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Japanese Cruel Whailing Tactics  
User currently offlineJoKeR From Serbia, joined Nov 2004, 2235 posts, RR: 9
Posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 6819 times:

"Subdued" Japanese have ticked-off the Ozzies with this photo being released in Australia.  hissyfit 

It shows a mother whale and her calf being brutally harpooned while nursing off Antarctic international waters yesterday.

The Australian Government branded the Japanese hunting tactics as barbaric, cruel and inhumane and has threatened unspecified action.... haven't we heard this kind of rhetoric before though... and each time, the Japs get away....  sad 




Kafa, čaj, šraf?
18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGkirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24904 posts, RR: 56
Reply 1, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 6791 times:

Yup, something needs to be done about the Japanese whalers before we end up with a species going exinct.


When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineGman94 From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 1239 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6763 times:

Big version: Width: 549 Height: 382 File size: 36kb


Some Guneboat diplomacy is necessary, but most countries won't say boo to Japan.



British Airways - The Way To Fly
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3829 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6758 times:

Has anyone tried whale sushi? Looks delicious...




Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineQFA380 From Australia, joined exactly 9 years ago today! , 2060 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6741 times:

We Australians are starting to get a little angry at the Japanese. I've heard that some tourists have been copping some flak from locals who are disgusted by this slaughter. I'm pretty happy with what our government is doing although a little more wouldn't go astray. Japan is one of our biggest trading parters and compared to other nations we are doing quite abit. As has been said them killing whales will affect our fairly substantial whale watching tourism that happens during our winter.

User currently offlineJpax From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1018 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 6719 times:

Not just the whales, but look at the other videos on websites such as YouTube. There are videos of them cutting the throats of LIVING dolphins after being dumped on the floor. Disgusting and barbaric.  Sad

User currently offlineSlider From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6781 posts, RR: 34
Reply 6, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6696 times:

That raises a good point--why do the Japanese do this? Is it all occurring in their waters?

Or is there some treaty that allows them to do it?

It's not for subsistence, that's for sure.


User currently offlineJpax From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1018 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6647 times:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0b/Whaling_in_the_Faroe_Islands.jpg/800px-Whaling_in_the_Faroe_Islands.jpg


 Sad


User currently offlineBabybus From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 6641 times:

I love Japan and I have many wonderful Japanese friends but this sort of thing makes my blood boil.

The deliberate and planned torture and slaughter of wild animals is completely unacceptable in the 21st century.


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21406 posts, RR: 54
Reply 9, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6614 times:



Quoting Slider (Reply 6):
That raises a good point--why do the Japanese do this? Is it all occurring in their waters?

No.

Quoting Slider (Reply 6):
Or is there some treaty that allows them to do it?

Not exactly. That is why they're disguising it as "research" activity instead of outright hunting, It's the last loophole that allows them to claim compliance with the international regulations - just barely and disputedly.

As far as I'm aware it is a mixture of nationalism ("they can't make us stop!"), tradition (whale meat isn't even particularly coveted by japanese consumers - its sales are subsidized as far as I know), a somewhat outdated fear of resource starvation and at least in part a political maneuver that's basically about job preservation and a feared political backlash in the affected local fishing/whaling communities.


User currently offlineAgill From Sweden, joined Feb 2004, 1006 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6606 times:



Quoting Klaus (Reply 9):
That is why they're disguising it as "research" activity instead of outright hunting

So far they have come to the conclusion that whales die if you shoot them with harpoons. However more studies seem to be needed to confirm the results.


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21406 posts, RR: 54
Reply 11, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 6599 times:



Quoting Agill (Reply 10):
So far they have come to the conclusion that whales die if you shoot them with harpoons. However more studies seem to be needed to confirm the results.

Maybe they should now check if their breathtaking discoveries also apply to humans as well - why not start with the politicians promoting this kind of "research"...?  mischievous 


User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 12, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 6570 times:



Quoting Klaus (Reply 11):
Quoting Agill (Reply 10):
So far they have come to the conclusion that whales die if you shoot them with harpoons. However more studies seem to be needed to confirm the results.

Maybe they should now check if their breathtaking discoveries also apply to humans as well - why not start with the politicians promoting this kind of "research"...?

All disturbingly close to the truth. Last month the Japanese officialdom presented their case in a long article to the Syd Morning Herald and stressed the research, but were unable to cite a single research paper or outcome, apart from the one that Agill indicates!

It seems to be a fool some of the people all of the time........ effort.


User currently offlineRara From Germany, joined Jan 2007, 2054 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 6549 times:



Quoting Babybus (Reply 8):

The deliberate and planned torture and slaughter of wild animals is completely unacceptable in the 21st century.

I'm not so sure about that. Torture, no - but I wouldn't think the Japanese are out to torture whales, they just want to kill and eat them. Killing is rarely pleasant for the victim. And slaughter... I don't know about you, but I eat slaughtered wild animals all the time. And I've got a better feeling about it that eating slaughtered domestic animals.

I think it's more the issue of preservation and protection here. And in this regard, the whale hunt is despicable, but yet needs to be placed in a larger context. What we (all nations) are currently doing to our seas is truly criminal. We're exploiting them to such a degree that if we continue at that pace, we'll have rotted out most maritime life by 2050. It's the highest time to act internationally to restrict fishing and make it sustainable.

The thing with whales (and even more dolphins) is, they're likeable - whereas soles, cods or hakes might not be. Therefor, a slaughtered whale, terrible as it is, makes the headlines, while whole populations of fish disappear due to overfishing all the time without hardly anybody taking note.



