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LA Next Tallest Building?  
User currently offline747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3403 posts, RR: 2
Posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 2488 times:

I remember when Los Angeles tallest building, the US Bank Tower was built. It was own by the same company that own the Aon Center back then (Interstate Bank). The Aon Center was the building that the US Bank Tower surpass as Los Angeles Tallest building back in 1989. I think it is time to have a larger building in Los Angeles. I know there is a concern about earthquakes, but by now we should be able to build a building that can stand 1100 feet tall and can withstand an earthquake. I know it take money and a purpose for such a building, but I just asking how far away is Los Angeles from having a build that can compete with New York and Chicago buildings?

29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSeb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11465 posts, RR: 15
Reply 1, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 2471 times:

I think it also has to do with economics. Are there enough companies to lease floor space to that can make a building like that profitiable? I think that is the main reason why there are no buildings taller than US Bank Tower and Wells Fargo Center in Portland (both are 42 floors). There is no economical reason to build tall buildings in Portland. Likewise, what is the economy of Los Angeles (or any city) that can support such a building?


Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlineAA61Hvy From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 13977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 2, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 2469 times:

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
I remember when Los Angeles tallest building, the US Bank Tower was built. It was own by the same company that own the Aon Center back then (Interstate Bank). The Aon Center was the building that the US Bank Tower surpass as Los Angeles Tallest building back in 1989. I think it is time to have a larger building in Los Angeles. I know there is a concern about earthquakes, but by now we should be able to build a building that can stand 1100 feet tall and can withstand an earthquake. I know it take money and a purpose for such a building, but I just asking how far away is Los Angeles from having a build that can compete with New York and Chicago buildings?

Where would you suggest a building be placed?



Go big or go home
User currently offline747400sp From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3403 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 2442 times:

Quoting AA61Hvy (Reply 2):
Where would you suggest a building be placed?

Near Union Station.


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26338 posts, RR: 76
Reply 4, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2402 times:

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
I remember when Los Angeles tallest building, the US Bank Tower was built.

It wasn't the US Bank Tower then. It was the First Interstate World Tower, then it was the Library Tower (which most people still call it).

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
It was own by the same company that own the Aon Center back then (Interstate Bank).

First Interstate Bank

Quoting Seb146 (Reply 1):
Are there enough companies to lease floor space to that can make a building like that profitiable?

There are certainly enough and you can flesh out the offices with lawyers

Quoting Seb146 (Reply 1):
Likewise, what is the economy of Los Angeles (or any city) that can support such a building?

Los Angeles is the richest city in the richest state, an absolute economic engine.

Quoting AA61Hvy (Reply 2):

Where would you suggest a building be placed?

Century City has some open space still



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineFlagshipAZ From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 3419 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2395 times:

Since no one has mentioned it, I will. The Library Tower (native Angeleno typing here) has 73 floors. I've been in this building a few times. The elevators in the place go up & down so fast they make your ears pop if you're not prepared for the ride. Speaking just for myself, L.A. doesn't really need another high-rise complex. Seems to me there's a glut of office space as it is. Case in point, the old Ambassador Hotel property on Wilshire Blvd was bought & sold many times, most notably by Donald Trump, who then promised he would build the tallest building in the US there. So what happened? Nothing. Too many spaces, not enough tenants to go around.
Regards.



"Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." --Ben Franklin
User currently offlineGunsontheroof From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 3499 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 2373 times:

Am I the only person who thinks this post looks a lot like something off of an enthusiast site--say, skyscrapers.net?


Next Flight: 9/17 BFI-BFI
User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 2364 times:

Rumble, Rumble.

Crumble, Crumble.

Voilà ... Instant rubble.


User currently offlineJohnboy From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 2573 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2318 times:

Look up north.

http://www.skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=1113


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26338 posts, RR: 76
Reply 9, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2316 times:

Quoting AsstChiefMark (Reply 7):
Rumble, Rumble.

Crumble, Crumble.

Voilà ... Instant rubble.

Doesn't work that way. The L.A. skyscrapers have withstood several major earthquakes. The Twin Towers in Century City are built to withstand about 8.5 on the Richter scale with no damage at all.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7758 posts, RR: 16
Reply 10, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 2311 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 9):
Doesn't work that way. The L.A. skyscrapers have withstood several major earthquakes. The Twin Towers in Century City are built to withstand about 8.5 on the Richter scale with no damage at all.

Though it comes up rather poorly on its ability to handle alien attack...



Given the more sprawled out nature of the LA Basin I find it somewhat difficult to see a nice densely packed CBD with tall skyscrapers... a least not much more than already exists.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineAA61Hvy From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 13977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 11, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 2304 times:

Quoting DesertJets (Reply 10):
Though it comes up rather poorly on its ability to handle alien attack...

