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GPS Theft - I Swear They Do This On Purpose  
User currently offlineBristolFlyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2296 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2106 times:

The latest item to be stolen in mass quantities is GPS units with gangs going around stealing up to 50 units a night each then selling them easily to pawn shops (according to an NPR report I heard today). Very few people don't bother to register them and ownership is hard to prove.

A few years ago car stereos were getting stolen, so they increased security for those (removable faces etc)

Then cell phones were getting stolen left, right and center so security was increased for those (stolen units getting blocked from the network etc)

So there's a trend forming here - the electronics companies make a must-have product, launch it with no security features, stacks of them get stolen (which means more and more repeat sales of their product boosting revenue) and only then do they start to introduce security features, usually calling them a product 'feature'.

They're making a lot of money out of this crime and I reckon they're doing it on purpose. I mean, they can't think for a moment that a high dollar, compact electronic item with no security features ISN'T going to get stolen can they?

What say you?


Fortune favours the brave
40 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5710 posts, RR: 31
Reply 1, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2094 times:



Quoting BristolFlyer (Thread starter):
What say you?

I do believe that Satnavs were the "must steal" product for thieves this Christmas. A taxi driver told me that, not only do you have to remove the unit when parking the car, you have to remove the holder, AND ALSO clean away any marks it may leave on the windscreen, as this is a dead giveaway that there is probably one hidden inside the car.


User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2078 times:



Quoting BristolFlyer (Thread starter):
What say you?

Your no by any chance related to black bird now are you?



User currently offlineFantikerz From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 111 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2077 times:

I don't think it's the manufacturer that is responsible, because a lot of the thefts usually come from careless people, leaving things out in the open.

Something like a GPS is an easy target, it sits behind your car window on the dashboard after all. Theifs probably aren't going to bust open your car unless they know something of value is inside.


User currently onlineTugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5589 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2073 times:



Quoting BristolFlyer (Thread starter):
So there's a trend forming here - the electronics companies make a must-have product, launch it with no security features, stacks of them get stolen (which means more and more repeat sales of their product boosting revenue) and only then do they start to introduce security features, usually calling them a product 'feature'.

They're making a lot of money out of this crime and I reckon they're doing it on purpose. I mean, they can't think for a moment that a high dollar, compact electronic item with no security features ISN'T going to get stolen can they?

Problem is if a manufacturer starts out with one "fully featured" in the beginning with all the security bells and whistles then that manufacturer will be more expensive than the rest and likely it won't sell enough (because the problem just isn't known or bad enough) and they'll loose money or go out of business.

Tug



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineDuff44 From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 1723 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 2053 times:



Quoting BristolFlyer (Thread starter):
So there's a trend forming here - the electronics companies make a must-have product, launch it with no security features, stacks of them get stolen (which means more and more repeat sales of their product boosting revenue) and only then do they start to introduce security features, usually calling them a product 'feature'.

Simple... don't own any of that stuff, don't get it stolen.  yes 



I'll rassle ya for a bowl of bacon!
User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 2041 times:



Quoting BristolFlyer (Thread starter):
They're making a lot of money out of this crime and I reckon they're doing it on purpose.

Yeah, probably, but:

Quoting Duff44 (Reply 5):

Simple... don't own any of that stuff, don't get it stolen. yes

OR

If you own that stuff; protect the effing kit!!!

I guarantee that the people getting ripped off are those 'it won't happen to me' dumb asses who leave that kind of kit on their dash for everyone to see. Of course the thieves see it, and steal it, duh.


User currently offlineHickoryShampoo From Djibouti, joined Dec 2007, 144 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 2031 times:



Quoting TedTAce (Reply 6):
I guarantee that the people getting ripped off are those 'it won't happen to me' dumb asses who leave that kind of kit on their dash for everyone to see. Of course the thieves see it, and steal it, duh.

 thumbsup 

I make reports every day where some twit has his/her vehicle burgled because they've left something tasty in plain view on the front seat. "Where was your laptop?" "On the front seat." "You're a dumbass." "My life's work was on it." "Did you back it up?" "No!" "Dumbass."

It's a simple fact that a thief is more likely to move on to a better target if he doesn't see anything in your vehicle worth stealing. How hard is it to tuck something as portable as a GPS unit in your pocket/briefcase/etc?



This place is cashed, so I'm out. Someone PM me when A.net comes back.
User currently offlineBok269 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 2104 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 2011 times:

Another thing to consider is that most of the portable/aftermarket GPS units are designed to be easy to install without messing with your vehicle's internals. For the most part, if its easy to mount, its easy to unmount and steal.


