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User currently offlineRJpieces From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2252 times:

I don't recall seeing a thread on this topic in a while, but do any of you have home aquariums? I had a 39 gallon tank for several years when I was younger, but my family got rid of it when I left for college....I've been thinking about getting one now that I am living alone, but have some concerns that I thought some of you who have aquariums might help me address:

First off, the smell. I don't remember this, but my mom claims that our aquarium used to stink up the whole living room, or at least the area where it was located. Now this may be because I stopped taking good care of it in the months before we got rid of it, but I am not sure. Do any of you have problems with the smell?

Second, I used to HATE taking care of the filter. I had one of those 3-part filters, so I had to regularly change three components. Are there good filters out there that only require one component? I don't mind changing the water and whatnot, but the filter used to get so dirty and it was a royal pain to change.

Any insights are appreciated!

31 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineTb727 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1652 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2242 times:

As far as smell, I had a big old Oscar and he was a pig. I had the same problems with stinky, dirty water and it was in my bedroom to top it all off. I bought a Python cleaner and it was awesome. I had to clean that tank just about every week at times but it was so easy with the python since it hooks right up to your faucet. I no longer have my tank set up since that damn fish died a couple years ago, but once I get settled in my new place and get home more than I am now, I want to set it all back up again.

As far as a filter goes, I used an Aquaclear filter by Hagen. It didn't get much easier than that thing, nice and quiet and easy to take care of. I really do miss my aquarium but I don't think my fish would appreciate me being gone for 2 weeks at a time with no one to feed them.



Too lazy to work, too scared to steal!
User currently offlineScrubbsYWG From Canada, joined Mar 2007, 1495 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2237 times:

first, aquariums shouldnt stink if they are taken care of properly. Certain fish are dirtier than others. I had piranhas for years, and i fed them raw chicken. If there was a piece that was left and i didnt catch it for a couple days, then it smelled foul. but generally, it was not noticeable.

as far as filters, well, you shouldnt really change all the filter media at once, meaning if you have three kinds of filter material, you are not supposed to change them all at once. This is a no no because lots of beneficial bacteria lives in the filter and by changing it all, you are messing with the equilibrium your tank has established, and you will get elevated levels chemicals from decomposing food and feces.

All aquariums require maintenance. you have to take care of them for them to be clean, hardy, and for your fish to be healthy.

I am moving into a house shortly, and am debating buying a large tank(125g+) for the house. I just hate how limited you are in the fish you can have with smaller tanks.


User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 3, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2238 times:

Quoting RJpieces (Thread starter):

I dont know if you are talking about fresh or salt water, but I have a 10 gallon freshwater tank with two goldfish. No smell and I rarely have to clean the water. We have a tetra filter that uses these cartridges that you simply drop in, its great. Nothing to take apart. The tetra filters come in a few sizes and I believe the largest can handle 25-40 gallons.


edit for spelling and added info

[Edited 2008-07-11 20:18:18]


Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 4, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2221 times:

Well, I've got 4 aquariums at present. One could say it's my other passion outside of aviation.

First off, aquariums involve work and maintenance, there is no way around it. The work doesn't need to be too much, but it does need to be regular.

I can give you tons of advice, but I'll stick to the basics for now and I can answer more in depth questions if you have any.

Quoting RJpieces (Thread starter):
Do any of you have problems with the smell?

As long as you take care of your aquarium, this means regular water changes (I'd recommend 25% a every week) and take care of your filter, you shouldn't have any smell what so ever.

Quoting RJpieces (Thread starter):
Second, I used to HATE taking care of the filter. I had one of those 3-part filters, so I had to regularly change three components. Are there good filters out there that only require one component? I don't mind changing the water and whatnot, but the filter used to get so dirty and it was a royal pain to change.

Keeping your filter maintained is a must. Aquariums require work, there is no way around it. A good filter needs at least three parts to it, other wise it just doesn't do what its supposed to do which is keep your fish healthy. The three stages of filtration are mechanical (sponge) which is necessary to block all the main and large debris from re-entering the tank. Chemical (carbon, peat, ammonia block) keeps impurities and toxins out of the water. And biological (biolballs, biowheel, ceramic rings) is necessary to host the aerobic bacteria necessary to reduce the harmful ammonia and nitrites (toxic to fish) into less harmful nitrates. This is all part of the nitrogen cycle.

