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Women Taking Hyphenated Names When Married  
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3631 times:

I feel like I'm starting to sound like Andy Rooney tonight: but why do women do that? To me, it's always bothered me-almost like woman do that so when they get divorced, they still have their original last name there.

I guess I'm old-fashioned, but that's one I can't stand.

92 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineScarletHarlot From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 4673 posts, RR: 56
Reply 1, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3624 times:

Legally, I have three names, but at work and in many other situations, I hyphenate.

Here's how I can best explain it:

My maiden name was Scarlet O'Hara.
My husband's name is Mr. Harlot.
My legal name is now Scarlet O'Hara Harlot.
To make it clear, I often use Scarlet O'Hara-Harlot.

My maiden name is also a first name, so if I do not hyphenate, people think I have two first names.

But bottom line, I am an O'Hara, regardless of who I marry, and I choose to acknowledge and honour that by using all three of my names. I am an only child and my dad died a year after I got married. It honours him to use my family name as well as my husband's.



But that was when I ruled the world
User currently offlineShyFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3617 times:



Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):
almost like woman do that so when they get divorced, they still have their original last name there.

I've never thought of it like that. I've always seen it as sort of a status symbol. Kinda like saying "I'm hip, I'm trendy" sort of thing.

Perhaps I'm just too cynical.


User currently offlineScarletHarlot From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 4673 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3619 times:



Quoting ShyFlyer (Reply 2):
Perhaps I'm just too cynical.

Both of you are.

I had my own identity and my own family name before I was married. Why should I give that up? At the same time, it was important to Mr. Harlot for me to take his name. This way, I can have both.



But that was when I ruled the world
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26426 posts, RR: 75
Reply 4, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3617 times:

I completely understand why women do this. By and large, it is women who have established themselves under a certain name and want to keep that name while adding that of their husband. Women like Misty May (now May-Treanor) are known under one name and their careers are built from that.

Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):
I feel like I'm starting to sound like Andy Rooney tonight

I think your eyebrows just doubled in size

[Edited 2008-07-21 17:10:27]


Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineKmh1956 From Bermuda, joined Jun 2005, 3324 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3612 times:

It may also possibly be because many women fear that by using their husband's name ONLY that they're losing part of their own identity. Like instead of being, for example, Mary Smith, they're now "Joe Smith's wife" and nothing else. I can understand it, to a degree.


'Somebody tell me why I'm on my own if there's a soulmate for everyone' :Natasha Bedingfield
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3604 times:



Quoting N1120A (Reply 4):
I think your eyebrows just doubles in size

I do have to trim them quite often, to be honest.  rotfl 


User currently offlinePSA53 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3059 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3601 times:

Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 3):
Quoting ShyFlyer (Reply 2):
Perhaps I'm just too cynical.

Both of you are.

I had my own identity and my own family name before I was married. Why should I give that up? At the same time, it was important to Mr. Harlot for me to take his name. This way, I can have both.

I agree with that.Why not?Two ladies,I know, kept there maiden names in a hyphenated form.When they got married,one said it was easier to achieve financial freedom and not go through all the ID documentation changes right away.

[Edited 2008-07-21 17:10:49]


Tuesday's Off! Do not disturb.
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3591 times:

I just find it kind of uppity, and that's no disrespect to Scarlot. I just am a traditionalist when it comes to that.

On another rant, there was a woman who used to work with me here She was married, but she told me she and her husband didn't share checking accounts, savings accounts. They didn't even take vacations together. I asked her if she was just preparing for when she got a divorce.  Smile


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26426 posts, RR: 75
Reply 9, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3587 times:



Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 8):
I just find it kind of uppity, and that's no disrespect to Scarlot. I just am a traditionalist when it comes to that.

Uppity? That doesn't sound very nice, now does it? I mean, I don't think you are implying that women should be relegated to the roles they served in the 1950s?



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineShyFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3586 times:



Quoting Kmh1956 (Reply 5):
because many women fear that by using their husband's name ONLY that they're losing part of their own identity.

Good point. If my wife felt that way, I'd be cool with her keeping her name and not taking mine. Hell, I'd even consider taking hers.


User currently offlineKent350787 From Australia, joined May 2008, 964 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3584 times:

My wife kept her name - why shouldn't she?  Smile

We didn't hyphenate our sons' names - they have my name, but their mother's surname as one of their two middle names. If we'd had girls, we were planning on them having their mother's last name.....

