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The Biggest Rogue State Of Them All  
User currently offlineEmiratesLover From Malta, joined Dec 2000, 341 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1731 times:

Given the nature of McCarthyism sweeping the media these days, it is actually quite surprising to think that some brave souls actually have the nerve to speak up against America's foreign policy aspects that hurt people in other parts of the world - and there are many such policies so it is not surprising there are many such people.

Perhaps we need to listen to just two of them.....



Rogue States? America Ought to Know
The Hyperpower Sets Its Own Rules

Phyllis Bennis is a Fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies and author of Calling the Shots: How Washington Dominates Today's UN. Her forthcoming book is Before & After: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Spetember 11th Crisis.

We hear a lot about rogue states these days. You know, the rogue states that refuse to ratify important treaties, the ones who refuse to allow international inspections of their weapons of mass destruction, the ones who ignore U.N. resolutions, who violate human rights with impunity and who refuse to sign on to human rights conventions? You know, those rogue states.

Let's get down to specifics. What would you call a country that produces the highest levels of dangerous chemicals in the world but abandons key negotiations aimed at reversing global warming? How about a country whose leader blithely announces that he is abandoning a quarter-century old arms control treaty, one the whole world understands to be the key to preventing complete nuclear madness? And what about a government that walks out of talks to enforce the biological weapons treaty because it doesn't want international inspectors peeking at its own weapons production facilities? That same country keeps rejecting human rights treaties, even the ones protecting the rights of children.

Sounds pretty roguish, don't you think? Iraq, maybe, or one of those other evil-doers like Iran or North Korea? But oops -- wrong guess. This particular rogue state would be the United States of America.

It's hard for most Americans to think of the United States as a rogue state. We're a democracy, after all. Our elections are free and fair (well, some of the time).

But our foreign policy is far less accountable to democratic ideals, or to the global community than we like to think. The problem isn't isolationism -- we're engaged (at least our military forces and our U.S. manufactured weapons are) all over the world. The problem is unilateralism -- our tendency to act out our unchallenged 'super-power of super-powers' role without concern for what others in the world think.

When the Bush administration came into office last year, unilateralism was suddenly on everybody's radar screen. One of the administration's first acts was to cut off U.S. support to any international family planning institutions that also might provide any separately-funded information to their patients about abortions. Then, what really caught the eye of policymakers and pundits, were Bush's rapid-fire moves to abandon the Kyoto protocol on global warming and the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) treaty.

The United States produces by far the largest amount of greenhouse gases in the world -- the stuff that is destroying the ozone layer and causing dangerous global warming. In 1998, the Clinton administration had already angered most other countries when it refused to sign on to the Kyoto agreement that aimed to roll back greenhouse gas emissions. But international talks had continued, as had efforts to get the United States on board. Until Bush took office. Then, all of a sudden, Kyoto was off Washington's agenda.

In January 2002, the administration rubbed salt into the world's wound, dissing the whole Kyoto process by announcing a separate, unilateral plan. The new plan would, coincidentally, leave current U.S. greenhouse gas levels and the resulting increase in global warming virtually unchanged.

Then came the problem of weapons of mass destruction. In October 1999, the U.S. Senate refused to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, a long-sought effort at keeping the U.S. and Soviet nuclear genies closer to their bottles. The world was not amused. Many, especially in Europe, were outraged, seeing the rejection as the arrogance of what the French had begun calling the "hyper-power." So when Bush announced, in early 2001, that he planned to unilaterally abrogate the 25-year-old ABM treaty, it wasn't only Moscow that felt betrayed. The ABM treaty had served as the linchpin of strategic arms control for a generation. Bush's claim that it was "irrelevant" in the post-Cold War era fooled no one. The only thing that had become irrelevant -- to the United States -- was international concern about the Pentagon's war drive. Our super-power rival had collapsed more than a decade ago, but the government had no intention of changing its own aggressive behavior.

Only two countries in the world have refused to sign the Convention on the Rights of the Child -- Somalia and the United States.
In the summer of 2001, the United States walked out of another international conference, this one on how to enforce the 1972 treaty prohibiting biological weapons. Everybody agreed there needed to be stronger inspections of potential sites where germ weapons could be produced -- what Washington is always accusing Iraq of hiding. But this time it wasn't the Iraqis, it was us -- the U.S. delegation walked out because they refused to accept international inspections of American production facilities which the United States demanded for everyone else.
On the issue of human rights, when it comes to real commitments, backed up by international agreements, Washington falls way behind. Take the Convention on the Rights of the Child. That one should be a no-brainer.

