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Supercomputers: Size Matters.  
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1306 times:

Wonder no more. This time it's official.


How does your region measure up?

http://www.top500.org/list/2008/06/100

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLOT767-300ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1292 times:

Did you see the cost of building the LANL? $100 million and it runs at one petaflop (1000 trillion calculations per second)

From: http://www.top500.org/system/9485

"System Name Roadrunner
Site DOE/NNSA/LANL
System Family IBM Cluster
System Model BladeCenter QS22 Cluster
Computer BladeCenter QS22/LS21 Cluster, PowerXCell 8i 3.2 Ghz / Opteron DC 1.8 GHz , Voltaire Infiniband
Vendor IBM
Application area Not Specified
Installation Year 2008

Operating System Linux
Interconnect Infiniband
Processor PowerXCell 8i 3200 MHz (12.8 GFlops)


In 2006, the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration selected Los Alamos National Laboratory as the development site for Roadrunner and IBM as the computer’s designer and builder. Roadrunner, named after the New Mexico state bird, cost about $100 million, and was a three-phase project to deliver the world’s first “hybrid” supercomputer – one powerful enough to operate at one petaflop (one thousand trillion calculations per second). That’s twice as fast as the current No.1 rated IBM Blue Gene system at Lawrence Livermore National Lab – itself nearly three times faster than the leading contenders on the current TOP 500 list of worldwide supercomputers.
Roadrunner will primarily be used to ensure the safety and reliability of the nation’s nuclear weapons stockpile. It will also be used for research into astronomy, energy, human genome science and climate change.
Roadrunner is the world’s first hybrid supercomputer. In a first-of-a-kind design, the Cell Broadband Engine® -- originally designed for video game platforms such as the Sony Playstation 3® -- will work in conjunction with x86 processors from AMD®.
Made from Commercial Parts. In total, Roadrunner connects 6,562 dual-core AMD Opteron® chips as well as 12,240 Cell chips (on IBM Model QS22 blade servers). The Roadrunner system has 98 terabytes of memory, and is housed in 278 refrigerator-sized, IBM BladeCenter® racks occupying 5,200 square feet. Its 10,000 connections – both Infiniband and Gigabit Ethernet -- require 55 miles of fiber optic cable. Roadrunner weighs 500,000 lbs. Companies that contributed components and technology include; Emcore, Flextronics, Mellanox and Voltaire.
Custom Configuration. Two IBM QS22 blade servers and one IBM LS21 blade server are combined into a specialized “tri-blade” configuration for Roadrunner. The machine is composed of a total of 3,060 tri-blades built in IBM’s Rochester, Minn. plant. Standard processing (e.g., file system I/O) is handled by the Opteron processors. Mathematically and CPU-intensive elements are directed to the Cell processors. Each tri-blade unit can run at 400 billion operations per second (400 Gigaflops).
The machine was built, tested and benchmarked in IBM’s Poughkeepsie, N.Y. plant, home of the ASCI series of supercomputers the company built for the US government in the late 1990s. IBM’s site in Rochester, Minn. constructed the specialized tri-blade servers. Software development was led by IBM engineers in Austin, Texas and by researchers in IBM’s Yorktown Heights, N.Y. research lab. Roadrunner will be loaded onto 21 tractor trailer trucks later this summer when it is delivered to Los Alamos National Lab in New Mexico.
Roadrunner operates on open-source Linux software from Red Hat.
Energy Miser. Compared to most traditional supercomputer designs, Roadrunner’s hybrid format sips power (2.35 megawatts) and delivers world-leading efficiency – 437 million calculations per watt. IBM expects Roadrunner to place among the top energy-efficient systems later in June when the official “Green 500” list of supercomputers is issued.
IBM is developing new software to make Cell-powered hybrid computing broadly accessible. Roadrunner’s massive software effort targets commercial applications for hybrid supercomputing. With corporate and academic partners, IBM is developing an open-source ecosystem that will bring hybrid supercomputing to financial services, energy exploration and medical imaging industries among others.
Applications for Cell-based hybrid supercomputing include: calculating cause and effect in capital markets in real-time, supercomputers in financial services can instantly predict the ripple effect of a stock market change throughout the markets. In medicine, complex 3-D renderings of tissues and bone structures will happen in real-time, as patients are being examined. "

