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England Vs United Kingdom  
User currently offlineManuCH From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 3012 posts, RR: 46
Posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1831 times:
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Sometimes in threads here and there comments pop up about the fact that England "isn't a country", and some people seem to be genuinely offended if someone else says "in England this and that happened":

Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 10):
Quoting Jush (Reply 9):
You just cannot hire & fire here in Germany like you do that in England or the US.

ERROR: No country with the name 'England' found....

Now, I know Wikipedia isn't always correct, but for sake of simplicity I'm going to quote them anyway:

Quote:
England (...) is the largest and most populous constituent country[1][2] of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

They call England a "constituent country". So, is it actually wrong to talk about England like Jush did in his post in this thread?
German Boss Fires Staff For Not Smoking (by Helvknight Jan 10 2008 in Non Aviation)

He didn't say "(...) like you do that in the sovereign country of England", he referred to England as a place, like you would by saying "in London" or "in Brooklyn" (which is a borough, not a city, but can still be mentioned).

Can this be considered offensive or somehow incorrect? Please enlighten me.


Never trust a statistic you didn't fake yourself
72 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLHRjc From Netherlands, joined Apr 2006, 1964 posts, RR: 19
Reply 1, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1791 times:



Quoting ManuCH (Thread starter):
Can this be considered offensive or somehow incorrect? Please enlighten me.

To be honest, I don't get offended whatsoever. I am English, I was born and live in England. But I am also British, and was born and live in Britain. Both are correct. I don't get offended if anyone calls me English instead of British, or vice versa, and depending on where I am and what situation I'm in, I would use either England or Britain. Now if I were to mistake me for being Scottish... well that would be another story  biggrin 

I know a lot of Scottish people, and one of them in particular who shall remain nameless Nighthawk has to correct me quite often for saying something is English when I mean British, so I'm as guilty as people who aren't from England.. Or Britain.. or wherever.



"Our 319's are very reliable. They get fixed very quickly."
User currently offlineSwiftski From Australia, joined Dec 2006, 2701 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1792 times:

Whilst not the same, for us it's I guess comparable to being called "American (USA)" and "North American" and people classing the two as interchangeable. Sometimes they are (i.e. if you are from USA you are from North America) - other times they are not (i.e. the drinking age is 21 in "North America" is not true)

User currently offlineA320ajm From United Kingdom, joined May 2006, 547 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1787 times:

If someone said England is not a country it would annoy me. I was born in England and i am English and no matter what anyone else says i live in a country called England. Yes, i am also British but i am English aswell.
Regards
A320ajm



If the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'
User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5178 posts, RR: 33
Reply 4, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1776 times:

Quoting ManuCH (Thread starter):
You just cannot hire & fire here in Germany like you do that in England or the US.

In this particular context the poster was referring to England as if it was its own unique entity, when in fact it is part of a larger entity, ie the UK, which should have been used in this case.

Its like saying "You just cannot hire & fire here in Germany like you do in london".

The sentence suggests that london is unique in its laws and that the rest of the UK has different laws, when infact the law is the same across the whole country.Britian/UK would have been the correct term. (although law is a bad example as there are differences between england/scotland)

Anyway, the reason such posts really irk me is that we are constantly told that Scotland is not a country, its part of the UK and we should be proud of that. yet everyone always refers to "england" rather than UK, completely ignoring the fact that we exist. IMHO either Scotland should be independent, or everyone should refer to us as the UK/britain.

Incidentally I nearly threw the remote through the TV last night, I was watching an american film, and some girl was choosing a holiday destination.... under the list of destinations in europe was Italy... France... Spain... England. England??? Wheres Scotland?? Do we no longer exist? Shouldnt it be Britain???

Anyway, hope you see where im coming from

[Edited 2008-01-10 14:00:50]


That'll teach you
User currently offlineBCAL From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 3384 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1764 times:

I think the best description can be found in Encarta

Quote:
England (in Latin, Anglia), country and constituent part of the island of Great Britain, comprising, with the principality of Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

It is a country and constituent part of GB. It has its own flag, you have English Courts and legal system but the law is the law of England and Wales, and if this is your country of domicile they say you are domiciled in England and Wales. However, you are UK resident and have an UK passport. I think foreigners regard us as the British (except the French who call us the Rostbifs!) but English is more appropriate for those of us in GB who were not born/live in Wales or Northern Ireland and, of course, there is British Airways.

No doubt England's a.net ambassador Banco will enlighten us if/when he reads the thread.



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User currently offlineAlexEU From Serbia, joined Oct 2007, 1823 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1746 times:

Well, it is also ''more'' correct to say UK instead of Britain, because UK includes N.Ireland which is also incorporate part of UK Great Britain and N.Ireland.