If you want a good and affordable filter, I'd suggest an AquaClear filter. They are a HOB (Hang On Back) filter that simply hangs on the back of your aquarium. They have a sponge, a carbon pack and ceramic rings. They are very easy to customize with other types of media as well if you need to.

Also, always over filter your tank. Most filters on the market only filter the very bare minimum required to keep a tank healthy. The easiest rule of thumb to to "double up". What this means, you find a filter, look at its max rating and divide it by half. As an example, a filter rated for a 50g tank should only be used (on its own) for a 25g tank. So, if you have a 50g tank, you'd need two of those filters or one thats rated for a 100g tank. Of course, as with every rule of thumbs, there are always exceptions.

As far as maintenance goes, you do need to do a partial water change (I do 25%) once a week and rinse your filter parts about once a month. Of course, depending on your fish, you may have to do it more often. However, its not hard work at all, it should only take you maybe 15 minutes to half an hour a week depending on your tank size.

The best piece of advice I can give you is to do research! Figure out what kind of tank you want. What kind of fish you want. How to cycle your tank. What is the required equipment you need. What is the best equipment on the market. What is a good water conditioner.

I don't want to bore you to much, so I'll just keep it at that. However, feel free to throw as many questions you need to at me, I'll be more than happy to answer them and help you out best I can.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineScrubbsYWG From Canada, joined Mar 2007, 1495 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2219 times:



Quoting ACDC8 (Reply 4):
Chemical (carbon, peat, ammonia block) keeps impurities and toxins out of the water.

After i started aquariums up, i never really ran carbon or any other chemical filtration in my filters. The only time i really used carbon on established aquariums was when i was getting rid of medicine or if i wanted to keep the water from getting the brown/yellow tinge that comes with driftwood or peat. I dont mean to start a debate on this, as i have not had a tank set up for a couple years, but when i was really into fishkeeping, i did a lot of reading and lots of people do not run carbon. For beginners, it is probably safer to use carbon, though.


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 6, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2213 times:



Quoting ScrubbsYWG (Reply 5):
After i started aquariums up, i never really ran carbon or any other chemical filtration in my filters. The only time i really used carbon on established aquariums was when i was getting rid of medicine or if i wanted to keep the water from getting the brown/yellow tinge that comes with driftwood or peat. I dont mean to start a debate on this, as i have not had a tank set up for a couple years, but when i was really into fishkeeping, i did a lot of reading and lots of people do not run carbon. For beginners, it is probably safer to use carbon, though.

Ah yes, the great carbon debate!

I was going to post on that, but I'm way to exhausted tonight. But you are correct, there are many aquarists who will strongly recommend taking the carbon out since it has been suggested that it can even cause diseases in fish, especially Hole In The Head disease to HITH prone fishes such as Oscars.

Personally, I'm still undecided on the matter. I've used carbon in my tanks and have never had an issue with it yet. And it doesn't matter what you read, you'll always find an article that recommends the opposite to the article you just read. So to use it or not? I couldn't say for sure.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlinePlaneWasted From Sweden, joined Jan 2008, 540 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2213 times:

I have a 3 gal tank, is it too small to be used at all?

When I used it as a kid it was very easy to maintain i remember..


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 8, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2211 times:



Quoting PlaneWasted (Reply 7):
I have a 3 gal tank, is it too small to be used at all?

Not if you use it properly and be very smart with the type of fish you can keep in it.

If you really wanna have some fun, google up Picoreef and see what you can do with a 3g tank ... Big grin



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlinePC12Fan From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2468 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 2180 times:

I've had aquariums off and on my entire life and I do enjoy them very much. I have a 55 gallon and have had very good sucess utilizing both an undergravel and water filter. As has been stated, don't get a water filter to match the tanks capacity. Get something that will do the job and then some. As far as water changes, I personally don't do them as much as most say. A lot of this has to do with the type and size of the aquarium. Salt water tanks are superior when it comes to the beauty of the fish, but they are very high maintenance. Water changes are pretty much the equivalent of life support. With freshwater, you can get away with not doing them too much. In my case, I add water as it evaporates, and maybe every two two three months is when I do a bonafide change.