The Convention is, according to UNICEF, "the most widely and rapidly ratified human rights treaty in history..." The Convention sets norms for what governments should provide for parents and their children -- adequate nutrition, compulsory primary education, adequate health care, safe access to play, art, and culture. Only two countries in the world have refused to sign on -- Somalia and the United States.

Unilateralism didn't begin with the Bush administration. Several years ago, the United States antagonized much of the world, including some of our closest allies, when it refused to sign the convention banning anti-personnel landmines.

For years the world had known that the mines -- cheap, easy to use -- were responsible for far more civilian than military deaths. The campaign to prohibit them, led by civil society organizations and governments such as Canada, was based on the vast suffering of civilians, most often children, in places where low-tech, high-casualty wars were taking place, often outside CNN's camera range.

The world needed a ban -- but still today the United States refuses to sign. Why? Because the Pentagon says it needs those anti-personnel mines to protect U.S. troops. What a heartless message our powerful military is sending around the globe, specifically to the legions of landmine victims, children with missing limbs growing up in the poor, mine-infested countries of the world.

Then there's the International Criminal Court. The United States spent years demanding that the world create such a court to insure that those guilty of genocide or war crimes would be held accountable. When the new court was approved, delegates from 120 countries stood and cheered. Only seven countries voted against -- led by the United States at the head of the rejectionist front. Who were Washington's bedfellows? Those stalwart democracies such as China, Israel, Libya, Iraq.

As it turned out, the United States never had any intention of signing on fearful that it would expose American troops around the world to prosecution outside the U.S. justice system. It just demanded a court for the rest of the world. The world cried foul. Finally, in the last days of his presidency, just hours before the signature deadline, on December 31, 2000, lame-duck President Clinton reluctantly signed the treaty endorsing the court -- but he explicitly rejected ever presenting to the Senate for ratification. For the United States, signing the treaty was just a way of making sure it could keep on calling the shots in future negotiations.

The United States is the strongest country in the world -- economically, militarily, strategically. But that doesn't mean we can ignore the international laws and treaties and U.N. resolutions that we demand others obey.

We're still part of the international community -- we still need the U.N. and international law. We face consequences when we throw our weight around -- being kicked off the U.N. Human Rights Commission last spring was one example. After September 11th most of the world's criticism of our unilateralism and arrogance was silenced. But now we stand in danger of losing the human sympathy that followed those attacks. Haven't we -- and the rest of the world -- had enough of Washington's rogue behavior?


Published: Mar 01 2002



Published on Monday, February 25, 2002 in the Philadelphia Inquirer
Mirror, Mirror, On the Wall, Who is the Biggest Rogue of All?In Its Unilateralist Disregard, U.S. is the Real 'Rogue State'
by Richard B. Du Boff and Edward S. Herman