I wonder how it runs FS  rotfl 


User currently offlineSan747 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 4943 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (6 years 1 day ago) and read 1257 times:



Quoting LOT767-300ER (Reply 1):

I wonder how it runs FS rotfl

15 FPS at JFK with 100% traffic! Big grin



Scotty doesn't know...
User currently offlineConnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 3, posted (6 years 21 hours ago) and read 1214 times:

Soon all this will be redundant -- everyone will be able to have a supercomputer in their den:

http://nextbigfuture.com/2008/09/cray-cx-1-personal-supercomputer.html  bouncy 



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12565 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (6 years 20 hours ago) and read 1210 times:



Quoting LOT767-300ER (Reply 1):
Applications for Cell-based hybrid supercomputing include: calculating cause and effect in capital markets in real-time, supercomputers in financial services can instantly predict the ripple effect of a stock market change throughout the markets.

Apparently not well enough! Sad



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (6 years 18 hours ago) and read 1191 times:

Revelation,

You mean this computer will know everything about everything?


Blackbird


User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 17 hours ago) and read 1176 times:



Quoting Blackbird (Reply 5):
You mean this computer will know everything about everything?

And everybody. Remote mind probes, externally directed brain dumps and everything.

Trade that tinfoil hat in for some good shielding and some solid ground straps.


 Wink


User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (6 years 17 hours ago) and read 1175 times:

Dougloid,

I would assume that would be sarcasm?


Blackbird


User currently offlinePhoenix9 From Canada, joined Aug 2007, 2546 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (6 years 17 hours ago) and read 1161 times:



Quoting Blackbird (Reply 7):
I would assume that would be sarcasm?

He's not joking. The computer is apparently also has secret functionality hidden within the 'intended' function. The computer connects to a worldwide satellite network that taps into you cell phone, PDA and other electronics to gather evidence and assess if you are a threat to national security. To make things worse, the data is stored off site and is accessible to FBI, CIA, Mi6 and other Interpol agencies.

Think about it...the 'intended' functions of the computer are already well managed by the current super-computers. Why would 'they' need 10 times more power??



Life only makes sense when you look at it backwards.
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 16 hours ago) and read 1158 times:



Quoting Blackbird (Reply 7):
Dougloid,

I would assume that would be sarcasm?

Yes ma'am.


User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 10, posted (6 years 16 hours ago) and read 1155 times:



Quoting Phoenix9 (Reply 8):
Think about it...the 'intended' functions of the computer are already well managed by the current super-computers. Why would 'they' need 10 times more power??

All I want to do is to get Windows ME back working on one particular machine 'cos drawing lines in tables is so much easier in Word 6 than its descendents. So all this passes me by - again!


User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (6 years 16 hours ago) and read 1140 times:



Quoting Baroque (Reply 10):
Quoting Phoenix9 (Reply 8):
Think about it...the 'intended' functions of the computer are already well managed by the current super-computers. Why would 'they' need 10 times more power??

All I want to do is to get Windows ME back working on one particular machine 'cos drawing lines in tables is so much easier in Word 6 than its descendents. So all this passes me by - again!

I was in court back in April and the judge made everyone wait until he could get his computer booted to take notes. It still had Windows 98.


User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 12, posted (6 years 16 hours ago) and read 1136 times:



Quoting Dougloid (Reply 11):
I was in court back in April and the judge made everyone wait until he could get his computer booted to take notes. It still had Windows 98.

I would be back there already except I think you get in a bigger mess overloading ME with 98SE!!!

I wonder if these supercomputers, or any other for that matter can read all the stuff written in the 70s in what turned into Displaywrite. I know Wordpro reads DW4, but not IIRC DW3 let alone the earlier still versions.


User currently offlineWildcatYXU From Canada, joined May 2006, 2614 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (6 years 15 hours ago) and read 1129 times:



Quoting Blackbird (Reply 5):
You mean this computer will know everything about everything?

Yes. And the answer to every question will be "42"


User currently offlineLOT767-300ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (6 years 13 hours ago) and read 1102 times:

I think this is a necessary read for everyone in this thread:

HAL9000 (Space Odyssey) vs WOPR (War Games)
http://www.grudge-match.com/History/hal-wopr.shtml


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