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Taxes In Other Countries?  
User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 4
Posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1317 times:

I was wondering what kind of income taxes you people have were you live? i'm especially intressed in the US and UK. Here in sweden i have to pay 32% tax on my $1400/month salary. and if you make above $2500 it's a whopping 50% and above $3200 a brutal 60(!)%. I'm not 100% sure on the last 2 figures so please feel free to correct me i'f u think i'm wrong. unbeleivable anyways.

32 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1302 times:

You forgot to mention that it the income tax depends
on which county you live in. I live in a high tax county,
I guess that Lidingö a "suburb" Stockholm is one of the lowest
county taxes in Sweden?


User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1288 times:

Sure, my bad. i think it differs at most 5-6% or something like that. 28% is the lowest and 33-34% the most in the "tax group" you are in when you make $1400/month. This is pure speculation from my side, anyone who knows better, please fill in. And also you guys from overseas etc, please share your tax experienses too. I'm very curious  Smile

User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1285 times:

Like said the more you make the more tax %, so thats
why you have this "tax columns" and you don´t calculate with % (yes, I do salaries for a living!)....


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1277 times:

German income tax is between 19.9% and 48.5% with numerous deduction opportunities.

User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1266 times:

Sounds good Klaus, better than here anyways. Now i would like to enjoy some more replies  Smile  Sleepy

User currently offlineCPDC10-30 From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2000, 4781 posts, RR: 23
Reply 6, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 1264 times:

In Canada, most people pay about 25-30% in income taxes. If you make only $1400/month (which would be difficult to live on), your taxes would be around 10% or so. The first 9000 is tax free, and there are other exemptions.

User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1257 times:

I'm getting $1400 on the work i do in the summers but i do get the same as new hires. And yes, it's a very shitty pay and i have no intensions to work there more than i have to (to pay for flightschool or till i start college). What's really pissing me off is that this government (the swedish that is) is doing everything they can to stop people from getting even remotely wealthy or having financial security. If i make $8300 as a Captain at SAS for example, i have to pay somewhere around 60% tax on that which leaves me $3220 in my pocket. I think the taxes here are totally unmotivated. Though i can agree that high income takers can pay a little more tax but hell not 60%. In a perfect world a income tax of around 15-20% for low income takers increasing to around 30-35% tops would be motivated. i do appriceate certain things i get for the tax money but there are many things that are being taken care of poorly even though they are supposed to be paid with the taxpayers money. Just my $0.02

User currently offlineRyanb741 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 3221 posts, RR: 15
Reply 8, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1240 times:

In the UK:

The first £4000 ($6000) are tax free.
Then you pay 10% on earnings of £4000-£10000 ($6000-$15000).
Then it's 22% on the earnings from £10000-£28,000 ($15000-$36000). After that it's 40%.

Please note it operates on a tier system, so if you earn £30000 per year you don't pay 40% flat, rather it's nothing on the first £4000, then 10% up to £10,000 and then 22% from £10,000-£28,000. You would in effect only pay 40% tax on the earnings above £28,000 (i.e. £2,000 in the above example).



I used to think the brain is the most fascinating part of my body. But, hey, who is telling me that?
User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 18
Reply 9, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1236 times:

Swedish taxes sound like Dutch taxes.
But do you also have our 19.5% salestax, plus staggering social security premiums?



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineHepkat From Austria, joined Aug 2000, 2341 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 1226 times:

I read somewhere that the U.S. has the lowest taxes of all industrial countries.

In the U.S., you have 2, sometimes 3 types of taxes that we pay. The first, which EVERYONE MUST pay, is the federal tax. This is the same in all 50 states, and depends on how much you earn. I'm just looking at an old payslip from college (1996), in which I earned $1000 monthly, with $80 (8%) going to the feds. I believe the highest percentage you can possibly pay is something like 30%, and only if you make over $200,000 yearly/$16,666 monthly. This was the case a few years ago, so I think it should be roughly the same nowadays.

