the more useless information found on the internet....

Well I have never imported a truck of that size, but it seems from this government document on page 68 that the EU has an import fee of 22% on heavy trucks, so I would assume we in the USA would reciprocate .... but I could be wrong.


http://www.ita.doc.gov/td/auto/international/importreq/TBR2006.pdf


User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 7):
Quoting Bok269 (Reply 1):

Because emmissions regulations prohibit it?

Almost certainly not the issue.

You might be surprised. Emissions regs on heavy trucks have been getting stupid in recent years. It is possible they just don't want to mess with it.


User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3267 posts, RR: 16
Reply 13, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 12):
Emissions regs on heavy trucks have been getting stupid in recent years.

Ain't that the truth.

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
I who love to here the sound of one of those Scania trucks on US roads

There are a few reasons why that won't happen. I just looked at the Scania website, and I don't see any conventional tractors. To sell any trucks here, they would have to have a conventional tractor. No one is really buying cabovers these days. On the other hand, in Europe, I don't think I've ever seen a conventional tractor over there. I doubt it would be in Scania's best interest to develop a conventional for one market.

Also of importance, is fuel economy. It is a big issue for the airlines, it is also a huge issue for trucking operations. Large companies are and have been opting for the smaller, more fuel efficient engines. They also prefer their choice of engines. If Scania had options for other engines in their trucks, they might also see some interest. Then they would have to develop a way to include those engines in their lineup, that most likely, the Europeans won't probably use.

It's all about the bottom line. It would be a losing proposition for them.





[Edited 2007-09-27 18:24:28]


Yay Pudding!
User currently offlineAjd1992 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting AsstChiefMark (Reply 8):
Is it a power issue? Those damned things seem to always be going well below the speed limit in Europe.

In the UK at least, maximum speed is 56mph. It's basically to save on fuel, i think.

Busses and coaches are 65mph, for the same reason.


User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5741 posts, RR: 19
Reply 15, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 13):
On the other hand, in Europe, I don't think I've ever seen a conventional tractor over there.

Scania used to make one since the 1980s, did not sell too well though. Discontinued in early 2000s

http://www.scania.com/Images/D00077-1_tcm10-78334.jpg

http://www.scania.com/Images/04866-01_tcm10-78333.jpg


User currently offlinePelican From Germany, joined Apr 2004, 2531 posts, RR: 8
Reply 16, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 13):
Also of importance, is fuel economy. It is a big issue for the airlines, it is also a huge issue for trucking operations. Large companies are and have been opting for the smaller, more fuel efficient engines.

So why would European companies - especially with those much higher fuel prices here - opt for larger engines?

pelican


User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3958 posts, RR: 18
Reply 17, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
I accidentally came across a Scania truck with one of there huge V8, when I was trying to find a Cat V8 on youtube.
These truck with those V8 sound like beast! They would give a Peterbuild a run for there money. I also fold out that those V8 are 16 liter, that's a BIG V8. Why there no Scania Trucks are sold in the United States? Volvo import truck here but they are too quite. I who love to here the sound of one of those Scania trucks on US roads, heck if I had the money I would import one here.


Check This out!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYsOgrlQ_m0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hvzd7Ka5geY

Wow! Now those are BEAST!

If you had to drive one day in, day out like I had to do until recently, I think you'd soon change your tune!! I drive a V8 580hp myself on heavy haulage work and the engine is brilliant, there's no doubt about it, but I don't find them particularly comfortable to drive, although they're probably a lot better than the antiquated heaps of junk you run over there!!  duck 

This is my last one with a little Daewoo 45 tonner on the back.





And it used to sound like this when you put your right foot to the floor : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dq4iA46yPCk

 biggrin 

R


User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting L-188 (Reply 3):

That would prevent them from being sold here. There is a reason why Volvo's are just rebranded Autocars and Mercedes Benz built their plant in North Carolina.