Most people believe that their own country is virtuous and that only others misbehave enough to qualify as international outlaws. But the United States has elevated this popular sentiment to the level of national policy - by designating certain countries, of its own choosing, as "rogue states." The dictionary defines rogue as "a fierce and dangerous animal, like an elephant, that separates itself from its herd." By this standard, the United States, not the piddling tyrannies named by the State Department, is the world's number one rogue. Since it obliterated Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 - cities, not military targets - the United States has bombed 18 countries, and invaded still others, with no declaration of war nor any possibility of retaliation, at least until Sept. 11. In the case of Afghanistan, the United States launched a unilateral war of revenge against a brutal regime of its own creation, although none of the 19 hijackers were Afghan and none of the thousands of "detainees" held in the United States and abroad have been charged with any participation in the crime. Furthermore, the alleged "mastermind," still at large, might well have been turned over to the United States through negotiations - which President Bush rejected outright from the start. All this is defended on the ground that we are "so good" (as the President has said) and always act in the world's interest. But in fact, U.S. actions reflect the power of corporate interests. For example, the United States refused to participate in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-sponsored talks in Paris in May 2001, on ways to crack down on offshore and other tax and money-laundering havens. For any other nation, this would now be highly embarrassing in the age of Enron, but such a thought would never even occur to U.S. policymakers. Or consider Bush's declaration in March 2001 that the Kyoto Protocol was "dead" - all because it might harm the U.S. economy. Bush separates himself from the global consensus based on his reading of U.S. interests alone - and his stance coincides with that of the oil industry, not with the real interests of the American people. Several U.S. unilateral positions have been geared to the demands of the military-industrial complex, and other parties advocating an aggressive foreign policy. The United States has withdrawn from the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, gutting this landmark arms control accord to the dismay of virtually every country in the world. The United States has not ratified the Comprehensive (Nuclear) Test Ban Treaty signed by 164 nations; Bush opposes it. This country rejects the Land Mine Treaty, concluded in Ottawa in December 1997 and signed by 122 countries. This country was also the only nation to oppose the U.N. Agreement to Curb the International Flow of Illicit Small Arms in July 2001. The United States rejects an International Criminal Court because our personnel might become subject to its jurisdiction. The United Nations is treated the same way: When the United States can get the Security Council to do what it wants - say, bomb Iraq in 1991 - it goes that route; if not, as with its invasion of Panama in 1989, it simply disregards the United Nations or uses its veto. In Afghanistan, the administration couldn't be bothered with the United Nations or any other international body to deal with what it declared to be a "crime against humanity": It simply bombed. As for the Guantanamo Bay prisoners, classified as "unlawful combatants," South African jurist Richard Goldstone points out that this is "not a term recognized by international law." If prisoners, they are entitled to POW treatment; if simply criminals, "under the U.S. Constitution, they've got even better protection." But for U.S. leaders, international law is for others, not ourselves. Whether an action involves waging war, with the devastation and death that "precision bombing" brings to a chosen country, or expanding environmental controls, the United States is proclaiming, more loudly than ever, that it will "act unilaterally," whatever the cost to others - and sooner or later to its own people. Richard B. Du Boff is a professor emeritus of economics at Bryn Mawr College. Edward S. Herman is a professor emeritus of finance at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.


81 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLindy field From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 3116 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1599 times:
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I dunno, I think a lot of people ignore the rogues of Malta.

User currently offlineAlpha 1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1590 times:

What would you call a state that allows more freedom than any other nation on the earth?

What would you call a state who's citizens give more in charitable cause that any other state in the world?

What would you call a state who promotes freedom of religion-even a religion that seemingly is at war with it?

What would you call a state where more people emmigrate to fulfill their longings for freedom, to escape totalitarinism, to escape religious persecution?

Keep defending the likes of Al Quaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, Iran and Iraq, EmriatesLover. If you want to look for rogues, look to these murderers. I think you've knocked on the wrong door this time, and we don't want what you're trying to peddle.


User currently offlineArsenal@LHR From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 7792 posts, RR: 20
Reply 3, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1583 times:
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Very interesting articles....


In Arsene we trust!!
User currently offlineAlpha 1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1581 times:

Yeah, about as interesting as a fly on a turd.

User currently offlineLautir From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1579 times:

EmiratesLover provided facts - Alpha 1 provided empty rhetorics...





User currently offlineEal401 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1574 times:

I think that comment proves your open-mindedness in general Alpha 1.

What would you call a state that allows more freedom than any other nation on the earth?

What would you call a state who's citizens give more in charitable cause that any other state in the world?

What would you call a state who promotes freedom of religion-even a religion that seemingly is at war with it?

What would you call a state where more people emmigrate to fulfill their longings for freedom, to escape totalitarinism, to escape religious persecution?


I don't know, what would you call it? Don't recognise any country on the planet from your description. Did recognise the US in the articles above though. Hmmm.


User currently offlinePacificjourney From New Zealand, joined Jul 2001, 2732 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1573 times:

Alpha 1 Yawn, yawn, yawn !!!

Change the record will you please.

Do you have any facts to back up your repeatedly stated claims that the US is the MOST free, charitable, tolerant, etc ? If these are just your opinions that is fine but please state them as opinions and enligten us as to how you came to these conclusions.



" Help, help ... I'm being oppressed ... "
User currently offlineArsenal@LHR From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 7792 posts, RR: 20
Reply 8, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1571 times:
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These 2 articles are a breath of fresh air. Dead spot on.
If u dont like these comments, then tough luck.



In Arsene we trust!!
User currently offline4holer From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 3011 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1572 times:

Cough! Cough! BullshCough! Cough!

A lot of unfounded assumptions incorrectly presented as fact. A dose of reality needed for the author.



Ghosts appear and fade away.....................
User currently offlineLautir From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1565 times:

What´s the "dose of reality" in this world?? 4holer, do you know the truth?


User currently offlineEal401 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1564 times:

And what "reality" do you prescribe 4holer? Hollywood reality perhaps?

