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Is There A Typical Scandinavian Dish?  
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6596 posts, RR: 35
Posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3353 times:
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Everytime I asked for one, all I got was cream, cold fish and potatoes. Is there anyting different?

38 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDoona From Sweden, joined Feb 2005, 3772 posts, RR: 13
Reply 1, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3349 times:

I don't know if there is a typical dish for Scandinavia. However, there are typical Swedish, Danish and Norwegian dishes.

Cheers
Mats



Sure, we're concerned for our lives. Just not as concerned as saving 9 bucks on a roundtrip to Ft. Myers.
User currently offlineLAXspotter From India, joined Jan 2007, 3650 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3348 times:



Quoting AR385 (Thread starter):
Everytime I asked for one, all I got was cream, cold fish and potatoes. Is there anyting different?

Thankyou Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_of_Sweden
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_cuisine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_of_Norway
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_of_Denmark

Great place to learn about food you're dying to taste  drool 



"Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel" Samuel Johnson
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6596 posts, RR: 35
Reply 3, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3346 times:
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Quoting Doona (Reply 1):
I don't know if there is a typical dish for Scandinavia. However, there are typical Swedish, Danish and Norwegian dishes.

Ok, I sincerely apologize for my ignorance in grouping those three marvelous countries in one. Any typical Swedish dish? Danish and or Norweigan, not involving cream, potatoes and fish.


User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6596 posts, RR: 35
Reply 4, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3343 times:
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Quoting LAXspotter (Reply 2):
Great place to learn about food you're dying to taste

The thing is, I'm not particularly dying to taste it. I have already. I just wanted to know if there was something different


User currently offlineLAXspotter From India, joined Jan 2007, 3650 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3341 times:



Quoting AR385 (Reply 4):
I'm not particularly dying to taste it

you hate it huh  Smile IMO ofcourse there is variety. Obviously certain groups have staples. Asian Countries: Rice, Ireland:Potato, USA: Beef but there is variety for sure.



"Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel" Samuel Johnson
User currently offlineDoona From Sweden, joined Feb 2005, 3772 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3341 times:



Quoting AR385 (Reply 3):
Any typical Swedish dish? Danish and or Norweigan, not involving cream, potatoes and fish.

You could probably substitute the fish for some pork. Other than that, not really  rotfl 

Cheers
Mats



Sure, we're concerned for our lives. Just not as concerned as saving 9 bucks on a roundtrip to Ft. Myers.
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6596 posts, RR: 35
Reply 7, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3339 times:
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Quoting Doona (Reply 6):
You could probably substitute the fish for some pork. Other than that, not really

Thought so. That's why I lost so many pounds while in Scandinavia


User currently offlineNeilYYZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3330 times:

There's a TV commercial on here in Canada recently that's for Citi Bank I think and it shows a dish from Norway that induces a gag reflex every time I see it. There's a fish head, some strange colored sausages and what looks to be a pile of something unknown to man.

User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6596 posts, RR: 35
Reply 9, posted (7 years 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 3328 times:
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Quoting NeilYYZ (Reply 8):

IT does sound familiar to what I got everywhere


User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6596 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (7 years 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3251 times:
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Come on, any kind of roasted game? OR, is it true school chilfren are given frozen fish popsicles? And they like them?
 Confused


User currently offlineJ_Hallgren From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1507 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3228 times:

A couple that my Mom used to make were pea soup followed by pancakes (thin), and cabbage rolls...and also sausages and rotmous (spelling???) (a mix of rutabaga and potato)..


COBOL - Not a dead language yet!
User currently offlineDoona From Sweden, joined Feb 2005, 3772 posts, RR: 13
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3197 times:



Quoting AR385 (Reply 10):
Come on, any kind of roasted game? OR, is it true school chilfren are given frozen fish popsicles? And they like them?

If you're referring to fish sticks, then yeah, but they're not actually frozen when served, nor popsicles.

Cheers
Mats



Sure, we're concerned for our lives. Just not as concerned as saving 9 bucks on a roundtrip to Ft. Myers.
User currently offlineGunsontheroof From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 3509 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3193 times:



Quoting LAXspotter (Reply 2):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_cuisine

Don't bother looking there--in my experience, it's bread, butter and three deserts with coffee a day.  Wink



Next Flight: 9/17 BFI-BFI
User currently offlineBofredrik From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3190 times:

1. Blodpudding
Pigs blod + something else...
http://kontrakt.blogg.se/images/blodpudding_1160050705.jpg

2. Kottbullar
http://www.recepten.se/images/recept/2/239/koettbullar_2.jpg

3. Sill
http://www.butik-hemlangtan.m.se/varor/SillTreSorter.jpg

4. Falukorv
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...54/Falukorv.jpg/220px-Falukorv.jpg

5. Ärtsoppa
http://www.coop.se/upload/opskrifter/158881.jpg

and to all this most of us drink:
http://www.tinyurl.se/8c8





 Smile


User currently offlineTIA From Albania, joined Mar 2006, 524 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 3158 times:

Last time I was in Norway I had reindeer and according to my Norwegian friend that was an authentic dish.