Do research, go to pet stores and ask questions, and ask any friends that may have fish tanks for advice. Different fish have different needs. I personally am a Tetra fan because you can get a lot of fish in a tank. The rule of thumb is to allow one inch of fish per gallon of water. Knowledge is the best thing to have on this subject.

Good luck!



Just when I think you've said the stupidest thing ever, you keep talkin'!
User currently offlineBeaucaire From Syria, joined Sep 2003, 5252 posts, RR: 24
Reply 10, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2172 times:

I used to have a 250 liter aquarium ( sweetwater ) but used undergravel-filter and many,many plants.
To obtain a great ecological balance in a tank,you absolutely need few fish and many plants- first of all it looks better,it's good for the fish-they like to hide in the plants - it produces oxygene and the plants act as natural filter,absorbing waste that sinks into the gravel.
In my 250 liter tank I only had about 15-20 relatively small fish ( some Neon's,two glass-cleaner fish,some Skalar's and a couple of Macropodus opercularis.)

My preference -if I ever would start having captive animals again- would nevertheless be a couple of those little beauties :

http://img367.imageshack.us/img367/8494/imagesfrog005abluedartfiy9.jpg

Blue dart-frogs (in nature they are poisonous but not in captivity )
They are quite small but look incredibly nice in a rain-forest tank.
They would need a rainforest terrarium of about 200 -300 liters and plenty of exotic plants (bromelia) plus a humidifier.



Please respect animals - don't eat them...
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8468 posts, RR: 10
Reply 11, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2166 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting Beaucaire (Reply 10):
in nature they are poisonous

Then in nature don't eat them!



After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 12, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2166 times:



Quoting PC12Fan (Reply 9):
With freshwater, you can get away with not doing them too much. In my case, I add water as it evaporates, and maybe every two two three months is when I do a bonafide change.

Tahts about my system, evey couple of weeks, 44oz's of water (one of those giant pepsi cups from the movie theatre) and every month-two months is a 1/3-1/2 water change.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineRJpieces From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2115 times:

Thanks for the replies, everyone.

Quoting ScrubbsYWG (Reply 2):
as far as filters, well, you shouldnt really change all the filter media at once, meaning if you have three kinds of filter material, you are not supposed to change them all at once. This is a no no because lots of beneficial bacteria lives in the filter and by changing it all, you are messing with the equilibrium your tank has established, and you will get elevated levels chemicals from decomposing food and feces.

Yeah, I'm aware of that..This was one of the difficulties I ran into with my earlier tank. Because I would essentially be changing one part of the filter every week, and frankly, it was quite annoying to have to lift the filter catrtridge up and out, to a table or somewhere (the whole time which it is dripping water), and then to replace the 1 of 3 cartridges....Are there no filters that make this easier, or is it just unavoidable?

Quoting ACDC8 (Reply 4):
. A good filter needs at least three parts to it

What about those undergravel filters? Are those good?

Quoting ACDC8 (Reply 4):
As far as maintenance goes, you do need to do a partial water change (I do 25%) once a week and rinse your filter parts about once a month.

Besides that and obviously changing the filter, what other stuff do you do? Do you use products such as Tetra's AquaSafe, etc?

Quoting PC12Fan (Reply 9):
I personally am a Tetra fan because you can get a lot of fish in a tank. The rule of thumb is to allow one inch of fish per gallon of water.

Yeah, my old tank was all Tetras too. When I first started, I made the mistake of putting a tinfoil barb in there, which promptly ate a few of the tiny neon tetras. After that, it was 100% tetras plus some catfish and an algae eater. Anyhow, is that rule of thumb widely accepted? I had a 39-gallon tank, and at its peak it definitely had more than 39 fish (on average, one inch each).


User currently offlineSafetyDemo From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2110 times:

The entire balance of your aquarium, as I understand, is based on the Nitrogen Cycle. The more fish you add to the aquarium, the more conscious you need to be with how it affects your cycle.

One inch of fish per gallon is a very useful and safe ratio based on the ability of your tank to support (through filtration, etc) a healthy balance within the Nitrogen Cycle. When you start to exceed that, without proper filtration and aeration - certain harmful chemicals begin to build up in your water and begins to stress your fish. This leads to disease and eventually death.

Check out http://www.fishlore.com

When I started up my last aquarium I found a WEALTH of information there.

PS - I prefer Mollies. They have such personality!

