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Australia Should Become A Republic  
User currently offlineQANTASforever From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1038 times:

As Australians we have known the issues for a while now, so theres no point in me giving a long winded biased (towards a republic) intro just to fuel the fire. So let the games begin. Should Australia become a republic? Or continue to be a static nation?

29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineOzarkD9S From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 4878 posts, RR: 22
Reply 1, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1011 times:

Republic!


Next Up: STL-TPA-BWI-PWM-BWI-STL
User currently offlineVapourTrails From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1007 times:

Mmm.. imagine if the 1999 referendum had had a different outcome ..that's all I'm saying.. Big thumbs up

User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 54
Reply 3, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1000 times:

As a Brit, I'm quite often asked what I think about this subject by Australians, and I'm always surprised that we're asked. I mean, what has it got to do with us? It's your country, do what you like. No-one in Britain cares what you do! It isn't any of our business.

The ties between Britain and Australia are far deeper than just the issue of the Queen, its a side issue.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineDasa From East Timor, joined Aug 2001, 760 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 995 times:

Republic

_________________________________
Das.A


User currently offlineRyanb741 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 3221 posts, RR: 16
Reply 5, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 990 times:

What difference will it make either way?


I used to think the brain is the most fascinating part of my body. But, hey, who is telling me that?
User currently offlineNZ767 From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 1620 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 985 times:

Republic!
That goes for NZ too.... Smile


User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 19
Reply 7, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 978 times:

Britain should move in and assert its legal rights to the territories of Australia and New Zealand.
You guys were given semi-independence now don't spoil the game by launching a revolution against your rightfull rulers!



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 54
Reply 8, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 975 times:

We're quite capable of arguing between ourselves without having a Dutchman come in and try and provoke us. Big grin


She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16228 posts, RR: 57
Reply 9, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 968 times:

Aus is no less an independent nation by having the Queen as Head of State. It's simply a reflection that the majority of Aussies are of British background and that many British traditions (democracy, rule of law, common law, parliament, the English language) are part of what makes Australia a strong country.




Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineCarmy From Singapore, joined Oct 2001, 627 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 964 times:

Of course Her Majesty should remain as head of state. Her Majesty reflects the common identity held by all British colonies, realms, and Commonwealth countries.

God save the Queen!


User currently offlineMcdougald From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 961 times:

It's an issue for Australians to decide on their own, but if you replaced 'Australia' with 'Canada', I'd probably vote for a republic. (But I don't see such a referendum coming soon: a recent poll suggested that we're generally indifferent on the issue, with many seeing the royals as celebrities more than anything else.)

User currently offlineBanco From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 14752 posts, RR: 54
Reply 12, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 949 times:

The difficulty for all nations who have the Queen as Head of State is what to replace the monarchy with. Whilst it is indeed daft to have someone on the other side of the world as Head of State, it does offer great stability. Unless the HoS is to have executive function, each nation is then looking for a natural born equivalent to the Queen.

When you have elections you have argument. If the Head of State is appointed, then allegations of sleaze and favouritism can come to the fore. As a result, the view is often that the status quo works, so why bother changing it and risking upheaval to a greater or lesser degree.

The fact that many Brits think you're crackers for keeping her is neither here nor there.



She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
User currently offlineCapt.Picard From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 945 times:

Does it really matter? (I ask in a serious tone).

Regards


User currently offlineGo Canada! From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2955 posts, RR: 11
Reply 14, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 928 times:

The question is who do you have instead of the queen, you already have a governer general who is her representive, yet hes involved in controversy at the moment.

do you have a directly elected president? if so do they then have more power than the prmie minister or is the head of state selected by a panel?

The Queen never pokes her nose in austrialian and new zealand affairs, you didnt catch her slapping helen clark for daring to sit down during the national athem, as much i would have done myself!

Austrialia is democratic and independent of britain, yet whats wrong with the queen? does she gobble up all your taxes, in the uk she pays income tax, and whats wrong with being in the commonwealth, what would you do instead?




It is amazing what can be accomplised when nobody takes the credit
User currently offlineIndianguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 923 times:

With the state the British Royalty is in, it better that Brits (not to talk of Australia etc) dump the queen for good.