User currently offlineLautir From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1548 times:

The Truth.



User currently offline4holer From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 3011 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1546 times:

The truth is that these are opinions of writers. They are written in such a way as to bring the reader to the writer's biased point of view. No country is perfect, not mine and not yours; we all have a stinky brown eye down below. You choose to keep your nose up ours to avoid acknowledging the existence of your own. A lot of Europeans are throwing so many stones within their glass houses! That's the truth.


Ghosts appear and fade away.....................
User currently offlineHeavymetal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1547 times:

One American prisdoner of war was just dragged away and executed by al Qaeda soldiers.

I'd like to ask "Phyliss" how she would feel if we played by the same rules....took the hundreds of al Qaeda prisoners we're feeding, clothing and supplying basic human rights to in groups offshore from Guantanamo and systematically made shark chum out of them. Would she scream to the heavens abour our brutality? Is she doing that now about the animals who just murdered the American? Nyet.

Tell this bitch to save her righteous indignation. Obviously sometime during her life a guy looked at her funny. The petty bitterness that provokes rants like this started then.


User currently offlineEal401 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1537 times:

One American prisdoner of war was just dragged away and executed by al Qaeda soldiers.

That's bad, that is not a good thing to happen. BUT, would anyone be surprised if the same happened vice versa? Even just once?

It's war, sh*t happens. Well, that's what many Americans on here said about Afghan civilian deaths, which numbered much more than those killed yesterday.


User currently offlineAlpha 1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1534 times:

Those who wanted fact, I provided them, even if someone like EAL401 denies it. We are the most charitable nation on the earth, EAL401. You can look it up. We do have more liberties than any nation on the earth, EAL401. Every nation, creed, color and faith is represented in the US because of immigration, EAL401. That's a fact.

But you're so consumed with some kind of hatred for the U.S. that you won't even accept what are facts. Why this hatred EAL, Aresenal, Lautr? Why? Because we ARE the superpower?

The fact is that "article" is an opinion-just like that of Mr. Buchanan was, nothing more, nothing less. Yet you guys howl at Buchanan's opinion, and take this one up as some sort of Gospel truth.

Maybe this is why Europe doesn't deserve to be associated with the U.S. anymore. Because they don't have a clue as to what is real in the world anymore.


User currently offline4holer From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 3011 posts, RR: 9
Reply 17, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1534 times:

There is no such thing as "Hollywood Reality". That is an oxymoron. The people who believe in that do not live within these shores. If you really think that the Hollywood image truly is America, you are a truly simple minded person.

Suggesting deletion of this flame-bait thread.



Ghosts appear and fade away.....................
User currently offlineLautir From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1533 times:

Eal401 - true

User currently offlineAlpha 1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1528 times:

One American prisdoner of war was just dragged away and executed by al Qaeda soldiers.

Oh, for EAL401 and Joona and the like, that's ok-it was only an American, and not one of theirs. I mean, what's one American soldier? I mean, he only got what he deserved for being an American, and for Bush's policy of defending the country, right?


User currently offlineLautir From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1527 times:

http://www.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/asiapcf/central/03/05/ret.afghan.helicopter.horror/index.html

Major Gen. Frank L. Hagenbeck, operation commander - "We body slammed them today and killed hundreds of those guys," Hagenbeck said."

Everything so simple...


User currently offlineAlpha 1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1525 times:

Lautr

EAL401-blind idiot.


User currently offlineNik From Germany, joined Jul 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1525 times:

It must be so great to be American: The Americans are told that they are freest in the, they are told that they are always the "good guys" as Dubya would put it, they are told they are the only ones in the world who enjoy freedom of religion, and we all know that the US is the only country in the world in which people escape persecution and torture.
And, before I forget; the amount of charity given by Americans is higher than for any other country despite the US being the biggest country in the Western world.
It is only a shame that the rest of the world is out to destroy the US. Trying to force the great Americans to accept treaties in the name of evil human rights or environmental concerns that are not real. Or voicing concerns about the American foreign policies just because innocent people who live in places whose names the American President can't pronounce are being killed.
We should all know better than to ever cricicize the greatest country in the world, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.


User currently offlineHeavymetal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1521 times:

Everything so simple...

Nice to hide behind vaugue little poodle-barks.

Debate your point or zip it.


User currently offlineEal401 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1517 times:

Every nation, creed, color and faith is represented in the US because of immigration, EAL401

Exactly the same would apply to the UK.

We are the most charitable nation on the earth, EAL401.