The plants in N.C. were to build Freightliner trucks. Mercedes Benz hasn't sold trucks in the US under the M-B name in a number of years. There really isn't a need for M-B to sell their products here since they own Frieghtliner, Sterling, and Western Star, which covers pretty much the entire market range. The Sprinter is one of the few M-B products sold in the US, with the Unimog being the other. M-B did sell the Sprinter under their name briefly in the US before rebadging it as a Freightliner. Then they rebadged it as a Dodge (as the replacement for Dodge's Ram Van). Not sure what badge it may be wearing in the future since Dodge (along with Chrysler and Jeep) is no longer part of Daimler.

Perhaps Scania is barred from selling their vehicles in the US as part of the deal when GM bought out SAAB Automobile?


User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 19, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Pelican (Reply 16):
So why would European companies - especially with those much higher fuel prices here - opt for larger engines?

There is a lot more in the determination of how a truck fits into a company than just fuel.

The basic truck in the US has to be designed for hours and hours on the open road - the US freeway system where wind resistance and it's impact upon fuel economy are very important.

In Europe - the physical size - wheelbase length - of a truck built for US conditions could severely limit the ability of that vehicle in many places. The short wheelbase is one thing which stands out at first glance when I see trucks in Europe, also in Japan. The higher wind resistance of a flat front vehicle and additional fuel costs are minimal factors if the vehicle which uses less fuel won't fit into the required streets and terminals.

What are the grade requirements in Europe? Though we have some tough terrain, most of our US major highways are relatively easy on grades. If there is a requirement for steeper grades than the US, a larger engine which uses more fuel would be justified.

A lot of people don't like to admit it - but the physical size of the US and how spread out our nation is are major factors in the development of many, many products. From the way out airlines are structured to our vehicles to our lack of public ground transportation.

Trucks in the US are carry cargo's coast to coast. That's farther than Madrid to Moscow.

LA to NY is about 2,840 miles by road - and will be driven in a little less than 72 hours with rest stops - 43 hours if there is a two driver team in the truck.

The US is neither better nor worse than Europe or Asia - just different.

The Scania obviously fits the system in Europe very well.

It apparently doesn't fit into the US system.


User currently offlinePetertenthije From Netherlands, joined Jul 2001, 3389 posts, RR: 12
Reply 20, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 19):
It apparently doesn't fit into the US system.

This may be an ignorant question, but is coast to coast transport really that important? Certainly it will be a part, but most of the trucks will surely be doing short/medium haul? Something smaller could perhaps be interesting. And whle on subject of small trucks, Paccar owns (amongst others) DAF. Would the DAF truck be a good offer for the US market, possibly rebadged under a Paccar brand? Perhaps not the long range 95XF due to the above mentioned reasons, but perhaps the smaller CF and/or the LF?



Attamottamotta!
User currently offlineCheckraiser From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

There's some truths in this thread and a lot of misinformation. I'm a fleet superintendent for a (primarily) short-haul trucking company. Over the years we have owned and operated every brand of truck (except Western Star) and every engine option, save the M-B.

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
Why there no Scania Trucks are sold in the United States?

Probably a number of reasons. You can't start a dealer network overnight for starters. Secondly, imported trucks aren't often well-received. A number of players (especially from Asia) have tried to enter the North American truck market and have had limited success. One of those was Hyundai, they sold under a different brand (I can't remember what they were called, but the logo was a bear.) Hino ( a Toyota offshoot,) has had very limited success as well. Nissan tried selling trucks under the UD name, which was also a failure. Renault also fell flat on its face, even when they were rebadging them as Macks.

Fleets will also be very reluctant to be the "guinea pigs" for an unestablished brand. Heavy trucks are a big investment. Uptime is critical, who wants to gamble on an unknown brand when the current players in the market have proven that they can build quality equipment?

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
Volvo import truck here but they are too quite.