After federal taxes, you pay state taxes. Now, not every state in the union taxes its citizens, eg., Florida, North Dakato and Alaska do not collect income taxes. As a matter of fact, Alaska PAYS you to live in their state with a yearly stipend derived from oil revenues, or so I've heard. My home state of NY does collect income taxes, and the most I've ever paid was about 3 or 4%. State income taxes tend to be much lower than federal income taxes.

After state taxes, then comes your city taxes, which thankfully only few cities collect. Of course, my home city of NYC collects city taxes, but it's also very low. But let's not forget value added taxes, which in NYC is a whopping 8.25%, I believe that's the highest in the U.S.! Most cities pay a more modest 3 to 5%.

All in all, for Americans, the taxes you pay greatly depends on where you live. We all pay federal taxes, but only some of us pay state and city taxes. I believe residents of NYC altogether pay the highest taxes in the union, but I'd love to hear from other Americans about their experiences.

We also have very numerous deductions that can lower your tax bill. Giving to charity is one way to lower your bill, which is why Americans and American companies go to great lengths to make sure they give generous amounts to charities each year. Compared to EU countries, we certainly pay a lot less and deduct a lot more. I spent a lot of time in Sweden, and you guys are right, the Swedish government seems to do everything in their power to prevent citizens from amassing any type of small fortune. Here in Vienna, many of my friends have no concept of the word deductions.


User currently offlineAY-MD11 From Finland, joined Feb 2001, 472 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 1219 times:

Then its the shame shitty Tax than in Finland.I pay tax about 25% a month and thats not even the worst.I just think we pay more tax than our Swedish naghbours.. Sad

User currently offlineAvion From Bouvet Island, joined May 1999, 2205 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1211 times:

Here in Switzerland its pretty much the same as in the US. There's federal tax and tax that varies by canton. The tax in my canton goes from 8-30%. My canton has pretty high tax.
Capital gains and inheritance is not taxed. So that puts us at the lower end. Maybe the lowest of europe. Also there is lots of deductible stuff, like money you used for your retirement money, money you used for educationa and so on.

Tom


User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1198 times:

Dear Jwenting!
Do you mean VAT (Value added tax?), its different on different things highest is 25% of the value of the product, some products are less 12% and 6%. I can tell
you that Swedish taxes are worse than Dutch ones,
but some things are cheaper here like real estate....


User currently offlineHepkat From Austria, joined Aug 2000, 2341 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1187 times:

I believe the Dutch pay the highest taxes in the world, according to a Times (or was it Newsweek?) report I read. Over there you just pay and pay and never stop paying for everything. I wonder what makes their State more expensive to run than every other?

User currently offlineHepkat From Austria, joined Aug 2000, 2341 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1182 times:

Oops, my bad! I meant the Belgians, not the Dutch.

User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6434 posts, RR: 54
Reply 16, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1173 times:

When doing the total calculation, then there isn't much difference:

How much do you pay for high quality health care insurance?

How much does your employer pay to your health care insurance?

How much "salary tax" does your employer pay for employing you?

Do you have stupid tax stickers on your windscreen like in Switzerland and Austria.

Etc. etc.

I can say ZERO to all this, and consequently I pay a high income tax. Even my windscreen is totally transparant - except when I go on holiday in Switzerland  Pissed

In addition my streets are for traffic only. No people live in cardboard boxes on my streets, as we see in some low tax countries. That's great comfort, not only for those who don't have to live on the street, but also for me when I use the streets. Having seen the opposite in some foreign countries I would say that it is sort of "luxury". And I love my luxury life style even if I have to pay a high price for it.

Regards, Preben Norholm



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1166 times:

No people live in cardboard boxes on my streets, as we see in some low tax countries.

Oh really? I live in a small town in Southwestern sweden, 50km outside Gothenburg and i actually have seen homeless people even here. Then i can't imagine how it looks like in a city like Stockholm (apart from what iv'e seen on tv). As i said i'm not all that anti-taxes but the tax levels certainly are not motivated when there's things like this happening on the streets. Besides that, how many times isn't it that you've heard of politicians that spend the taxpayers money on personal expenses like stripclubs etc. For these levels to be motivated it takes a perfect control and spending of the citizens money (which most likely is impossible).


