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Texas Investing Heavily In Wind Power  
User currently offlineTexan From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 4284 posts, RR: 52
Posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1434 times:

Texas Approves $4.93 billion for wind power related projects

By 2013, Texas will have both the transmission lines and the wind generators to provide over 3.5 million residents with wind power, even on the hottest of days. Boone Pickens, a big time oil guy, is also highly invested in wind power and plans to build additional transmission lines for his own project, which is scheduled to come online in 2011. Pickens, by the way, is also buying up most of the land and water rights to the West Texas Auquifer in anticipation of the rising cost of water.

In 2013, though, Texas, if you include both the private and public transmission lines, should have the same amount of wind generated power as Germany (between 18,500 and 25,000 megawatts, depending on the size of Boone Pickens' project).

Texan


"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineHT From Germany, joined May 2005, 6525 posts, RR: 23
Reply 1, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1420 times:

Good news, even though the articles mentions that there is significant under-capacity to transport all that energy across the state - and it speculates that this will increase as turbines can (will) be installed faster than the power lines can be built (technically and politically).

Quoting Texan (Thread starter):
In 2013, though, Texas, if you include both the private and public transmission lines, should have the same amount of wind generated power as Germany (between 18,500 and 25,000 megawatts,

This is compared to the currently installed capacity in Germany at 22,247 MW in 2007, but plans have been approved for numerous off-shore wind parks to be built in the North Sea in the coming years adding another 28,000 MW, IIRC (I cannot find the source at present).
Older turbines ashore regularly get replaced by more powerful ones ("repowering"), bringing up capacity even further.

But one problem remains: If there is no wind, no electricity will be available - and for those cases there will have to be backup-power stations be maintained & held ready (being able to fire up within hours according to wind predictions).
Putting wind turbines offshore should decrease this problem a bit, as there usually always is enough wind to power these.
-HT



Carpe diem ! Life is too short to waste your time ! Keep in mind, that today is the first day of the rest of your life !
User currently offlineTexan From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 4284 posts, RR: 52
Reply 2, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1411 times:



Quoting HT (Reply 1):
Good news, even though the articles mentions that there is significant under-capacity to transport all that energy across the state - and it speculates that this will increase as turbines can (will) be installed faster than the power lines can be built (technically and politically).

True, which is Boone Pickens' reasoning for building his own transmission lines. He owns a tremendous amount of land in the Texas Panhandle that he wants to turn into a giant wind farm (and, eventually, suck the West Texas Aquifer dry by pumping and selling the water). Texas can only get the transmission lines installed by 2013. Pickens can get them installed more quickly.

Quoting HT (Reply 1):
This is compared to the currently installed capacity in Germany at 22,247 MW in 2007, but plans have been approved for numerous off-shore wind parks to be built in the North Sea in the coming years adding another 28,000 MW, IIRC (I cannot find the source at present).

True, but the other question is how much will Pickens' lines be able to transmit. His plans call for his wind farm to produce nearly the entire amount of megawatts that Texas will be able to handle on the new lines. If his transmission lines double the capacity...

Right now it is an open question, though, you are right.

Quoting HT (Reply 1):
But one problem remains: If there is no wind, no electricity will be available

Very true. However, the Panhandle and the areas out in West Texas, especially near the passes out in the mountains, are consistently windy year round. That is the entire reason West Texas is seeing the wind power development and not East Texas. It would be much easier and cheaper to install transmission lines from ares of East Texas to the major cities, but the wind just is not there.

West Texas has been called by various people, of late former candidate for governor Kinky Friedman, the Saudi Arabia of renewable energy. I'm just glad to see we are finally tapping into it and realizing its potential. The goals, other than decreased pollution and increased energy efficiency, include technological improvements to better harness the wind power; and the creation of thousands of new construction and manufacturing jobs, especially in West Texas. Again, we don't know if these goals will come to fruition, but it sure is about time we took the chance!

Texan



"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14130 posts, RR: 62
Reply 3, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1409 times:



Quoting HT (Reply 1):
But one problem remains: If there is no wind, no electricity will be available - and for those cases there will have to be backup-power stations be maintained & held ready (being able to fire up within hours according to wind predictions).

A few months ago I watched an interesting report about a new type of rechargeable redox flow battery being developed in Italy.
Basically you let two different liquid chemicals get pumped into an electrolytic reaction chamber, where they produce electric current (in a way similar to a fuel cell). The amount of energy which can be stored is only limited by the size of the tanks for the chemicals and the reaction products.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_battery
The nice thing is that the reaction is reversible.
The whole system is still in the development phase (out of the lab, but the developersare in progress tweaking the system for increased efficiency), but will probably be available in a few years.

Systems like this could store the excessive energy production e.g. of high wind seasons or periods of high solar energy production, to be used during times of lower production.

They might also have a future in driving electric cars. Up to now conventional rechargeable batteries take hours to recharge, while a flow battery can be simply recharged by pumping fresh chemicals into the storage tank, while removing the reaction product, a matter of minutes.