-safetyDemo



Please direct your attention to the flight attendants in the cabin...
User currently offlinePC12Fan From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2468 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2092 times:



Quoting RJpieces (Reply 13):

I always have been a Tetra fan. One of my favorite tanks was a 20 gallon with nothing but neon. Deco was just one pretty large white rock (tall) on the left, a bushy plant on the right with a small accent plant in between in the front on black gravel. Background was a royal blue made up of that foil stuff which we krinkled up first then installed.

Like I said, I have the 55 now, but I was able to get a tetra that I have been after for years and it just suddenly popped up at of all places a local PetSmart. I got two pairs of White finned Rosy Tetras. http://www.aqua-fish.net/show.php?h=rosytetra Photo shows pretty close to what mine look like. One thing I have learned though is the darker the tank, the more vivid the colors they show.



Just when I think you've said the stupidest thing ever, you keep talkin'!
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2082 times:

I'm surprised about all the people complaining about smelly aquariums. I've had the same 10 gallon one for 15 years and it has never smelled (ok yes, it does smell with your nose 1" from the water, otherwise no). I only empty the whole thing every other year, otherwise all I do is replace evaporated water and feed the fish. I use purified water since tap water here is very hard, my fish are pretty happy with how I maintain them, and my longest lived one was an 8 year old silver dollar.

I think a lot of it has to do with the filter I use. I use a Marineland Penguin filter with activated carbon cartdridges. It's completely silent and very efficient. No need to have an aerator either.

http://www.marineland.com/sites/Mari...ail.aspx?id=2054&cid=2006&mid=3226


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 17, posted (6 years 5 months 2 weeks ago) and read 2065 times:



Quoting RJpieces (Reply 13):
Yeah, I'm aware of that..This was one of the difficulties I ran into with my earlier tank. Because I would essentially be changing one part of the filter every week, and frankly, it was quite annoying to have to lift the filter catrtridge up and out, to a table or somewhere (the whole time which it is dripping water), and then to replace the 1 of 3 cartridges....Are there no filters that make this easier, or is it just unavoidable?

Its more or less unavoidable, things need to be cleaned and there are various stages to a filter. Most HOB filters such as Whisper, Tetra or AquaTec use cartridges that slide into place, this combines the mechanical and chemical parts into one cartridge and the biological part as its own cartridge. However, for that fact alone, I wouldn't buy them. They just don't work nearly as well as a filter that has 3 (or more) separate media stages. Don't forget, an aquarium is a living biotope with living creatures in it. Personally, I'd take an extra couple of minutes a week and not worry about having a third or even fourth and fifth part to a filter that needs to be maintained. Once you start getting into the habit, you'll find little ways to make things easier and go quicker.

When I clean my tank and filters, this is what I do ....

-Get my glass scrapper and clean the glass to reduce the amount of algae build up.
-Unplug all equipment (filter, heater, lights).
-Take out any thing that seems to have an undesired algae build up and scrub it off.
-Grab my gravel vacuum and bucket and start to siphon out old water while cleaning the gravel.
-Take the filter media out and throw it in the bucket with aquarium water. Simple rinse and squeeze the sponge till its moderately cleaned and just swish the ceramic rings/bioballs around til they don't have any more build up on them. The carbon (if you're using it) needs to be replaced every month, so it can get tossed and replaced with a new one. I find though, if you actually do this every week, it goes a lot quicker then if you do it only once a month because the crap doesn't have time to build up.
-Put anything I've taken out back in and put the filter back together.
-Dump the old water and rinse out the bucket.
-Refill the bucket with fresh tap water. Make sure you use a good tap water conditioner and get the temperature to closely match that of your tank.
-Dump the new water into the tank and some into the filter.
-Plug everything back in and you're good to go.

All in all, it just takes about 15 minutes per tank.

Quoting RJpieces (Reply 13):
Besides that and obviously changing the filter, what other stuff do you do? Do you use products such as Tetra's AquaSafe, etc?

You'll need a good tap water conditioner for sure. These make your tap water safe for the fish by removing any unwanted chemicals, metals, etc. Some claim they have nitrifying bacteria in it to instantly cycle your tank, but this is one of those subjects that is highly debatable. Personally, I highly recommend Seachem's Stability. Conditioners are really the only additives you need unless you're getting into saltwater or plants, etc.