Kent


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26426 posts, RR: 75
Reply 12, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3577 times:



Quoting ShyFlyer (Reply 10):

Good point. If my wife felt that way, I'd be cool with her keeping her name and not taking mine. Hell, I'd even consider taking hers.

Actually, my friends did something like this. When they got married, they both changed their last names to her name - his name



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3579 times:



Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 3):
At the same time, it was important to Mr. Harlot for me to take his name

What about him taking your name? It seems just as important to you as it was to him, all traditions aside.

Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 3):
This way, I can have both.

So could Mr. Harlot. He could be Mr. Harlot-O'Hara.

You could have done what we did. It was important to both of us, but we didn't want to hyphenate, so we did the next best thing. We flipped a coin.



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineAirStairs From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 487 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3563 times:

It is sometimes for practical purposes: my mother uses her maiden name (which she calls her "professional") name when she uses the title Dr. or acts in that capacity, and my father's family name everywhere else. But holds credit cards, business licenses under both.



AirStairs


User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3539 times:

I also see quite a few couples come through the airport where the wife doesn't even take the husband's name. Now, that, to me, is just out of the question.

My wife didn't even think twice about not using her maiden name, so I just don't understand either, I guess.


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26426 posts, RR: 75
Reply 16, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3534 times:



Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 15):
I also see quite a few couples come through the airport where the wife doesn't even take the husband's name. Now, that, to me, is just out of the question.

So, the woman should take the man's name, no exceptions?

Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 15):

My wife didn't even think twice about not using her maiden name, so I just don't understand either, I guess.

You two were also very young when you got together.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 17, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3532 times:

Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):
I feel like I'm starting to sound like Andy Rooney tonight: but why do women do that?

In my mom's case it was the first of several pissing matches with my dad (her now ex-husband) and, in general, the world.

Essentially, as I remember the story, she was fine with her last name (King), and had no interest in taking my dad's last name (Cliby)... the settlement was essentially to meet half way with the hyphen, and to name me Lincoln and hyphenate my last name. Seriously.

See, as part of the argument my dad is storied to have yelled "If my parents did that I would be John xxx-yyy-Lincoln-Cliby". My mom liked the sound of Lincoln, and...

So fast forward 14-ish years, and the divorce is final... my mom is back to King, and I'm the only King-Cliby on the planet.

So here I am Lincoln John King-Cliby [Lincoln = Dad's mother's maiden name, John = Dad's first name, family tradition that the first son takes father's name as middle name, King = Mother's maiden name, Cliby= Dad's surname]

Unless I'm traveling on an airline, where I'm KINGCLIBY/LINCOLN, KINGCLIBY/LINCOLNJ, or perhaps KINGCLIBY/LINCOLNJMR since airline reservation systems don't support the hyphen as a character in a name field (I understand that SABRE uses the - to indicate the beginning of a name field, not sure about other systems)

It also makes it incredibly easy to tell when I have a telemarketer on the phone... And I'm usually pissed when my last name gets abbreviated... my last name is King-Cliby, not King, not Cliby. If you must Kingcliby, but never just half, Thank you Very Much.


Funny story, though: At my last job I was friends with the Telephone Services folks (we were under the same Dean). When they finally got around to changing the caller ID for my phone from "VACANT OFFICE" it showed up as "8655 KING LINCOLN" -- I got a kick out of that, especially since the 'standard' would have been "8655 KING-CLIBY,LINC"  Smile

Lincoln

[Edited 2008-07-21 18:15:28]


CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3518 times:



Quoting N1120A (Reply 16):
You two were also very young when you got together.

If you want to call 26 "young". We weren't kids. But we come from very traditional families, and, in those families, the woman takes the man's last name.


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26426 posts, RR: 75
Reply 19, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3511 times:



Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 18):
But we come from very traditional families, and, in those families, the woman takes the man's last name.

Hey, I come from a "Traditional" family as well. My mother and father are still married and she took his last name, despite it being rather complex compared to hers. That said, I don't have a problem with people doing what they want with their names.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineKent350787 From Australia, joined May 2008, 964 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3506 times:



Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 15):
I also see quite a few couples come through the airport where the wife doesn't even take the husband's name. Now, that, to me, is just out of the question.