Volvo does not import trucks into North America. All Volvo trucks for the North American market are built in Dublin, VA. Volvo engines are quiet, but bear in mind that most of those Volvo trucks you see are Cummins powered. Volvo has offered its 12.0L engine for years and just very recently added a 16.0L. Still, most of the trucks have Cummins under the hood because that's what fleets demand. Volvo powered Volvos can be tough to sell, and knock about $5000 out of the resale value. Trust me, I'm trying to sell one now.

Quoting Bok269 (Reply 1):
Because emmissions regulations prohibit it?

One of the reasons. Maybe it could brought into compliance, maybe not. Contrary to popular belief, US diesel emission rules are tougher than those in the EU. The EU is starting to tighten the noose, but they're a few years behind.

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 13):
There are a few reasons why that won't happen. I just looked at the Scania website, and I don't see any conventional tractors. To sell any trucks here, they would have to have a conventional tractor.

 checkmark 

Quoting RobK (Reply 17):
although they're probably a lot better than the antiquated heaps of junk you run over there!!

I know if you came here and drove a NA spec truck you'd change your tune real fast. The typical American truck driver is quite pleased with the comfort level of their trucks.

Quoting L-188 (Reply 3):
There is a reason why Volvo's are just rebranded Autocars and Mercedes Benz built their plant in North Carolina.

Volvos aren't rehashed Autocars. White bought Autocar ages ago. Volvo got involved in a joint venture with GM in the mid-80's and bought White. Some time around 1995 Volvo bought GM out of the venture and started doing their own thing. Freightliner has two assembly plants in NC. Cleveland and Mt. Holly. Cleveland builds tractors and Mt. Holly builds medium duty. I believe both of those plants were there before the Germans owned Freightliner.

Quoting Srbmod (Reply 18):
There really isn't a need for M-B to sell their products here since they own Frieghtliner, Sterling, and Western Star, which covers pretty much the entire market range

It's a little better than half the market, but it should be noted that those makes are still pretty much unique in their own right. Climb in a Sterling and you'll see very little has changed since they were Ford. They even share the same radio as an F-150.

Daimler has been very careful to not do much platform sharing and keep these makes very distinct - the opposite of what Volvo has done to Mack since they bought them in 2001.

Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 19):

 checkmark   checkmark   checkmark 

Quoting Petertenthije (Reply 20):
This may be an ignorant question, but is coast to coast transport really that important?

Yes, you would be surprised at how much freight moves that distance via truck. The average length of haul is about 600 miles these days. That's considerable because of the amount of short-haul loads that are done each day. An American over the road truck driver covers much more ground than his European counterpart. It boils down to the sheer size of the US and a very good, relatively young highway system.

Quoting Petertenthije (Reply 20):
Paccar owns (amongst others) DAF. Would the DAF truck be a good offer for the US market, possibly rebadged under a Paccar brand?

Probably not. Paccar used to offer rebadged Brazilian built Volkswagen medium duty trucks in the US. They sold well, but had a lot of reliability issues and the drivers hated them.

If you're looking for sheer, all-out horsepower Caterpillar and Volvo offer engines with over 600 ponies. IMO, that's overkill unless you're doing heavy-haul and/or running in the mountains all the time. The typical late-model American tractor is 400-450 HP.

I do admit, the V8 Scania does sound bad-ass.


User currently offlineCaptOveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 13):
To sell any trucks here, they would have to have a conventional tractor. No one is really buying cabovers these days.

I may be wrong but if I recall it was the truck manufacturers who made a couple big fleets like JB Hunt and Schneider go to conventionals. For some strange reason those two rather large fleets apparently liked cab-overs.

Quoting Srbmod (Reply 18):
Mercedes Benz hasn't sold trucks in the US under the M-B name in a number of years.

Actually, fairly recently I saw what appeared to be a new Mercedes Benz tractor pulling something massive and heavy. I can't remember what it was, but I do recall being stunned to see a Mercedes Benz tractor. They must be selling them somewhere.

Quoting Petertenthije (Reply 20):
This may be an ignorant question, but is coast to coast transport really that important?

YES! Our coasts are the most densely populated parts of our country. It is important to be able to move crap between them.