I think it's more language problem. Arizona is a state, it is not a country (that we are aware of), but we also call Israel a state (but Israel is a country).
England is definetly not independent sovereign country, it is more like a subdivision of a country with higher autonomy. Similar status to US states.


User currently offlineGkirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24961 posts, RR: 56
Reply 7, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1743 times:

England is a country.
As is Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales (we'll give them the benefit of the doubt - poor sods!  duck  )



When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21496 posts, RR: 53
Reply 8, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1733 times:



Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 4):
Incidentally I nearly threw the remote through the TV last night, I was watching an american film, and some girl was choosing a holiday destination.... under the list of destinations in europe was Italy... France... Spain... England. England??? Wheres Scotland?? Do we no longer exist? Shouldnt it be Britain???

Well, the colloquial name of your nationality is simply England.

I'm aware of the historical inaccuracy and the various resentments touched by that name, but that is simply the name people all over the world use in practice. Of course "United Kingdom" or "Great Britain" is the politically correct, precise and formal name, but few people use that one in real life.

It is a similar difference as between "Germany" and "Federal Republic of Germany" - one is the colloquial name of our nationality, the other the formal name of our nation state. And during the separation after WWII most people in the west often referred to only the western part as "Germany", even though that was formally incorrect. People just are like that.

It wouldn't have been entirely inconceivable that history could have ended up with our nationality being "Prussia" (or "Saupreißn" as bavarians would call any german from outside their own region state ) and people all over the world would call every german "prussian", even though the bavarians would be seething with resentment at that just like you're doing now...!  mischievous 

Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 4):
Anyway, hope you see where im coming from

How so? You seem to have crossed out what would have been your flag normally...!  stirthepot 


User currently offlineJamesbaldwyn From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1724 times:

I'd only be offended if I was to be called Welsh Big grin

User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26718 posts, RR: 75
Reply 10, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1708 times:



Quoting LHRjc (Reply 1):
But I am also British, and was born and live in Britain.

Technically, you live ON Britain.

Quoting AlexEU (Reply 6):
England is definetly not independent sovereign country, it is more like a subdivision of a country with higher autonomy. Similar status to US states.

Actually, not really. England has little, if any autonomy, while US states have a great deal.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 8):

Well, the colloquial name of your nationality is simply England.

Not at all. The colloquial used for his nationality is Scottish



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User currently offlineAlexEU From Serbia, joined Oct 2007, 1823 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1698 times:



Quoting N1120A (Reply 10):
Actually, not really. England has little, if any autonomy, while US states have a great deal.

That's right, I forgot to say that. But not in int'l way. They are int'l just a country subdivision.


User currently offlineGlom From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 2821 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1697 times:



Quoting ManuCH (Thread starter):
They call England a "constituent country". So, is it actually wrong to talk about England like Jush did in his post in this thread?

Yes it is. Employment legislation is a reserved matter and so is determined on a UK basis, therefore he should have referred to the UK, not England, which is just one of four home nations of the UK.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 8):
Well, the colloquial name of your nationality is simply England.

Well please shake the habit now or we start calling you Prussia. It's bad for unionism. Just look what you've done to Nighthawk. And he doesn't even speak Scots Gaelic. The Welsh and the Scots and the Northern Irish aren't English because they are obviously Welsh/Scots/Northern Irish (delete as appropriate). So when Johnny foreigner keeps conflating English and British, it makes the Welsh/Scots/Northern Irish (well maybe not quite the last but that's complicated) think also think the same.

That is another reason why the England team should sing Land of Hope and Glory (nice song as well) at the games. The Scots team sings Flower of Scotland, the Welsh sing Land of my Fathers (in Welsh mostly). Yet the English sing God Save the Queen. But God Save the Queen is the British anthem. So Scots and Welsh end up regarding their own anthem the same as the England team (ie with scorn). That's bad for the United Kingdom.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 8):
It is a similar difference as between "Germany" and "Federal Republic of Germany"

That's a bad example. In the colloquial name, you still get the ultimate point across. But by colloquially calling the UK England, you omit the Scots and the Welsh and the Northern Irish.

A better comparison would be "Britain" and "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".


User currently offlineGlom From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 2821 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1695 times:



Quoting N1120A (Reply 10):
Actually, not really. England has little, if any autonomy, while US states have a great deal.

England is under the direct rule of the central government. Not normally a problem when all of Great Britain was, but since devolution to Scotland and Wales, it has begun to be regarded as anomalous that there is no autonomy for England like Scotland and Wales.