As a whole or per capita (which would be the realistic comparison). Where can I look this up?

But you're so consumed with some kind of hatred for the U.S. that you won't even accept what are facts.

Don't recall being consumed with such hatred. Got more important things to worry about.



There is no such thing as "Hollywood Reality". That is an oxymoron. The people who believe in that do not live within these shores. If you really think that the Hollywood image truly is America, you are a truly simple minded person.

Suggesting deletion of this flame-bait thread.



There's someone who doesn't support freedom of speech and doesn't like to hear opinions other than his own! Maybe a name change to Fascistholer?? This thread gets deleted, so should Alpha 1's anti-Europe one.



25 Alpha 1 : EAL401-you won't see American troops executing a prisoner. If you believe that, you're more naive than I first thought. But again, you ignore the slau
26 Delta-flyer : This essay just proves that in the USA everyone is free to express his/her opinion about anything without fear of reprisal. McCarthyism is dead and bu
27 Post contains links Lautir : Heavymetal "Everything so simple..." It´s war isn´t it, Why so stirred up? If you put soldiers into war you might have casualties. http://www.thevir
28 4holer : Fascistholer. That's pretty funny. Have you actually lived in a fascist state? Not a freedom of speech issue. There are rules in this forum which are
29 Alpha 1 : ROTFL, Nik, you're such a horses ass! Haha!
30 AerLingus : So what do you want us to do about it? Wear Birkies, sing Kumbaya and play tambourines in front of the White House in the hope that Cowboy Dubya will
31 Eal401 : Alpha 1; EAL401-you won't see American troops executing a prisoner. If you believe that, you're more naive than I first thought. I'm naive! ROTFL!!! Y
32 Arsenal@LHR : I suggest deletion dudes!
33 Heavymetal : It´s war isn´t it, Why so stirred up? If you put soldiers into war you might have casualties. Agreed 100 percent. Murdering a prisoner is not a mere
34 Banco : Just on the subject of the execution of prisoners by soldiers, it is perfectly possible that this might occur. American soldiers are no more immune to
35 Pacificjourney : Most charitable nation A By gross bilateral and multilateral aid 1 Japan $10,640,000 2 USA $ 8,786,000 3 France $ 5,742,000 4 Germany $ 5,581,000 5 UK
36 N202PA : All I've got to say is that with all the good that the U.S. has done for the world, and still serving as the #1 refuge for immigrants from abroad, it'
37 B757300 : Sad. If we try to defend America and use one wrong word, we'll get banned. But it is perfectly ok to slam America and anyone who defends it all day lo
38 Alpha 1 : EAL401, there has NOT BEEN a mass slaughter of Afghan civilians. I imagine if such a slaughter, that's only taken place in your mind, so you can vent
39 Staffan : N202PA, it's only one side that is wrong isn't it? And when everyone starts to object, shouldn't that be an indicationd that something isn't heading t
40 Staffan : B757300, name ONE person who used ONE wrong word and got banned?
41 Eal401 : I posted an article on the subject of civilian deaths when it was claimed that the Afghan civilian death toll had exceeded the Sep 11 death toll. The
42 PHX-LJU : Eal401 wrote: >>I don't know, what would you call it? Don't recognise any country on the planet from your description. Did recognise the US in the art
43 Eal401 : PHX-LJU: First stamp I got in my passport was US Immigration at Dulles Airport. Four weeks spent exploring the country, well a line across from DC to
44 Eal401 : In addition to all this Alpha 1 grandly claimed how the US is the most charitable in the world, which has been proved by the quoted extract from a lea
45 Post contains images Ryanb741 : 'Can't we all just get along?'
46 Post contains images Eal401 : Now where would the fun in that be? Alternative answer (in smallish voice): "grumble, grumble - 'spose so"
47 Post contains images Arsenal@LHR : And we'll all live happily ever after
48 Heavymetal : The study was undertaken by a US academic Correction...I believe the study on Afghan casualties you refer to was taken by an American academic whose o
49 N202PA : N202PA, it's only one side that is wrong isn't it? If you had read what I wrote, you would have seen that I clearly stated that the U.S. is not beyond
50 Toady : N202PA: I'm not "against" your country (vehemently, or otherwise) but I find it difficult to acknowledge all the good things done by the US. Why? Bec
51 4holer : ...And GB obviously does no wrong. Exact same good/none of the wrong. Got it. Thanks for the wisdom, guys. Consider us educated about our evil.
52 Staffan : N202PA, sure there are lots of great things the US has done, nobody can deny that, and much of it we are very grateful for too. But think of it from o