My work territory is downtown LA-all the skyscrapers... I always think if Independence Day did occur (the movie) then shit, my numbers for work will go down the toilet  Wink



Go big or go home
User currently offlineZkpilot From New Zealand, joined Mar 2006, 4798 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 2292 times:

Quoting 747400sp (Thread starter):
I remember when Los Angeles tallest building, the US Bank Tower was built. It was own by the same company that own the Aon Center back then (Interstate Bank). The Aon Center was the building that the US Bank Tower surpass as Los Angeles Tallest building back in 1989. I think it is time to have a larger building in Los Angeles. I know there is a concern about earthquakes, but by now we should be able to build a building that can stand 1100 feet tall and can withstand an earthquake. I know it take money and a purpose for such a building, but I just asking how far away is Los Angeles from having a build that can compete with New York and Chicago buildings?

Well Downtown LA has been having a revival as such over the past year... the efforts to tidy up the streets and better crime prevention projects downtown of the past decade are paying off... people now walk the streets outside of business hours... Ralphs just opened a big deli supermarket and is considering a 2nd store... rental prices have been increasing as have apartment values.

Quoting Seb146 (Reply 1):
I think it also has to do with economics. Are there enough companies to lease floor space to that can make a building like that profitiable? I think that is the main reason why there are no buildings taller than US Bank Tower and Wells Fargo Center in Portland (both are 42 floors). There is no economical reason to build tall buildings in Portland. Likewise, what is the economy of Los Angeles (or any city) that can support such a building?

California is the 4th largest economy in the world and Los Angeles is its largest city... there are very few cities around the world that have the population of LA (plus the surrounding population) that have such a small CBD. My own city of Auckland, New Zealand (Auckland only has 1.2million people) has more skyscrapers than downtown LA! Let alone the fact that there are many large corporates in California.

Quoting DesertJets (Reply 10):
Given the more sprawled out nature of the LA Basin I find it somewhat difficult to see a nice densely packed CBD with tall skyscrapers... a least not much more than already exists.

There are plenty of sites downtown for more sky scrapers. Freeway and other road links are good into the city and the congestion is not particularly bad by world standards (its actually quite good around downtown). Public transport has been improving... there is the Red/purple, blue metro subway lines that run right into downtown LA as well as the Gold line running into Grand Central Station (that links with the Red line). Theres no reason why LA couldn't support more skyscrapers.



56 types. 38 countries. 24 airlines.
User currently offlineVSLover From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 1897 posts, RR: 23
Reply 13, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

ACTUALLY there is some plans in motion to start this new development on grand ave across form the concert hall (where the ugly parking structure is, and has been closed down this week).

same people who built the time warner center in nyc and evidently an 80-story or so tower.

http://www.grandavenuela.com/


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26338 posts, RR: 76
Reply 14, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 12):
rental prices have been increasing

Which is NOT a good thing.

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 12):
there are very few cities around the world that have the population of LA (plus the surrounding population) that have such a small CBD.

Actually, L.A. has a much larger skyline that one thinks. 553 skyscrapers within the city limits and that number is growing.

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 12):
Grand Central Station

Union Station. Grand Central is in New York



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineDc9northwest From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 2261 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 14):
553 skyscrapers within the city limits and that number is growing.

What is considered to be a skyscraper for this to be true? (minimum height limit)


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26338 posts, RR: 76
Reply 16, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting Dc9northwest (Reply 15):

What is considered to be a skyscraper for this to be true? (minimum height limit)

No idea, though I see Skyscraper Page listing 262 structures.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9699 posts, RR: 27
Reply 17, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2289 times:
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Quoting N1120A (Reply 14):
Actually, L.A. has a much larger skyline that one thinks. 553 skyscrapers within the city limits and that number is growing.

But those skyscrapers are not clustered around one central business district.

Downtown, Century City, Westwood, Miracle Mile, Warner Center, etc, etc, etc....

"Downtown" as CBD's are typically called, is pretty small in LA. Not really much, if any, bigger than Boston's downtown, and Boston has 1/8 the population.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 9):

Doesn't work that way. The L.A. skyscrapers have withstood several major earthquakes. The Twin Towers in Century City are built to withstand about 8.5 on the Richter scale with no damage at all.

Believe they're all required to withstand an 8.0 by law.

Quoting FlagshipAZ (Reply 5):
The elevators in the place go up & down so fast they make your ears pop if you're not prepared for the ride.

I was in Chicago last week, and we went up to the lounge at the top of the John Hancock Buliding there. It's over 1,000 feet up in the elevators to the 96th floor, and it took probably 30 seconds. 2,000 fpm......quite comparable to taking off in an airplane  Smile



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26338 posts, RR: 76
Reply 18, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 17):

"Downtown" as CBD's are typically called, is pretty small in LA. Not really much, if any, bigger than Boston's downtown, and Boston has 1/8 the population.

But I think you made the point there. We don't have one specific CBD, rather a whole bunch of them.

Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 17):

Believe they're all required to withstand an 8.0 by law.

And considering the Library Tower is actually a relatively new building, I don't think tall buildings are an issue.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineSeb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11465 posts, RR: 15
Reply 19, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 12):
California is the 4th largest economy in the world and Los Angeles is its largest city... there are very few cities around the world that have the population of LA (plus the surrounding population) that have such a small CBD. My own city of Auckland, New Zealand (Auckland only has 1.2million people) has more skyscrapers than downtown LA! Let alone the fact that there are many large corporates in California.

That was why I commented about economics: I worked at Verizon Wireless in Bellvue (east of SEA). Why would a company need that much floor space when they can hire people in China or India for less? I don't think it would be economically feasable for a company to build an office tower in the United States when they could spend that money on their yachts and hire people overseas for less.

Just because the CEOs live in LA does not mean the skyscrapers need to be there. Nike is in Beaverton (suburb of PDX) but the tallest building in PDX is US Bank Building at 42 floors....



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26338 posts, RR: 76
Reply 20, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting Seb146 (Reply 19):
I don't think it would be economically feasable for a company to build an office tower in the United States when they could spend that money on their yachts and hire people overseas for less.

They haven't figured out a way to outsource lawyers, marketing, etc.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineDeltaGator From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 6341 posts, RR: 13
Reply 21, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting DesertJets (Reply 10):
Given the more sprawled out nature of the LA Basin I find it somewhat difficult to see a nice densely packed CBD with tall skyscrapers... a least not much more than already exists.

The same thing we have here in ATL. Downtown, Midtown, Buckhead, Perimeter, Cumberland, Alpharetta, and a few others are major business areas with large/tall buildings.

Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 17):
But those skyscrapers are not clustered around one central business district.

Downtown, Century City, Westwood, Miracle Mile, Warner Center, etc, etc, etc....

"Downtown" as CBD's are typically called, is pretty small in LA. Not really much, if any, bigger than Boston's downtown, and Boston has 1/8 the population.

Same as ATL like I said above. If you could move all those buildings from the various areas into one area/CBD it would be quite big and comparable to other cities with more of a single CBD ala Chicago, Boston, etc.

With the resurgence of downtown LA I wouldn't be surprised to see some decent sized building go up in the next few years versus the last 10-20 years where it would have ended up in Century City, Burbank, etc. The same thing is going on in ATL though folks are still building big ass towers in all the other areas I listed.



"If you can't delight in the misery of others then you don't deserve to be a college football fan."
User currently offlineUH60FtRucker From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting DeltaGator (Reply 21):

With the resurgence of downtown LA I wouldn't be surprised to see some decent sized building go up in the next few years versus the last 10-20 years where it would have ended up in Century City, Burbank, etc. The same thing is going on in ATL though folks are still building big ass towers in all the other areas I listed.

And the spread out nature of both LA and Atlanta work against either cities needing very tall buildings.

When you look at New York, Boston, Chicago... the fact that space is at such a premium encourages tall buildings. Chicago is going to have the new Trump tower, which will be the 2nd tallest building in the city. And it's visually stunning when viewed from the river.


Chicago is also going to have the Chicago Spire (which I personally don't like... it looks like a giant dildo).


Boston added the State Street Financial Center back in 2003. There is also the on-again/off-again proposal for the Winthrop Square building (1,000ft)


And New York, of course, will be getting the Freedom Tower and the other 5 world trade center buildings. And Seattle lifted a lot of the old rules limiting size of downtown buildings. There should be some interesting development there in the coming decade.

I just don't see many large buildings being built in the downtown area of LA.

-UH60


User currently offlineRJdxer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 9):
The Twin Towers in Century City are built to withstand about 8.5 on the Richter scale with no damage at all.

Can you say "Titanic"?


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26338 posts, RR: 76
Reply 24, posted (6 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2289 times:

Quoting RJdxer (Reply 23):

Can you say "Titanic"?

Well, we expect earthquakes, they didn't expect the ice berg. Also, those towers have already withstood several major earthquakes that have done major damage to other structures.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
25 Johnboy : I have mixed feelings about this one.....it's so different that it might just grow on me.
26 Post contains images MSYtristar : Trump Tower New Orleans (which will FINALLY start construction in Jan/Feb '08) will be 842' tall....the tallest between Houston and Atlanta. Sorry, ha
27 Post contains links 102IAHexpress : Back in July billionaire realtor Zaya Younan proposed building the world’s tallest tower. He narrowed the site locations to Chicago, Los Angels or H
28 Cfalk : I think they can do it, but I would not want to be on the 100th floor of such a building when a big one hits. Put simply, the way to secure a large b
29 Seb146 : Unfortunately, no. But, if the pay is good, the lawyers and marketing will work in the suburbs or someplace like Fresno where rents for the company a
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