Quoting Checkraiser (Reply 21):
Renault also fell flat on its face, even when they were rebadging them as Macks.

Anything had to be an improvement for the Mack brand.


User currently online747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3734 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

[quote=RobK,reply=17]If you had to drive one day in, day out like I had to do until recently, I think you'd soon change your tune!! I drive a V8 580hp myself on heavy haulage work and the engine is brilliant, there's no doubt about it, but I don't find them particularly comfortable to drive, although they're probably a lot better than the antiquated heaps of junk you run over there!!

This is my last one with a little Daewoo 45 tonner on the back.





And it used to sound like this when you put your right foot to the floor : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dq4iA46yPCk



R



Well I glad to hear from somebody who drive one of these trucks. I surprise that you do not like them. Why are they uncomfortable, if you do not mind me asking?


User currently offlineCheckraiser From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 22):
I may be wrong but if I recall it was the truck manufacturers who made a couple big fleets like JB Hunt and Schneider go to conventionals. For some strange reason those two rather large fleets apparently liked cab-overs.

JB Hunt started specing conventionals while the International Harvester cabover was still available. JB's decision to move to conventionals was the death of the cabover.

Schneider's reasoning most likely had to do with the increased manueverability and line of sight cabovers offer. Schneider has its own training program, thus many of their drivers are inexperienced.

Other than the manueveraility factor, I can't see why on earth anybody would choose to drive one. Since the steer axle is under your butt they ride like a haywagon. The engine take up precious room in the cab, is noisier due to it's close proximity, and throws off heat. It's a PITA to tilt the cab to perform engine work and they offer very little protection in a frontal collision. I understand why they're popular in Europe and Asia, but never got why any OTR operator would want them here.

Quoting CaptOveur (Reply 22):
Anything had to be an improvement for the Mack brand.

I should have elaborated before. The Renault imports were cabover medium duty models - a market Mack never entered with its own equipment. Renault never exported heavy duty units to the US. Mack may not have made the best OTR tractors, but they are well respected in the vocational field.