User currently offlineAntdenatale From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2006, 178 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1682 times:
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Quoting Jamesbaldwyn (Reply 9):
I'd only be offended if I was to be called Welsh Big grin

Well to be honest, I would rather be called Welsh than English any day of the week, at least us Welsh, our friends in Scotland and Ireland are not all a bunch of arrogant b***ards who think the world ends somewhere north of Newcastle and west of Bristol!!!  Big grin  Big grin  Big grin  Big grin  Big grin  Big grin  Big grin  Big grin


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 1655 times:



Quoting Glom (Reply 12):
Yes it is. Employment legislation is a reserved matter and so is determined on a UK basis, therefore he should have referred to the UK, not England, which is just one of four home nations of the UK.

Actually, given that Scotland has an entirely separate legal system to England and Wales, it's not unreasonable at all to talk about England rather than the UK.

On the issue of using England interchangeably with Britain, the irony is that Scots themselves used England as a synonym for Britain endlessly until really part way through the last century. That's actually because the English were the ones to subsume their identity within Britain, whilst the Scots and Welsh didn't. So England was endlessly used in place of Britain or the UK.

Only in the last generation or so has there been real sensitivity to the usage. And by the way, lots of Scots get irritated by being termed "Scotch", but that too was a perfectly acceptable term until fairly recently.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21496 posts, RR: 53
Reply 16, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 1645 times:



Quoting Glom (Reply 12):
Well please shake the habit now or we start calling you Prussia.

Oh, by all means do that if it manages to amuse you - you would just not find many people who would understand what you were trying to say...!

Quoting Glom (Reply 12):
It's bad for unionism. Just look what you've done to Nighthawk.

I thought all you english people could take a bit of teasing...!  stirthepot 

Quoting Glom (Reply 12):
That's a bad example. In the colloquial name, you still get the ultimate point across. But by colloquially calling the UK England, you omit the Scots and the Welsh and the Northern Irish.

A better comparison would be "Britain" and "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

No. I was talking about the colloquial name. And that one all over the world is simply just "England" for most people (yeah, like "Scotland - that's in England, right?"  mischievous  ). The whole mess of unresolved occupations loaded with resentment and without a proper federal structure just has its downsides there.

I'm very thankful that Germany was actually united and wasn't just occupied and subsumed by one of its regional constituents (like Prussia). As a result there is relatively little internal resentment left - only the bavarians keep grumbling, but it's mostly low-impact folklore at this point.

Quoting Banco (Reply 15):
Actually, given that Scotland has an entirely separate legal system to England and Wales, it's not unreasonable at all to talk about England rather than the UK.

Almost nobody abroad makes that distinction in this way.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 17, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1641 times:



Quoting Klaus (Reply 16):
Almost nobody abroad makes that distinction in this way.

And why should they? They couldn't possibly be expected to know.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 16):
And that one all over the world is simply just "England" for most people (yeah, like "Scotland - that's in England, right?"

Well, to be honest, that's simple ignorance. It's not hidden in any way, and Scotland and England have pretty long histories.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21496 posts, RR: 53
Reply 18, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1629 times:



Quoting Banco (Reply 17):
Well, to be honest, that's simple ignorance. It's not hidden in any way, and Scotland and England have pretty long histories.

Yeah, but the occupation and subsumption of Scotland by England (instead of a unification of both under a shared roof) has certainly made this misunderstanding a lot easier than it might have to be.

Not that anybody living was to be faulted for it - it's just how things have been done in the past. But maybe a proper federalization of Britain can remove the remaining asymmetry and take away some of the still lingering strain.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 19, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 1624 times:



Quoting Klaus (Reply 18):
Yeah, but the occupation and subsumption of Scotland by England

Errrr......you've just shown your ignorance (not a criticism) on the matter . There was no occupation and Scotland was not subsumed. Scotland freely CHOSE to unite with England. The idea that England conquered and absorbed Scotland is utterly laughable.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 18):
But maybe a proper federalization of Britain can remove the remaining asymmetry and take away some of the still lingering strain.

Ah, your pet subject. But clearly someone so clueless about British history is not worth paying the remotest attention to. Sorry.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineManuCH From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 3012 posts, RR: 46
Reply 20, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1595 times:
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Quoting Banco (Reply 19):
Quoting Klaus (Reply 18):
Yeah, but the occupation and subsumption of Scotland by England

Errrr......you've just shown your ignorance (not a criticism) on the matter . There was no occupation and Scotland was not subsumed. Scotland freely CHOSE to unite with England. The idea that England conquered and absorbed Scotland is utterly laughable.

*Grabs some popcorn* ...

