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MMR  
User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 679 times:

There is a lot of controversy over here about the MMR vacine. This is the measle, Mump, and rubella jab for children. There are fears that it leads to ortism in children. I can imagine many things going wrong when you mix 3 living virus'. I think it would be far safer, and more responsible of the government to vaccine each desease seperately.
There is also rumour going around that Tony Blairs son did not have the combined vaccine, but had them seperately. Interesting isn't it?
Iain

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13166 posts, RR: 78
Reply 1, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 649 times:

Bloody media hype more like it, ah the pleasures of power without responsiblity.
The rest of the developed world uses MMR with no apparent problems.
No evidence of a link to Autism, from 90 nations worldwide.
Much more dangerous is the risks of the diseases they are supposed to prevent.
Now an outbreak in 'Nappy Valley' in Clapham, an area known for low take up of the jab.
Japan adopted a separate vaccine in the 1990's, during this period a number of children died, none did in Britain.
Whenever you take any vaccine, or medicene, there is the risk of some reaction.
We all have to trust qualified medical people from time to time, not the bloody Daily Mail or Sun.
As for Blair's son, who's business is it? In very few cases a triple vaccine is needed for children with certain medical conditions. If this was the case with Leo Blair, what an invasion of his privacy.
Anyway, people say they don't listen to politicans, so why take an interest in the PM's son?
And this is medical opinion not a political message.
There was an unfounded scare with the whooping cough jab 30 years ago, so less take up, and some children died of whooping cough.



User currently offlineRedngold From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 6907 posts, RR: 45
Reply 2, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 629 times:

My sister and I both had really bad reactions to the MMR when we were 5 and 6 years old, respectively (we got the shots during the same visit.) The next day, we both woke up with paralyzed legs (the leg in which the shot was given.) My sister was much worse off than I, because she was also completely numb in the leg. I could at least feel my leg, even though I couldn't move it. So I was able to drag myself around relatively effectively, and I was back to walking normally the next day. It took my sister several days until she was back to normal.

Almost the same thing happened to me when I got another MMR when I was 16 years old. My arm wasn't paralyzed this time, but it was extremely stiff and painful.

Most people don't get that kind of reaction to an MMR. People ask me if I am not confusing the reaction to a tetanus shot. No, I am sure it was an MMR because I have read my own medical records.

redngold



Up, up and away!
User currently offlineAirplanetire From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1809 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 626 times:

When I got an MMR shot a few years ago, nothing happened at all to me. I just did a study with a new tetanus shot. I needed one anyway, so I figured I can get paid, or not get paid. It was a tetanus/diptheria/pertusis(whooping cough) instead of just the normal tetanus/diptheria. All that happened was I felt really tired and out of energy for a day and my arm was really soar for a few days.

User currently offlineN400QX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 623 times:

I don't really have a problem with MMR or any vaccination... their positives outweigh their negatives.

Anyway, when I got my MMR, my only post-injection smyptom was temporary loss of conciousness (for a few minutes) about 15 minutes after the injection, which was a bit startling, but not harmful. At least I wasn't old enough to drive back then...


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 5, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 614 times:

GDB summed it up pretty well. As he says we've now got outbreaks of measles all over the country because the take up of the injections has fallen so far. What concerns me most is the pattern these days of a panic reaction every time the phrase "no evidence of a link" in this case to autism, is used. There seems to be a belief that that means there is a link, it just hasn't been found yet. People need to understand that proving safety is impossible, it has to be approached from the other direction.

Grossly irresponsible media.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
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MMR posted Mon Feb 4 2002 00:27:49 by Iainhol