My wife didn't even think twice about not using her maiden name, so I just don't understand either, I guess.

A cultural thing perhaps - I find it difficult to understand your lack of understanding.  Smile

My wife has 2 degrees and a postgrad qual in her own name (but 2 since we married), and is in a very senior role, so why wouldn't she want to keep her name. But the name change or otherwise was always her choice, and she is strongly against the sense of "ownership" or "subjugation" it can suggest.

Kent


User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13549 posts, RR: 62
Reply 21, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3489 times:
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Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 3):
I had my own identity and my own family name before I was married. Why should I give that up? At the same time, it was important to Mr. Harlot for me to take his name. This way, I can have both.

Thing is, as 50's and "archaic" as it may sound to some, to many men it's important that their wife take their name and leave their maiden name behind. A former girlfriend of mine (who I'd seriously discussed marriage with at one point) was very adamant about keeping her maiden name as a show of respect to her father. I understood that, but at the same time it made me feel as if I'd always come second to her father.

Disagree if you wish - people are certainly entitled to their own opinions on this - but to many, the tradition of taking the husband's name and no longer using the maiden name is a sign of honoring the husband and his family.

Thankfully, when I finally did meet the girl I chose to spend the rest of my life with, this was a tradition she was in favor of, and she gladly took my last name. Not that it'd have been a deal-breaker for us getting married, but even before that conversation with my ex many years earlier I'd always found the insistence on a hyphenated name to be somewhat obnoxious.

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 17):
(I understand that SABRE uses the - to indicate the beginning of a name field, not sure about other systems)

The dash is just the "name key," used in both SABRE and SystemOne (or whatever SystemOne is being called these days). An agent entering your name when building your PNR would type:

-KINGCLIBY/LINCOLNJMR

And then hit enter. The dash wouldn't show in the PNR itself; it's just the way it's entered.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3488 times:



Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 21):
KINGCLIBY/LINCOLNJMR

Sounds like a big-time law firm to me.  Big grin


User currently offlineScarletHarlot From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 4673 posts, RR: 56
Reply 23, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3475 times:



Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 13):
What about him taking your name? It seems just as important to you as it was to him, all traditions aside.

Good question. He is more traditional than me, and this is not an option that he would be comfortable with. He is also a different ethnicity than me, and while it amuses me to 'wear' a last name that is clearly not my ethnicity, his last name fits him very well. His last name is also extremely rare, so it's kind of cool to have such an unusual name.

I actually am closer to his family than mine, so I'm proud to have their name. At the same time, I'm also proud of my family name. It's a good Newfoundlander name.

It's worked out well for us, and I'm satisfied with my unpronounceable, unspellable hyphenated name.  Smile

Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 15):
I also see quite a few couples come through the airport where the wife doesn't even take the husband's name. Now, that, to me, is just out of the question.

Fortunately, Falcon, it takes all kinds.  Smile If my husband absolutely insisted that I had to drop my maiden name and take his name, or was not comfortable with my hyphenation, I would know that he is not the man for me.

Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 13):
You could have done what we did. It was important to both of us, but we didn't want to hyphenate, so we did the next best thing. We flipped a coin.

I think it's totally cool that together you decided on the family name for the two of you.



But that was when I ruled the world
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9911 posts, RR: 26
Reply 24, posted (6 years 1 month 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3461 times:
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Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 3):

Quoting ShyFlyer (Reply 2):
Perhaps I'm just too cynical.

Both of you are.

 checkmark 

Quoting Falcon84 (Reply 15):
I also see quite a few couples come through the airport where the wife doesn't even take the husband's name. Now, that, to me, is just out of the question.

I am Indian by ethnicity. My dad has an American (white) wife. My older brother has an American (white) wife. Both of their wives kept their maiden names.