All Commonwealth nations should continue with Westminster traditions though, with an elected prime minister holding the reins of power and a largely ceremonial president.

-Regards

Roy


User currently offlineN400QX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 910 times:

Well I'm not an aussie and I have no say, but... Long Live the Republic!  Laugh out loud

User currently offlineQANTASforever From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 903 times:

Australia is in a word a sucess.

in almost everything we do we just cant seem to go wrong. So i think that with Australia being in such a good position in almost every sense of the word it makes sense for us to choose to rid ourselves of the dead umbilical cord that ties us to the ashes of the British empire. I want to say to my future children "you can do anything you want in this country".

However at the moment there is one very important role which is reserved for whomever is lucky enough to have a father as the prince of wales or the king of England. So what will be involved. A name change for the governor general to president (this was the prefered model that came out of the republican forum in Canberra in 1999 which involved the retention of a Prime Minister). So for such small practical changes we can achieve a greater sense of national identity, it will fuel national pride and will be the light that guides us into the future.

Thank you England for all that you have done, we have grown up and are ready to face the world alone. But also thank you (sarcastically) for all that you did for us in WWII. This new era will enable us to forge a new history while remembering the battles of the past. (gets off soap box).


User currently offlineNZ767 From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 1620 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 898 times:

Hey Go_Canada,

I'm all for a Republic but what Helen Clark did in sitting down before the Queen and not being in the country for her arrival were just examples of outright disrespect.
These courtesies should simply be shown to ANY visiting Head of State!

Clark embarrasses us again!!!


User currently offlinePacificjourney From New Zealand, joined Jul 2001, 2727 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 895 times:

I think the question is not really a straight yes or no but rather of what instead ?

Certain actions like dropping the monarchy and becoming a republic are pretty much irreversible so Aus. needs to know clearly why they want to change and what this change will achieve. You can liken it to the debate about having casinos. People oppose or support the idea for many reasons but once they are built there is almost no going back. A good reason for caution I think.

Yes having a foreigner on the other side of the world as HOS seems odd but it seems to have worked pretty well so far so why screw with it. What makes a republican form of govt. superior anyway ? Look at Fiji as an example of a solid democracy gone tits up !

Aus. politics and institutions (QLD and NSW police for eg ) can be pretty corrupt at times and would you really want to hand the ultimate say so over to that lot ?

Long considered thought not jingoistic tunb thumping is required for such an important change.



" Help, help ... I'm being oppressed ... "
User currently offlineMx5_boy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 886 times:

Republic of course.

Why should we have a head of state that RESIDES permanently in another nation?

Change the Governor General to el Presidente' and be don't with it.

QEII / Royal Family means nothing to most Aussies any more except as scandalous reading fodder for some bored houswifes.

Cheers,

mb


User currently offlineQANTASforever From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 852 times:

HAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHA so very very true. lol.

User currently offlineGo Canada! From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2955 posts, RR: 11
Reply 22, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 827 times:

i think austrailia has enoguh scandel without the royal family of britain being mentioned.


It is amazing what can be accomplised when nobody takes the credit
User currently offlineDocpepz From Singapore, joined May 2001, 1968 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 814 times:

But didn't 25 000 people line the streets of Adelaide to catch a glimpse of Her Majesty during her recent visit? it does reflect her popularity right.

Would 25 000 people line the streets if say, the Pope came?


User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 805 times:

Well if you want to become a republic hold a referendum.


Oh, wait.


25 QANTASforever : Well yes as you pointed out we did have a referendum......that was fixed for the monarchist ideals of the Australian Liberal party. The result of the
26 Post contains images CPDC10-30 : Intersetingly a majority of Canadians support the status quo, despite what John Manley may have you believe. It is an important distinction that we ha
27 Banco : Canada is indeed an interesting case. I also wonder whether it has anything to do with the lack of friction in the relationship between British and Ca
28 Mcdougald : Here in Canada, there isn't really any momentum in any direction on the issue. Gallup has done polls on whether or not to keep or drop the monarchy, a
29 GDB : Don't be too hard on your very competant film industry, in the past year I've enjoyed 'The Dish' and 'Chopper'.
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