"Reality is wrong, dreams are for real." -Tupac
User currently offlineA380US From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 2008 times:

Well actually these things do have some security but...
when most products start there are going to be some problems



www.JandACosmetics.com
User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13113 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 1946 times:

In northern New Jersey where I live, there has been a huge rise in the theft of car portable GPS systems. Probably most are stolen by druggies or others out of cash taking advantage of an unlocked or poorly secured car, the GPS out on the seat and the telltail window bracket screaming "I HAVE PORTABLE GPS SYTEM IN THE CAR".

User currently offlineSignol From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2007, 3005 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1844 times:

Something to be carefull of, a spate of GPS thefts from Alton Towers (a theme park). Theives then use GPS to locate the owner's "Home" setting, and then break in, knowing the family is out for the full day at said theme park. So, instead of "home", set the "home" setting to the nearest police station  Smile

I for one won't have a GPS, I prefer route planning for myself with maps / atlas.

signol



Flights booked: none :(
User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5150 posts, RR: 33
Reply 12, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1843 times:



Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 1):
AND ALSO clean away any marks it may leave on the windscreen, as this is a dead giveaway that there is probably one hidden inside the car.

TIP: NEVER EVER program your address under the "home" button. A lot of theives go around airport car parks looking for cars with these tell-tale rings on the window. Steal the GPS, hit the HOME button, then find your house and burgle that too while your on holiday.

If you must save your address, bookmark it but name it as the street.



That'll teach you
User currently offlineBlueShamu330s From UK - England, joined Sep 2001, 2932 posts, RR: 25
Reply 13, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1841 times:

Simple answer if you're buying a new car, fork out the extra $$$ for factory fitted kit.

If you're unlucky enough to get your portable one stolen twice, that's the cost of the factory option already.

Why give the thieving toe rags an opportunity?

Shamu



So I drive a 4x4. So what?! Tax the a$$ off me for it...oh, you already have... :-(
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14026 posts, RR: 62
Reply 14, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1841 times:

On the German Land Rover forum, one guy described how in Southern France two guys on a scooter tried to steal his wife's handbag from the back of his Defender (the rear sliding windows are notorious for the ease they can be opened from the outside) while he was standing at a traffic light.
The would-be thieves didn't count though on "Hasso" sleeping in the back, a German sheperd, "who bites first and and then wags his tail, being happy about the snack".

Jan


User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5430 posts, RR: 14
Reply 15, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 1794 times:



Quoting Fantikerz (Reply 3):
because a lot of the thefts usually come from careless people, leaving things out in the open.



Quoting Duff44 (Reply 5):
Simple... don't own any of that stuff, don't get it stolen.



Quoting TedTAce (Reply 6):
If you own that stuff; protect the effing kit!!!

I guarantee that the people getting ripped off are those 'it won't happen to me' dumb asses who leave that kind of kit on their dash for everyone to see. Of course the thieves see it, and steal it, duh.



Quoting HickoryShampoo (Reply 7):
because they've left something tasty in plain view on the front seat.

I notice everyone blames the victim here. No one is laying blame where it belongs: the thief.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineHickoryShampoo From Djibouti, joined Dec 2007, 144 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 1776 times:



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 15):
No one is laying blame where it belongs: the thief.

The thief is certainly to blame and they each deserve a swift kick to the groin. The point is that if you take away the factor of giving them something to steal, you're less likely to become a victim. There will always be theives. We can whine and moan about how sad our society is that we can't even leave nice things in our cars, but the simple fact is that there will always be crime. All we can realistically do is make ourselves less of a target by using some common sense.



This place is cashed, so I'm out. Someone PM me when A.net comes back.
User currently offlinePetertenthije From Netherlands, joined Jul 2001, 3369 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 1767 times:

The problem is that even if you remove the thing out of sight, there will still be a "hickey" on the window where the holder was attached. So a build-in version is always better. Unless you want to clean the window everytime you park of course.


Attamottamotta!
User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1739 times:



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 15):
the thief.

I guess you don't understand why the term entrapment even exists.  Yeah sure


User currently offlineDaedaeg From United States of America, joined Feb 2003, 657 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (6 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1696 times:

I always lock my GPS in the glove compartment. I had my car broken into a couple months ago and luckily the theives couldn't get to it.


Everyday you're alive is a good day.
User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5430 posts, RR: 14
Reply 20, posted (6 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 1627 times:



Quoting Petertenthije (Reply 17):
guess you don't understand why the term entrapment even exists

I understand what entrapment is and why it exists. What I don't understand is why you would bring it up here. We are talking about the morality of people that steal (the conversation drifted rather lazily in that direction). I asked the question as to why everyone feels that the victim bears some responsibility. I don't live in a Utopian, idealist world (I leave that to the liberals). I'm a realist. And as I realist, the way we stop these random thefts, is we punish, harshly, within the bounds of the Bill of Rights, the alleged thieves.