Samson was a biblical tough guy, but his dad Samsonite was even more of a hard case.
User currently offlineConfuscius From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 3829 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 6473 times:

Reply #7 kinda reminds me of an aerial picture of Pinal Airpark or Davis-Monthan.


Ain't I a stinker?
User currently offlineA380US From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 6471 times:



Quoting Confuscius (Reply 16):
Reply #7 kinda reminds me of an aerial picture of Pinal Airpark or Davis-Monthan.

I was thinking the same thing



www.JandACosmetics.com
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 16, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 6452 times:



Quoting Rara (Reply 15):
The thing with whales (and even more dolphins) is, they're likeable - whereas soles, cods or hakes might not be. Therefor, a slaughtered whale, terrible as it is, makes the headlines, while whole populations of fish disappear due to overfishing all the time without hardly anybody taking note.

Aside from the whales, in the southern ocean there were populations of fur seals, more recently a number of tuna species, the Patagonian toothfish, the orange roughy and probably quite a few I have forgotten.

The Patagonian toothfish and the orange roughy are deep sea fish that grow very slowly - to be saleable, they probably need to be 20+ years old. As I understand it the trawlers are sweeping the sea floor bare of the whole populations and it will take something like 30 to 40 years to restore some if indeed they do come back.

It is similar to what happened to the Grand Banks cod fisheries.

As Rara writes, whales are just one of the more spectacular parts of the whole issue of wrecking our oceans. There is also the point that if Japan is willing to stand for so much bad publicity over whales, how much more determined will it be to finish off the tuna stocks before anyone other than a few insignificant southern countries raise a fuss?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_roughy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patagonian_toothfish

In which entry the following sentence is noteworthy:
"According to The Antarctica Project, "It is common practice in the illegal fishery to dynamite the [Sperm and Killer] whales when they are discovered in the area where the fishing takes place"[1][2] and "…hundreds of thousands of endangered albatrosses and petrels dive for the [fish] bait and become hooked and drowned.""

Amazing what goes on - out of sight, out of mind!


User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 17, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 6428 times:

What is now reply 16 lacks a bit of context after the sudden extinction of a few other posts.

I was commenting on a suggestion that catching whales in the Antarctic waters is similar to, or indeed is poaching. A related activity has been Japanese tuna fishing in Australian controlled waters.
"It should be noted that this is as well as Japanese fishing boats having
broken AGREED tuna quotas in Australian waters for some years, probably
over 10 years. And some of the tuna stocks are severely depleted." was previously posted and appears relevant to the issue.

The tuna fishing relates to a jurisdiction where the Japanese acknowledge Australia does have legal authority, but it appears that they have systematically gone over their quotas. It is not clear if this has been with their government's knowledge, but that seems at the very least likely. It is an example where the Japanese have ignored well documented and AGREED data on the level of catches that would endanger the tuna stocks.

The whaling can in many ways be regarded as an extension of that kind of activity to a different area for a different type of catch. Even the Japanese have agreed that their tuna fishing has been in part illegal, although nobody down here is holding their breath waiting for them to conform to the agreements.

http://www.ausfish.com.au/vforum/showthread.php?t=53740
Pity that article misses the thousands of the number of tonnes caught.

This next link gives an indication of the extent of the issue.

http://www.abc.net.au/landline/content/2006/s1946367.htm
"SHANE MCLEOD: For the past 20 years, Japan has exceeded its legal limit. It's plundered an extra 178,000 tonnes of southern bluefin tuna. Its value, somewhere between $6 and $8 billion.

HAGEN STEHR: I know Mr Hurry quite well and he is an absolute diplomat.

But I can assure you, those figures are very, very conservative.

SHANE MCLEOD: In fact, Australian authorities concede the true figure is much higher in the vicinity of 250,000 tonnes, worth in excess of $10 billion.

HAGEN STEHR: What is so upsetting is that this could've sacrificed the Australian industry. It is skulduggery. It is an international crime.

SHANE MCLEOD: The initial disbelief and indignation among Japan's fishing authorities has given way to a sense of national embarrassment and shame.

JAPANESE TUNA FISHERMAN (TRANSLATED): Japanese vessels caught too much. Overfishing is a crime, and it's embarrassing. We should reflect on our conduct and I think the Japanese government needs to act so these things won't happen again

SHANE MCLEOD: Yuichiro Harada is the head of OPRT, the Organisation for the Promotion of Responsible Tuna Fishing.

YUICHIDO HARADA, OPRT: Of course we are ashamed that the incident, the overcatch, happened. My controlling mechanism was not effective.

SHANE MCLEOD: Australia declined to launch a prosecution in the International Court of Justice. Instead, Japan has accepted its southern bluefin tuna quota be slashed in half over the next five years, a tacit admission of its guilt.

YUICHIRO HARADA: It's a matter of principle. Japan declared to be responsible fishing nation.

SHANE MCLEOD: Japan has only 2 per cent of the world's population, yet Japanese eat a chunky 10 per cent of the global fish catch."

Maybe a similar exchange will come from the whaling. Note the Japanese embarrassment at getting caught.


User currently offlineQANTAS077 From Australia, joined Jan 2004, 5850 posts, RR: 40
Reply 18, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 6416 times:



Quoting Slider (Reply 6):
why do the Japanese do this?

saving face, if the government of Japan puts an end to its whaling operations its seen as backing down, so they continue with it despite the fact that whale meat is extremely un-popular in Japan.



a true friend is someone who sees the pain in your eyes, while everyone else believes the smile on your face.
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