Most people in the US can't pronounce my last name, even after I pronounce it for them multiple times. Nothing wrong with that - it doesn't bother me at all - but I'd never force my last name on my wife.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
25 STLGph : that's just one of those names that makes me look at it and go "are you serious?"
26 EA CO AS : See, now there's what ticks me off - if you don't like the tradition, fine. But why do people have to make it into something ugly by suggesting it's
27 Kent350787 : Disagree with a modern feminist interpretation if you like, but remember traditions come from somewhere - and history is filled with the subjugation
28 ScarletHarlot : That may not be what it means to you or to most modern men, but that was the original reason for the wife taking the husband's name. Now, one thing I
29 Falcon84 : On that, we agree, Scarlet. My wife's name is Karen. She doesn't use my first name for anything, except to scold me.
30 JCS17 : I don't know if marrying someone who insists on hyphenating their last name is the best idea. I think a total of eight of my male cousins are married,
31 AirStairs : If my last name were Udvar-Hazy, I'd be okay with the hyphen.
32 EWRCabincrew : What of your commitment to her and take her name? Either way, you are showing commitment, getting married and showing the world you are a family.
33 Andz : That is traditional and is in fact correct English usage. Hyphenated names have become the rage here among public figures. Many are people who didn't
34 Vikkyvik : No. But it's not really that difficult to show commitment to a marriage despite last names, too. So...
35 Pyrex : You know what I can't stand? People who insist on taking the last names of their husbands/captors/whatever. I'm a guy and if my fiancee insisted in t
36 Vikkyvik : Let me point out - you're arguing against someone being closed-minded....but you're being closed-minded yourself. Just because someone wants to take
37 Pyrex : I have a philosophy in life - if when engaging in a meaningful debate you justify your point with a) tradition or b) religion then you are out of arg
38 EA CO AS : Correction - it WAS. And not only does it no longer hold any such meaning, it hasn't for centuries. Case in point - if you're married and your wife h
39 Falcon84 : Exactly. Although there are still more than a few idiots out there who think that woman should walk to their left and two steps behind in this cultur
40 Kent350787 : And let's agree to disagree there - history would tell us that the changing of the name was the "marital power trip", however people may view it thes
41 MD11Engineer : When my girlfriend and I get married, she will keep her name as well. So now she is Maria Sanchez Catubay, with Sanchez being her mother's maiden name
42 Pyrex : Hm, no she doesn't. She loses at least half her identity (her mother's name).
43 Zkpilot : I don't mind if women use a hyphenated name, but what gets me is when they get the kids to take on that name also... So the kid "Joe Michael Smith-Blo
44 EA CO AS : Yeah, stir that pot! If he and his girlfriend are okay with this, why do you have to piss all over it by pointing out your perceived problems with wh
45 Cragley : I think whatever is fine, I just feel sorry for kids with 2 surnames. Like John Wilson-Smith. They get teased with names like 'two dads'
46 MD-90 : That is traditional and correct English and whatever but I've never liked that either. Reading it gives the impression that the woman in the relation
47 Scbriml : What if it was equally important for you to keep yours? It's good that you're comfortable where you ended up, but IMHO, you have as much, if not more
48 Cgnnrw : I have no problem when a woman retains her maiden name. Good for her. I have no problem when she takes her husband's name. Good for her. I have no pro
49 Lincoln : Yeah, that is a thought thas has crossed my mind; I guess that bridge will get crossed when the time comes, but it doesn't seem like an insurmountabl
50 Andz : That brings to mind another topic altogether.... German qualifications as part of the name. Such as: Prof. Dr. Dr. rer nat. Dr. Ing. Klaus von Schmit
51 ScarletHarlot : Many people are non-traditional in their marriage but that does not mean that they are any less committed to their partner and shared family. We ofte
52 DesertJets : Ultimately who takes what name is a personal choice and I see no reason to get cheesed up over it. When the time comes and the GF and I make it offici
53 AM744 : In general I like traditions, so if a was an American with deep roots on the country I'd kindly ask my wife to take my name. I guess it would be a bit
54 767Lover : Socially, and with new clients, I use my husband's last name solely, without my maiden name. However, my email address and stationery still has my mai
55 EA CO AS : Late to the party, are we? Your point was already made (and refuted) in reply 38:
56 Dvk : To each his/her own. Personally, I find hyphenated names unwieldy, and prefer the simplicity of an uncomplicated last name. If I were a married woman,
57 VC10 : This might have been already answered , however if married couples go in for Hyphenated surnames then the children of that marriage will have this dou