Anyway, this turned out to be at least as interesting as I thought  Smile thanks for the various points of view. Probably Klaus got one of the main points: it's only a matter of calling the UK with its colloquial name, which happens to be England for many people, even if it's not formally correct. But I can understand that this irks some of those living there.



Never trust a statistic you didn't fake yourself
User currently offlineJakTrax From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 4936 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1589 times:



Quoting Antdenatale (Reply 14):
world ends somewhere north of Newcastle and west of Bristol!!!

Why, does it not?

 stirthepot 


User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 22, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1586 times:



Quoting ManuCH (Thread starter):
the fact that England "isn't a country",

-
if something is IN England or refers to matters IN England, it is no problem. But you should abstain from using the terms England/English when referring to things north of the Limes and when talking to people north of the Limes or when mentioning Glasgow or Edinburgh or Aberdeen or Inverness.
-
whenever not a problem really, you also should, out of fairness and politeness, use Great Britain / Britain / U.K./ British in regard to Wales and its cities like Cardiff etc .
-


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14131 posts, RR: 62
Reply 23, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1585 times:



Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 4):
ncidentally I nearly threw the remote through the TV last night, I was watching an american film, and some girl was choosing a holiday destination.... under the list of destinations in europe was Italy... France... Spain... England. England??? Wheres Scotland?? Do we no longer exist? Shouldnt it be Britain???

Maybe she MEANT England and decided that Scotland wasn't the place to go for holidays (like swinging London over murky Glasgow).  stirthepot   Wink

Jan


User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 24, posted (6 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1571 times:



Quoting A320ajm (Reply 3):
If someone said England is not a country it would annoy me.

So that you can be permanently annoyed, as international organisations like the U.N., the E.U., ICAO, Red Cross etc do NOT have "England" as a country but either Great Britain or the United Kingdom or in the official was the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland". And you as well might be annoyed about your passport, which most likely has this official name of the country on its top.
-

Quoting AlexEU (Reply 6):
Well, it is also ''more'' correct to say UK instead of Britain, because UK includes N.Ireland which is also incorporate part of UK Great Britain and N.Ireland.

This opens up the question about the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".
> Is it the United Kingdom --- of GB & NI
or > Is it the --- United Kingdom of GB ---- and Northern Ireland
-

Quoting Klaus (Reply 8):
the colloquial name of your nationality is simply England.

you mean just as the colloquial name for Germans in Switzerland is "Schwaabe " ?  Big grin  Big grin
-


Quoting Glom (Reply 12):
Prussia.

As Prussia is now in Poland and Russia, you rather should use the nice name Teutonia ! Cheers
-

Quoting ManuCH (Reply 20):
the UK with its colloquial name, which happens to be England for many people, even if it's not formally correct.

It is not only "not formally correct", it is wrong IF things in Scotland or Wales are talked about
-