I should not have to vary the way I do things because there are thieves in the world.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineTedTAce From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (6 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1615 times:



Quoting Fr8Mech (Reply 20):
I should not have to vary the way I do things because there are thieves in the world.

I agree with the sentiment, but the ultimate point I have is that sometimes situations present themselves that make people who ordinarily would take a pass, do something they might end up regretting. I doubt that most of the people burgled in the OP's story were victims of otherwise well intentioned people, but maybe a few of them were. All I know is that I grew up in a city where theft was common, and learned fast that if you want to hold on to something, don't let anyone know you have it.


User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 53
Reply 22, posted (6 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1600 times:



Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 12):
TIP: NEVER EVER program your address under the "home" button.

How hopeless a navigator would you have to be to need instructions ALL THE WAY back to your own bloody house?  scratchchin 



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineJetstar From United States of America, joined May 2003, 1647 posts, RR: 10
Reply 23, posted (6 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1585 times:
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Quoting Signol (Reply 11):
Something to be carefull of, a spate of GPS thefts from Alton Towers (a theme park). Theives then use GPS to locate the owner's "Home" setting, and then break in, knowing the family is out for the full day at said theme park. So, instead of "home", set the "home" setting to the nearest police station

If a thief wants to find out your home address, all he has to do is look at the registration or insurance certificate that every one carries in their usually unlocked glove compartments.

I have a Magellan GPS and have never used the suction cup bracket, In my car or when I go on the road and rent a car I just place it on the center console, the screens are so small to begin with that I rely more on the voice commands than the screen. When I leave the car for a few minutes I slide it under the seat or for a longer period of time just put it in my pocket and take it with me. I never leave it in the car overnight, even in my garage.


User currently offlineFr8Mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5430 posts, RR: 14
Reply 24, posted (6 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1582 times:



Quoting TedTAce (Reply 21):

I grew up in Flatbush, Brooklyn, NY. I'm not saying that I don't do things to prevent theft, I'm saying I shouldn't have to. There is no fear of the police for petty crimes. Big to medium city police departments (big generalization coming here, but I'm comfortable with it) are too busy to after petty theft and small change B&E. My point is that the small stuff should be a priority. Bring the little stuff to heel and the big stuff will get easier.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
25 Post contains images Dc9northwest : The beauty of apartments. One address, countless apartments
26 Signol : Ah, this is not the case in the UK - we are encouraged never to keep insurance / registration documents in the car. Likewise driving licenses should
27 Post contains images Skidmarks : I dont have a GPS/Satnav. If I don't know where I am going, I use a map. Apart from directions to a particular place a map also gives a view of the su
28 Cumulus : My Garmin has the facility to enter a pin and there is a sticker on the front of it saying "Pin Protected", so maybe a deterrent.
29 Banco : No, I don't have one either. I am weakening though, because of the endless frustrations of trying to get round insane town centre one way systems whe
30 IAirAllie : I got one for Christmas. Not something I really wanted but now that I have it it's really useful. To answer the home question. Lets say you've naviga
31 Post contains images BlueShamu330s : That's how he once ended up on the Isle of Man A Victor Meldrew car, if ever there was one !!! Shamu
32 Post contains images Skidmarks : Absolutely no need for your ageist and hurtful comments. I shall apply to JGPH1A for an instant Fatwah to be issued immediately!! Andy
33 Post contains links and images BlueShamu330s : And why should anyone who wears a thong be taken seriously? Wish More Men Would Wear Thongs/strings (by Orion737 Jan 30 2008 in Non Aviation) Shamu
34 Post contains images Skidmarks : Evil boy!! He will have you hung, drawn and sent to Sweden for your horrid comments! Andy
35 Post contains images BlueShamu330s : Sharia law can't come a moment too soon Shamu
36 Asuflyer05 : That's the thing that scares me about having a standalone GPS Nav. The one I have now is built in my car and it is convenient because I don't have to
37 Jetstar : So you are saying in the UK that you don’t have to carry your drivers license with you when you are out driving. What happens if you are stopped by
38 Banco : Correct. It's because there is no requirement to carry an identity card in this country. In the US, effectively there is. They take all your details
39 Post contains images Fbgdavidson : Leave a stack of map books on the passenger seat as a deterrent My father's nav system updates you on the traffic on the drive home so it is useful to
40 Post contains images Leezyjet : I always leave my glove box open so any potential theif can look inside and see that aside from a packet of tissues, a pen and some other junk, there
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