User currently offlineJAGflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3582 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3128 times:

I am surprised no one has said this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk



Support the beer and soda can industry, recycle old airplanes!
User currently offlineDeskflier From Sweden, joined Jan 2007, 537 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3127 times:

One Swedish speciality is what is known as a Half-Special: A hot dog in a bread with a dab of mashed potatoes on top. To this you usually drink a chocolate and milk drink with the brand name "Pucko" ("Knucklehead").

In Norway you would be lucky to find any dish that does not include some kind of codfish.



How can anyone not fly, when we live at a time when we can fly?
User currently offlineLHboyatDTW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3079 times:



Quoting JAGflyer (Reply 16):

oh heaven forbid no  Wow!

Being Swedish I have to suffer the torment of eating it over the holidays, let alone endure the week long stench that comes with it during prepping.  vomit 


User currently offlineJamincan From Canada, joined Aug 2006, 776 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 3057 times:

Swedish Meatballs? Potatoes, cream, and beef.

User currently offlineRayChuang From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 8034 posts, RR: 5
Reply 20, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3032 times:

If you read the Wikipedia article, the problem with lutefisk is when you use cod to make it, the odor leaves much to be desired. Make it from haddock or pollock and you avoid that pungent smell.  Smile

User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 4089 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (7 years 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3026 times:

Lutefisk ( Scandinavian fish dish )


Considered to be Norway's WMD ( Weapons of MAss Destruction )  Smile

Some comments about the dish from various European and American food journalists:



"Lutefisk is not food, it is a weapon of mass destruction. It is currently the only exception for the man who ate everything. Otherwise, I am fairly liberal, I gladly eat worms and insects, but I draw the line on lutefisk."

"What is special with lutefisk?"

"Lutefisk is the Norwegians' attempt at conquering the world. When they discovered that Viking raids didn't give world supremacy, they invented a meal so terrifying, so cruel, that they could scare people to become one's subordinates. And if I'm not terribly wrong, you will be able to do it as well."



Read more here Smile

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk


User currently offlineAgill From Sweden, joined Feb 2004, 1012 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2992 times:

Lutfisk isn't that bad, even I eat that and I usually don't even like fish. Surströmming, now thats a completely different ballgame.

[Edited 2007-11-25 01:58:37]

User currently offlineDeskflier From Sweden, joined Jan 2007, 537 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (7 years 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2956 times:

And, of course, the vegetable that in both Spanish and English took its name from the Nation Glory and Heroes: The Swede, or rutabaga. Mashed swedes and a salty hand of pork, they're the best you can eat. And to drink, a dark beer.


How can anyone not fly, when we live at a time when we can fly?
User currently offlineVonRichtofen From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 4638 posts, RR: 36
Reply 24, posted (7 years 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2955 times:

When I was in Denmark hanging with a local the diet was mostly Pizza and Burger King.


Word
25 Post contains images Scooter01 : " target=_blank>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk Another reason to celebrate St.Patric's Day! Scooter01
26 Post contains links and images Andaman : Ok, speaking about Nordic-Finnish kitchen: Despite the popular pizza & kebab culture the typical Finnish kitchen is still alive and kicking: all kinds
27 Post contains images KaiGywer : Who can forget this one??? Norway's national dish
28 Post contains images Andaman : Is Grandiosa a Norwegian brand? So Norway imports oil and frozen pizzas to Finland
29 Nuori5084 : Some good stuff you listed there. I bet you didn't know there are 93 McDonald's restaurants in Finland? Some of my family favorites are "Finnish" pan
30 Post contains images Andaman : I try to avoid fast food but I rather go to the if I have to Rovaniemi town in Lapland has the world's most northern McDonald's, though no McRudolph
31 DL021 : Reindeer and aquavit
32 Nuori5084 : True. Good stuff. I will have to pay a visit to that place next time.
33 N1120A : The problem with lutefisk, other than the fact that it is treated with poison and smells terrible, is that you end up reducing the protein content of
34 Post contains images JCS17 : Reindeer... in tube form. Reindeer dishes and salmon are pretty good, but other than that Scandinavian foods really never struck me as remotely tasty
35 Post contains links and images RJdxer : According to this site, no. http://scanelite.dk/elite.cfm
36 Doona : Actually Reindeer-flavoured soft cheese. In this country you can get soft cheese in a tube with pretty much any flavour. Disgusting, just disgusting.
37 Post contains links BCAL : Ever been in the restaurant or food hall at Ikea? They claim Swedish specialities are meatballs, open sandwiches, pickled salmon and Dime Cake.
38 Doona : I wouldn't say that it's a claim, we do eat alot of those things. Cheers Mats
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