25 MD11Engineer : Not really, a big part of former Prussia is today's Berlin and Brandenburg. As a Berliner, I'm a Prussian. Jan
26 Glom : Oh the English can take a bit of teasing. The Scots and the Welsh on the other hand have always been a bit testy. And the Irish totally take things W
27 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : oh sure, no doubt about this ! -
28 Post contains images Klaus : Or "Piefke" in Austria. Unless, of course, you happen to mention Europe or the Euro - at that point they immediately pop a few screws and switch to r
29 Banco : Since you've already ludicrously claimed that the unification was based on an English occupation and then subjugation, "as far as you remember" is no
30 Bwest : Come to think of it... England, Scotland and Wales all have their own national soccer teams, but when the olympics come, there's no English or Scottis
31 Banco : Not really. The British pretty much invented all those team sports and exported them around the world. It's only really the Olympics where we compete
32 Klaus : Subsumed was the word, not subjugated. Not the same thing at all as far as I'm aware. I've never claimed to be an expert on scottish history, so I do
33 Wrighbrothers : Here's my opinion: I was born in England but am half Scottish, half english, therefore you could say I'm english ? No, not in my opinion, I'm British,
34 Banco : And equally wrong. Care to tell us all about this occupation you mentioned? And yet you felt free to pass on the fruits of your lack of knowledge by
35 MD11Engineer : I think why (mostly older) people in Germany refer to whole of Great britain as "England" is that during the 19th and early 20th century the economica
36 Post contains images Banco : Scale plays a pretty bit part. 80% of the UK population are in England. With that overwhelming majority in one constituent country, it's not that sur
37 MD11Engineer : I have a good friend who is living in Tilburg in the province South Brabant in the Netherlands and he goes ballistic if somebody calls the Netherland
38 Banco : I wonder if it's an issue (in English anyway) that there are so many fewer syllables in Holland? Maybe it's easier to say? Though historically, Engli
39 MD11Engineer : I think it is again the same reason as for older Germans calling Britain England: The political and economical center since the 16th century used to
40 Glom : I did actually ask a Dutch guy I worked with about that and he said there was no difference. That much is true. What's the German for United Kingdom?
41 Banco : That's an interesting observation. Historians continually refer to the Spanish Netherlands here, but whether that was the terminology used at the tim
42 Banco : It wasn't "allowed". These matches were the very first internationals in any of these sports! Just a natural thing.
43 MD11Engineer : He is probably from Holland. I have noticed that people from the province Holland often use Holland and Netherlands interchangeably, but people from
44 Post contains links and images Klaus : Oh boy. So much for the fabled british composure. As for the infamous "subsumed" - I had been applying it to a hypothetical alternative german history
45 Klaus : "Vereinigtes Königreich", but it is only very rarely used, mostly as a quote / unquote kind of literal translation. Okay; I didn't claim it did. The
46 Glom : Wow, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom have a lot in common. Except that the Union had lasted for generations by then and so the "British" that
47 Jetblueguy22 : I didn't know that there was a difference between being British or English. It really shows how much they teach us about other countries in America! I
48 Banco : A bit pointless to argue with someone who doesn't know what they're talking about. Nice try with the Highland clearances, but even Wikipedia is caref
49 Klaus : Well, as I've explained above, I never claimed that to have taken place exactly like that - that was Banco's re-interpretation of my very different s
50 Post contains images Banco : Oh, for crying out loud! Your quote was: Stop lying, stop wriggling, and admit you were wrong.
51 Post contains images Klaus : No, I didn't miss that. The english-dominated british government ordering the execution of punitive actions in and against large parts of Scotland, i
52 MD11Engineer : Klaus, give in! There always was a cultural difference between the "civilised" Lowland Scots and the "wild, barbarian, tribalist" Highland Scots. What
53 Post contains images Klaus : I had indeed missed that one when I had made my re-check above. My mistake. I don't always remember correctly which of various post revisions has fin
54 Post contains images Banco : No, you're trying to twist and turn again when shown to be wrong. As stated earlier, the Highland clearances were at the behest of the Lowland Scots,
55 Banco : My last post crossed with this one of yours. Thank you.
56 Post contains images Klaus : And how does that give the affected people any more of a feeling that they had been a valid and equal part of british society and not victims of a br
57 Davehammer : Always a contentious topic. I'm not too fussed as to what people refer to me as. English or British. One problem though. These days we have the West L
58 ME AVN FAN : in Switzerland, the name "Britanniae" is used by many people. The difference is that the "Rest-Netherlands" are NOT a separate political unit. So he
59 Post contains links Baroque : I've said it before and I'll say it again, "The English, the English, the English are best! I wouldn't give tuppence for all of the rest!" "A Song of
60 ME AVN FAN : you mean like "bad English cuisine" and "good British Whisky" ?
61 Post contains images Gkirk : Amazing how much bullshit (for lack of better word) that people who don't even live in any of the countries of the UK are spouting in this thread
62 Baroque : Yep, you have definitely got it - says he starting a war with the Scots over Scotch. Oh my sainted haggis.
63 Post contains images Fiatstilojtd : Great Britain/UK/England Well, regarding history etc, you are correct, but in many other things I wish they would take things much more serious then
64 Post contains images David L : As you and a couple of others have shown many times, that definitely works both ways. While there was a certain amount of blackmail involved, that's
65 Post contains images Klaus : I think I'm quite okay with european integration. No debate about it. Which is usually quite traumatic for the respective population - as in every ot
66 AlexEU : I wouldn't say that Isle of Man (or Channel Islands for that matter) are integral part of UK. They are dependency. But England is definetly integral p
67 Post contains images Banco : Ahh....hmm....well. They're slightly different circumstances for each of them, really. In the case of the Channel Islands, because they were part of
68 AlexEU : Non of them are EU ! Gibraltar is the only dependent country that is part of EU
69 Banco : Sorry? I think you misunderstood me, that had nothing to do with the EU. Let me explain: William I of England was Duke of Normandy before he invaded
70 Post contains images Fiatstilojtd : Or AlexEU to make it easier to understand.....Banco, Cornish, Kirkie, Nighthawk etc. are a "dependency" of Skidmarks...oh wait he has moved from the
71 Post contains images Banco : No, no, no, no, NO!!!! Channel Islands I said! Not those tax dodging primitives in the Irish sea!
72 Wrighbrothers : Hello, sorry about the spelling, too much work and not enough rest ! And yes I know what it says on my passport, but British is my nationality, The U
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