Jan


User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1396 times:

Hey Guys....

Isn't Boone Pickins originally from OK? Or Resides here? I know that OSU stadium is named after him. Anyway, besides the point.

Windfarms are going up here in Oklahoma as well, as welll they should, we get enough damn wind here to power the entire region. Constantly on I-35 I see trucks hauling the windmill blades northward. Talk about fan diameter, just one of those blades looks to be like 70-100 ft long! (Probably exaggerating), but they are HUGE. We already have the alternative to use wind power here in OK through OG&E though from what I hear it doesn't really save you much money, but I'm sure that's not the point, but that it's environmentally friendly. Which I'm totally for.

What's great about wind energy is that farmers or whoever owns the land can still use that land for cattle and agriculture because the footprint of the wind towers isn't that much.


UAL


User currently offlineHT From Germany, joined May 2005, 6525 posts, RR: 23
Reply 5, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1395 times:



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 3):
Systems like this could store the excessive energy production e.g. of high wind seasons or periods of high solar energy production, to be used during times of lower production.

Interesting concept.
Putting these redox flow batteries rather close to the point of electricity generation (i.e. close to the wind farm or solar farm) would also mean a more continuous use of the power lines (in contrast to putting these batteries close to the end consumer), which are under increasing stress here in Germany where in increasing numbers electricity needs to be directed from the Northwest (ashore and later offshore) to consumers located south.
-HT



Carpe diem ! Life is too short to waste your time ! Keep in mind, that today is the first day of the rest of your life !
User currently offlineTexan From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 4284 posts, RR: 52
Reply 6, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1393 times:



Quoting UAL747 (Reply 4):
Isn't Boone Pickins originally from OK? Or Resides here? I know that OSU stadium is named after him. Anyway, besides the point.

Pickens was born in Oklahoma and grew up in Oklahoma and Amarillo. He attended OSU and donates hundreds of millions of dollars to the school (over $400 million so far).

Texan



"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
User currently offlineSTLGph From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 9500 posts, RR: 26
Reply 7, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 1368 times:



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 3):

also ... systems are being developed for the turbines to pump air into ground aquifers. when there is a slow wind day, the air is let out .. flowing through turbines and producing energy.



if assumptions could fly, airliners.net would be the world's busiest airport
User currently offlineHT From Germany, joined May 2005, 6525 posts, RR: 23
Reply 8, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1359 times:



Quoting UAL747 (Reply 4):
Talk about fan diameter, just one of those blades looks to be like 70-100 ft long! (Probably exaggerating), but they are HUGE.

Quite likely. The windmills to be installed off the German coast (no, This is not the German Coast Guard. **) ), have a rotor diameter of 116 metres which is about 380 ft.


**):



Carpe diem ! Life is too short to waste your time ! Keep in mind, that today is the first day of the rest of your life !
User currently offlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5741 posts, RR: 19
Reply 9, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 1347 times:



Quoting Texan (Thread starter):
should have the same amount of wind generated power as Germany (between 18,500 and 25,000 megawatts

Please don't confuse "installed output" with "generated output" because especially in case of wind power plants the latter is a mere fraction of the former.
Plus you need something like 0.7 MWe of output fitted in conventional power plants as a back-up for each 1 MWe of installed output in windmills. Without it you are asking for a big trouble with stability of the grid.


User currently offlineTexan From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 4284 posts, RR: 52
Reply 10, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 1341 times:



Quoting L410Turbolet (Reply 9):
Please don't confuse "installed output" with "generated output" because especially in case of wind power plants the latter is a mere fraction of the former.

I know they are very different animals. The installed output is projected, with Pickens' lines included, to be around 20,000-25,000 megawatts. Pickens thinks he can generate enough power to max out all those lines by himself and do so by 2013.

Texan



"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
User currently offlineSuper80DFW From United States of America, joined Oct 2007, 1696 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1284 times:

I believe that T. Boone Pickens' windfarm is being built near Pampa, Texas. Another good place for windfarms is in Southeast Colorado. There is already a HUGE windfarm south of Lamar, Colorado, but there is lots of potential for more wind power around there too.


"Things change, friends leave, life doesn't stop for anybody." -- EAT'EM UP EAT'EM UP KSU!!
User currently offlineAndrewUber From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2528 posts, RR: 40
Reply 12, posted (6 years 4 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1264 times:

I'm glad to see Texas is finally becoming more aware of the envrionment. I've seen scary statistics about how Texas has the highest carbon emissions of any U.S. state.

While driving from Phoenix to Dallas this spring I took some photos of the amazing wind power in Sweetwater, TX. The sheer size and mass of these machines is incredible. The noise they make is minimal considering the size. I believe these fans have 115 foot blades:

http://drew.charliej.net/albums/userpics/10002/Past_and_present.jpg

http://drew.charliej.net/albums/userpics/10002/Generator.jpg

Drew  wave 



I'd rather shoot BAD_MOTIVE
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