Quoting RJpieces (Reply 13):
Anyhow, is that rule of thumb widely accepted? I had a 39-gallon tank, and at its peak it definitely had more than 39 fish (on average, one inch each).

You'll find with aquariums, all "rule of thumbs" can be broken. For example, a single goldfish should have at least 15g of water to itself even though it's not 15" big. A lot also has to do with what kind of filtration you have (the more the better). Territorial fish such as most African Cichlids need lots of room because of their aggressiveness. One can also plan carefully and overstock a tank (providing you have very good filtration) and divide the tank into bottom, mid and upper swimmers. But the more fish means you really have to keep an eye on your water parameters.

Quoting RJpieces (Reply 13):
What about those undergravel filters? Are those good?

This is another thing that is quite debatable. Some people swear by them, others say throw them out. I'm sure they have their place, but I find that they are much too inefficient. They just don't do a good job. If you have another filter, such as a HOB or canister, they might be OK. They're also quite a pain to clean because you have to take all the gravel out and you'll find alot more crap under them then you would if you just had gravel. Also, if you plan on keeping live plants, they're a big no-no as they don't allow the plants to get the nutrients they need.

Also, a lot of people keep adding additives to try and get their water pH just right. I wouldn't bother. Fish can adjust to less then perfect conditions. If you keep adding additives you'll find thats a constant battle that just causes stress on your fish. There are other additives, depending on what kind of aquarium you have that may be required, such as fertilizers for plants, trace elements for specific fish, etc.

Just for the heck of it, give me a tank size and types of fish you may be interested in and I can come up with a little shopping list for you.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 18, posted (6 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2064 times:

Reading some of the posts in this thread would probably make some of my friends at my fish forum crap their pants .....  Silly

Not to start any arguments here, but ....

Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 16):
I've had the same 10 gallon



Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 16):
and my longest lived one was an 8 year old silver dollar.

A Silver Dollar in a 10g is a no-no. Silver Dollars get to a good 12" and need at least a 55g tank ...
http://www.aquariumlife.net/profiles...haracidae/silver-dollar/100015.asp

Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 16):
I only empty the whole thing every other year, otherwise all I do is replace evaporated water and feed the fish.

Which of course, is also a no-no. I can guarantee your ammonia and other toxin levels were sky high.

Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 3):
but I have a 10 gallon freshwater tank with two goldfish



Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 3):
No smell and I rarely have to clean the water.

Goldfish are considered some of the dirtiest fish available. They require lots of water changes and 2 shouldn't be in a 10g tank.

Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 16):
I use purified water since tap water here is very hard,

As long as it isn't distilled water, you should be ok. Distilled water contains none of the minerals or elements that even tap water has for a good, healthy tank. Personally, I'd recommend using just straight tap water (even if it's very hard) and a good conditioner as opposed to purchased water. If I were breeding, that would be a different story though.

Quoting PC12Fan (Reply 15):
One of my favorite tanks was a 20 gallon with nothing but neon

I've seen a 90g heavily planted tank with about 100 neons in it and it was freakin' amazing! Tetras are great fish and there are so many to choose from.

Wasn't trying to point fingers at anyone, so don't take any offence to my remarks. Just trying to provide some usefull information.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlinePlaneWasted From Sweden, joined Jan 2008, 540 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2057 times:

So what fishes can I have in a 3 gallon tank?

I was thinking of maybe five of these:


And two:


And of course lots of plants.
Is it way to much? What size do I need for these fishes?


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 20, posted (6 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2049 times:



Quoting PlaneWasted (Reply 19):

Neon Tetras (the first picture you provided) are a schooling fish, meaning the are best kept in groups of at least 6 if not more.

A pair of Guppies would be OK for a 3g tank, but I wouldn't put anymore in it except for perhaps a small pair of Kuhli Loaches for the bottom ...

http://www.aquatic-hobbyist.com/prof...freshwater/loaches/kuhliloach.html

Better yet, I'd put in some nice live plants with some Cherry Shrimp and Celestial Pearl Danios ....

http://www.petshrimp.com/redcherryshrimp.html
http://www.fish-as-pets.com/2007/06/celestial-pearl-danio.html

.... but no more then 5 of each and make sure you have the right requirments for the plants you want to keep. Some require more light then others, CO2 injection and fertilizers.