User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6434 posts, RR: 54
Reply 18, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1159 times:

Dear Mika, 50 km outside Gothenburg, homeless people, that's not caused by economic shartage, that must be some civil servants not doing their job properly.

And you ask, how is it then in large cities like Stockholm?

I am often in Stockholm, all over the central town. In fact my very first flight on a passenger plane was CPH - ARN on a SAS DC-8-55. I have never seen homeless people there. It's a wonderful city.

When the ferry comes in from Finland, then there are some people who "can't find their home" easily, but that's a different thing.

But you are right, there is always some degree of curruption in every civil service, and that costs a lot of taxpayer's money. It's a constant struggle to minimize that. But please never make "curruption in the service" a reason for not having the service at all.

Regards, Preben Norholm



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlinePacificjourney From New Zealand, joined Jul 2001, 2732 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 1154 times:

My job in Japan pays 540,000 yen a month on which I pay 5.5 % tax. Another 1.5% goes for the national health insurance and thats it ! Low isn't it ?

I really don't know how it is all worked out here as I used to have a job paying 300,000 yen per month on which I payed 13% ????

Like most other people I also get 4 months 'bonus' a year which is tax free. National sales tax (consumptuion tax) is 5%.

Tax returns are very strange. There are almost no deductions to be claimed except for farmers and your company does the return for you. If the govt. owes you money they send it in if you oew the govt. they seem to just throw it away !!

The real killers in Japan are estate, death, gift and capital gains taxes. All 50% and up !

Due to tax treaties I don't need to declare any income for my home country (New Zealand) but I am also a US resident so I have to file a return there. This consists of claiming a Foreign Earned Income exclusion (up to $74,000) which is US tax exempt. The US IRS doesn't actually ask for proof of this earning so guess who only earns $72,000 a year ?

Someone above claimed that US had the lowest taxes in the world. I'm no expert but no way is this true. Whenever I have lived there I was always amazed how much americans did pay and how little they got for their money.

Good thread this one. Taxes fascinate me.



" Help, help ... I'm being oppressed ... "
User currently offline174thfwff From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1151 times:

My dad pays almost 39-43% in taxes. It's a friggin joke.

User currently offlineLubcha132 From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 2776 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1148 times:

"taxes? you mean like the lone star state?"
(see if anyone gets that Big grin )

Josh


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 22, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1144 times:

Don´t mess with taxes!!!  Big thumbs up

User currently offlineMika From Sweden, joined Jul 2000, 2881 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1129 times:

....that must be some civil servants not doing their job properly.

Of course it is, i have yet to see a homeless person who actually do have a job. If it would be that bad that if you do work and still can't afford a shelter for yourself then this country would be a bomb waiting to go off.

My point is that the taxmoney should help people like that off from the streets. Just my 0.2SEK


User currently offlineHepkat From Austria, joined Aug 2000, 2341 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (12 years 6 months 1 week 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1123 times:

Well, here in Vienna, taxes are sky high, and if there're any homeless people around, I certainly have never seen them.

So I guess somewhere, some civil servants are doing their jobs.


25 JetService : Are we only talking Federal Income taxes here? That's if you take the percentage of my gross income I actually made (before deductions) against the ta
26 N400QX : Federal income tax in the US: 10-36.9%. Too much. Way too much.
27 Polaris : "taxes? you mean like the lone star state?" Yes, as in Dollars, Taxes!
28 Dasa : Here in Australia, my family pays something like 47% Federal Income Tax. This is however, the highest rate... from 47%, it goes down according to inco
29 Docpepz : Singapore's direct taxation is one of the lowest in the world You're taxed on a sliding scale from 2% for the first $7500 earned to a maximum of 24% f
30 Qatar : Qatar (where i come from) and the neighbouring bahrain have no income taxes.
31 Airplanetire : I don't have a job because I'm too young, but I know the sales tax in my area. If I buy something, the total of the sales tax that I pay to the state
32 Joona : Finland is the country with the 5th highest taxation in the world, if I remember correctly. Last year our politicians voted for raising their salary.
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