25 KaiGywer : Well, Volvo did. None of the Volvos sold here are sold (at least on a large scale) in Europe.
26 Post contains images Go3Team : When I first started driving, my first company was CRST. They were/are pretty big and also went the cabover route. When I was in training, they had j
27 WildcatYXU : In Europe it's an absolute necessity because of overall lengh limit of 15.5 m.
28 L-188 : I think that back in the 60-70's there where more lenght issues for trucks then today. I'll have to look, I know that one of our local haulers have s
29 747400sp : Isn't driving a cab over almost like driving a buses?
30 AC777LR : Cabovers, there is one thing for sure, in an accident you are the first one there. I think Schneider is replacing their cab overs with the Freightline
31 Post contains links and images JetMech : Nice stuff 747400sp! The Scandinavians build some awesome trucks! Volvo has a 16 litre straight six in their line up. The D16E in it's most powerful
32 Go3Team : I can't remember the last time I saw a Schneider cab over. Pretty close, although on the bus, the engine is in the back. We have trailers longer then
33 BA : No. In a cabover, the engine is located underneath the driver's seat. A bus has its engine located in the back, far away from the driver.
34 Post contains images Go3Team : Conventional Pros: More aerodynamic Easier to work on More floor space Better ride quality Cooler floor Cons: Heavier Larger turning radius Cab-over:
35 Post contains images JetMech : Thanks for that Go3Team ! If you want to give it a go, I suggest you Google mining companies such as BHP and Rio Tinto in Western Australia (WA). The
36 Post contains links and images Checkraiser : They're done. You also forgot to mention driver retention. The driver shortage is only getting worse - OTR companies need to do all they can to retai
37 Mika : Here in Sweden the legal limit is actually 24m, we have that as the only nation in the EU i believe.
38 Checkraiser : Do you see conventional tractors in Sweden?
39 Go3Team : I know what I need, $$$$$.
40 CaptOveur : Thats the problem, and the solution- but the larger problem is rising fuel costs. It is hard to give more money to the drivers when the number one va
41 Nitrohelper : Most of the US used to have an overall length limit (65') , that went away as part of the highway laws that allowed 80,000# instead of 73,000# and it
42 Go3Team : Oh yeah. Someone needing a load home will undercut everybody, just to get there. They are sent to Mexico, and I also read an article somewhere, where
43 Post contains images WildcatYXU : Now imagine that some European companies in order to save floor space for cargo are running trucks with the sleeper area above the driver...
44 Post contains images Go3Team : The one thing I've always wondered, is did they even have a sleeper. There isn't much room behind the driver, so I figured they didn't have sleepers.
45 WildcatYXU : Fully agree, Go3Team. European tractors definitely don't offer decent working and living conditions to the driver.
46 Bongodog1964 : One factor in the horsepower requirement, is that European trucks operate to higher weight limits than in the USA. We are now at either 40 or 44 tonne
47 Checkraiser : It's some of it, but it also goes much deeper than that. A successful company passes the fuel costs on to their customers via a fuel surcharge that c
48 Checkraiser : Not just cabovers but everything. Once it's not really fit for our roads any longer they are usually exported to Mexico, Central America and the Cari
49 Deskflier : Not since some 30-odd years. To try to answer the original question in the thread starter: It might be like this. When You market a product in the US
50 Post contains links and images KaiGywer : The majority has a single bed with a fold down bunk above it. This is a Volvo FH16:
51 747400sp : I think the city buses in Mexico still use Flixble New Look, and I know LAMTA and OCTD retired their Flixble New Looks in the early 90s. I now saying
52 Post contains images Go3Team : No place for a TV? No DVD player? No DVD storage? Not even a place for a cooler? What would I do to entertain myself when I'm trying to avoid work?
53 KaiGywer : Actually I think there's room for a TV (tiny one) above the windshield. Also storage up there. There is a fridge in many of them under the bed, acces
54 RIXrat : I enjoyed reading all of your posts. Being in Latvia, don't ask me why, I went for my company's sake to hunt down four used cab-overs for our use. The
55 Checkraiser : How many days the average European truck driver spend on the road? I could handle two or three days in that FH, but after that I'd be going stir crazy
56 Post contains images Srbmod : You weren't driving down I-75 in my neck of the woods the other day were you? I could have sworn I saw a rig just like that one (including the WOW st
57 Post contains links and images MCOflyer : That is a 70in Freightliner Coronado. Compare that to the cab over. Freightliner did make the Agora series for a limited time (02-05 I believe). They
58 Go3Team : I think I am on double secret probation. The only stuff I've been doing lately are these shitty 200-250 miles runs. I haven't seen GA in quite some t
59 MCOflyer : Try cleaning out the cab and maybe you will go cross country. Hunter
60 Go3Team : I'm protesting. I'm also not one for cross country stuff. Farthest I go is Texas.
61 MCOflyer : What is the furthest south you go? Hunter
62 Go3Team : I've been to Lakeland, FL a few times.
63 RobK : For a wagon like that, I'd say an average of 5 days per "stint". A lot of UK only drivers do what's known as tramping work, where you set off on a Su
64 MCOflyer : RobK, I can only imagine at what living in one of those for 3 weeks w/o standing headroom might be. Here the we have plenty of trucks over 40ft. Try d
65 Flighty : What we really need here is TATRA czech trucks. YES!!! Now those things are beasts. A TATRA 6WD dump truck can just ram through a whole Siberian fores
66 BHMBAGLOCK : Isuzu does quite well here but doesn't sell any larger trucks, pretty much just mid-sized straight trucks. In fact, they're building a plant now in B
67 MCOflyer : In addition to that, many haul boats to/from Florida for this reason. No escorts can mean the difference in deciding whether to do a job or not. Hunt
68 Post contains images ModernArt : I've posted these book suggestions in previous threads about long-haul trucks. A thousand miles from nowhere : trucking two continents / Graham Coster
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