58 Slider : I'll probably get flamed as a zealot if I speak my mind on this one. To each his own I guess, but the sacredness of a name means a great deal to most
59 N1120A : Centuries? It is still legal to rape your wife in some US states.
60 Cytz_pilot : Very true. In the months leading up to our wedding, my wife was in university and going through textbooks about the renaissance and in particular a w
61 Tsaord : It really doesn't matter what anyone else thinks or what opinions they have. When two people get married any decisions they make as a married couple i
62 Scbriml : I'm a slow typist, but my point was perfectly valid. As for your refutation, for many women the taking of the man's name still has a stigma attached
63 N1120A : Why should a woman do so? Why not the man?
64 TylerDurden : That is, by far...THE BEST...Southern name I have every heard. Georgia should adopt you. People will never know if it's a name...or a description.
65 Ronglimeng : I've always felt that hyphenated names were annoying and pretenious. It often seems in British comedy that if you are creating a character who is a po
66 Kmh1956 : Ok, here's a novel idea...how about when folks get married if they just swap surnames? The husband takes the wife's maiden name and the wife takes the
67 Falcon84 : Again, to me, that's just pre-planning for another divorce, so it doesn't get 'messy". Again, as far as I'm concerned, when you get married, the old
68 Tsaord : In the Bible it states that the woman takes the last name of the man and he is the head of the household. Not saying that the woman is a servant. Now
69 Falcon84 : I do understand it for professional reason. I have a cousin who is an actress and musician, and her husband has had success on his own. She keeps her
70 Tsaord : Well if you plan on getting married then you work that out with whoever lol. I read a story in the Chicago Sun Times about a man who had a wife that
71 SlamClick : No woman married to me would keep her hyphen! In fact I wouldn't even care if she still had it when we met.
72 Falcon84 : Been married 20 years, so there was nothing to work out.
73 Pyrex : Does it affect Falcon84 if women hyphenate or don't use their husband's name? No. Yet I don't see you calling him out... That is the point of the who
74 MD11Engineer : German chancellor Merkel kept her maiden name. She had a career before she got married (to a successfull university professor), and got known under he
75 JJJ : Around here nobody ever changes names. Before the 50s old snotty types used to add "Señora de XX" to indicate to whom they were married. Hyphenated n
76 Andz : That would only have implications for the man, under traditional convention. BTW my wife's maiden name was Loots, which is Afrikaans for Pilot
77 Revelation : What about the sense of "union" it can suggest? Take one for the team! Happy A.net Anniversary, Scarlet Harlot! One thing I've seen is both people ch
78 LTBEWR : I have worked for law firms and with lawyers for almost 29 years. I have seen a relative few female attorneys go for hypenated names. They did so as a
79 Tsaord : Hold that thought. When I started learning Spanish a year ago it gave me a phrase "La senora de Fernandez" to refer to a married woman in polite form
80 JJJ : In European Spanish it certainly is. Outside of nobility and such no one will say 'señora de -surname-' but her actual name. If you want to stress t
81 Texan : See, I've just always felt that by agreeing to put up with me for the rest of my life she would be honoring both me and my family In all honesty, I u
82 Analog : That kind of thing really bugs me. It's bad enough if it's Mr. & Mrs. John Smith, but when it's Mrs. John Smith... that's just crazy. Although it cou
83 N1120A : Here is something even more funny. Lawyers generally don't refer to themselves as Doctor, unless they also have a Ph.D, S.JD or some other doctoral d
84 Slider : Tsaord nailed the response. I’m sorry, I must have missed the part where there was a statute of limitations of God’s word. Maybe you can show me
85 A342 : As did one of my former teachers. He is mow married for the third time and has changed his last name at least twice. The reason he did it this time:
86 MaidensGator : That reminded me of a lawyer I litigated against. The guy had been a surgeon for about 25 years, retired and went to law school. He signed everything
87 AM744 : Presidents' wives are customarily referred to in that way. It is also used by some people in certain situations, it's not completely outdated, but it
88 HuskyAviation : I have no female colleagues in my office that have hyphenated names--approx. 35 female attorneys. They've either adopted their husband's name before
89 Analog : One thing that's surprised me about having different last names is that the Mrs. (Dr.?) & I have never been asked to provide evidence of being married
90 ScarletHarlot : I did spend a lot of time in Georgia when Delta Air Lines was my client. I learned how to say "thank yeeeeeeew" and "fraaahd chick'n". I don't like s
91 Lincoln : Aparently your travels didn't take you through DTW. True story: For the reasons listed above, no boarding pass has my true legal name on them, it's u
92 Duke : Hyphenated names may work for some. I find them cumbersome. I dislike the fact that so many women in today's world take their husband's name, or at le
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