53 N202PA : Toady: My apologies...when I said "you" in my previous statement, it was directed more as a general remark to the world than to you in specific. In an
54 N202PA : N202PA, sure there are lots of great things the US has done, nobody can deny that, and much of it we are very grateful for too. But think of it from o
55 Toady : ...And GB obviously does no wrong. Exact same good/none of the wrong. Do you really think so? I disagree with you. Maybe I've not been paying enough a
56 FlyBoeing : We hear a lot about rogue states these days. You know, the rogue states that refuse to ratify important treaties, "Roguism" has little to do with word
57 Toady : N202PA: No need to apologise; I wasn't in the least bit offended by your postings. Nor was I trying to have a 'dig' at you or the US. For what it's wo
58 N202PA : Toady, I didn't think you were...and I'm glad that you understand what I'm saying. I can see and acknowledge that we do sometimes do things wrong, and
59 4holer : N202PA, You were just added too my rather exclusive Respected Users list. Thank you for your articulate and level headed posts. Toady, there have been
60 Staffan : N202PA, what are all the "Europe isn't doing anything to fight terrorism" comments then? Yes that's rather offensive towards Europeans you know, becua
61 4holer : Staffan. I agree with everything you just said. Unbelievable. And like I said, the "We saved your sorry asses..." crowd certainly exists. It's a littl
62 Scorpio : FlyBoeing, but still pose a danger to the world as it and its French and Russian apologists conspire to abrogate the spirit of its meaning. That's whe
63 Arsenal@LHR : Calm down people. Nothing anyone says or claims on this forum will happen, or thats its true.
64 PHX-LJU : Eal401, If I misinterpreted your post, I'm sorry. But it seemed to me that you were just saying, "I don't associate America with freedom and democracy
65 Post contains images N400QX : I can't believe some of you freaks here... We can always drop out of the UN if you'd like... we can put our money and troops elsewhere. Yes, I'd like
66 Alpha 1 : Eal401, call what I said a "blatant lie" if you want. I'll put it right on the mantle with your "Hollywood Reality" and "Mass slaughter of Afghan Civi
67 Twaneedsnohelp : Pacificjourney's figures are absurd. Singapore got #2 in economic freedom and the US #4. Well, if I remember correctly, chewing gum is against the law
68 Pacific : Pacificjouney's economic figures is about how free the nation's economy is. On one extreme, we have the command economy, on the other, a complete free
69 Paulc : Alpha 1 - I think you will find that the UK has been one of the USA strongest supporters post 9/11 (and pre) - we have troops on duty in Kabul (along
70 Eal401 : Alpha 1: I asked you to prove that the US is "murdering" civilians. You are right, manslaughter would have been a more accurate term here. I make the
71 Post contains links and images Aviatsiya.ru : Good to see the same shit is still happening in here The only thing I have to say about this is in response to something Alpha1 wrote: Again, you back
72 Eal401 : Aviatsiya.ru: Waste of breath on your part I'm afraid. The response will be, "The US Army told the truth, everyone else lied." It was the same with th
73 L-188 : Picasso was a no talent smuck with a really bad ear ache. I have seen refridgerators with better art then he put out. But getting back on the subject.
74 EmiratesLover : Wow, wow , wow, It really is an amazing response to my two articles that I posted. But before we go further, I would like to make a few points clear a
75 Alpha 1 : Aviatsiya, it's a pity to have you back. You misread my post, didin't you? I asked Eal401 to show me proof where such events have happened IN THIS CUR
76 FlyBoeing : Hey EmiratesLover: there are many things that America does that hurt people in other parts of the world, and many aspects of American foreign policy t
77 Eal401 : Alpha 1: I never claimed it HAD happened, just suggested it was a possibility. (Refering to the possibility of US armed forces killing prisoners befor
78 Alpha 1 : Eal401, stop putting words in my mouth that I didn't say. I never said "We're American. It won't happen", did I? And you inferred that it was more tha
79 Eal401 : I find something positive to say about the US, I'll say it. I have made such posts. As for putting words in your mouth, I'd practise what I preach if
80 Pacificjourney : First of all they are not MY figures but those collected by THE most respected magazine on the planet. As I clearly pointed out the data refers only t
81 Toda,Reisinger : political, religious, social freedom being inherently unquantifiable. Aha?? Your brain is not even able to understand the difference in the degree of
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