If you want something a little different, you can turn it into a brakish tank (half saltwater, half freshwater) and keep some Bumblebee Gobies ...

http://badmanstropicalfish.com/profiles/profile59.html

... maybe 3 or 4. Just make sure you use marine salt and few plants will thrive in brakish water. Java fern (Microsorum pteropus) would be a good choice.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlinePlaneWasted From Sweden, joined Jan 2008, 540 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (6 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2043 times:

I like the look of neon tetras. But seems like I need a bigger tank then.

Quoting ACDC8 (Reply 20):

Better yet, I'd put in some nice live plants with some Cherry Shrimp and Celestial Pearl Danios ....

Oooh, those look really cool. Just have to find them i Sweden...

A brakish tank is probably to much work for me..

[Edited 2008-07-15 01:23:23]

User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 22, posted (6 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 2019 times:



Quoting PlaneWasted (Reply 21):
I like the look of neon tetras. But seems like I need a bigger tank then.

A 10g with a dozen Neons, some plants, driftwood would look very nice. I'm sure you could find one quite cheap somewhere.

Quoting PlaneWasted (Reply 21):
Oooh, those look really cool. Just have to find them i Sweden...

Here you go, from the worlds largest petstore in Duisburg, Germany ...

http://www.zajac.de/websale7/Krebse-...5f2b7df0d4891b9d6bc1955f0%2fmd5%7d

Sorry, only in German but they do ship within Europe.

I was also thinking that you could also keep 1 snail in there such as an apple snail to help with any algae.

Quoting PlaneWasted (Reply 21):
A brakish tank is probably to much work for me..

Actually, a brackish tank is very easy to maintain, it's not as complex as a true saltwater tank. You do (especially with a small tank) have to keep an eye on the salinity levels as the water evaporates though and just mix the amount of water with marine salt you want to use for a water change a couple of days before using it.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineFLY2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (6 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2006 times:



Quoting ACDC8 (Reply 18):

Which of course, is also a no-no. I can guarantee your ammonia and other toxin levels were sky high.

If that was the case I doubt any of my fish would've lasted over a year.

Or maybe they're mutant freaks of nature.


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7653 posts, RR: 35
Reply 24, posted (6 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2003 times:



Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 23):
If that was the case I doubt any of my fish would've lasted over a year.

Sometimes fish will adapt to higher levels of toxins then what would normally kill them.

If you have an enclosed system such as a fish tank, everytime you feed your fish, what doesn't get eaten falls onto the bottom of the tank and rots. Everytime your fish poops, it falls onto the bottom and rots. Just these two items alone can create enough ammonia and toxins to kill a fish within weeks. Its simple chemistry, and there are no exceptions to this rule. If you don't perform regular water changes, clean the gravel, maintain the filter your toxin levels will rise, that is a simple fact. Now, if your fish survive this constant rise (and then sudden drop when you clean the tank out completely) is another thing altogether. I'm not saying that they can't survive, but it certainly isn't healthy for the fish and does cause unnecessary stress to the fish.

Alot of people seem to forget, fish are living creatures and have needs just like dogs and cats. They're not just a decoration to be put in the corner and forgotten about. Not that I'm saying you or anyone here is like that.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
25 MIAMIx707 : Fresh or Saltwater? I usually collected my own fish when I used to have saltwater aquariums having the ocean relatively close in Florida, which makes
26 Post contains links and images ACDC8 : I have the 29g BioCube. Very nice system, but you are quite limited with lighting if you really want to get into some specific corals that require mo
27 Post contains images PlaneWasted : Ok, I have now decided to start an aquarium again. And YOU are responsible! I think I will go for a 30l (8 gal) tank instead, because then I can buy
28 Post contains images ACDC8 : If you get some of the Danios, send some my way. They're nearly impossible to get around here right now. A local pet store got some in about half a y
29 Post contains links ACDC8 : Here's a couple of great sites you may wanna check out ... http://www.nanotuners.com/ http://www.nano-reef.com/forums/inde...21742ddd7008892f15978&sh
30 MIAMIx707 : Nice killifish ACDC8 I'll probably PM u a question or two at a later date but for now, how many watts did your light setup come with vs what you put i
31 Post contains links ACDC8 : I haven't done any mods to it, I'm going to keep it stock and maybe just set up another reef tank eventually and then go nuts with equipment. But the
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