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Continuing The Musical Theme About Banks Folding  
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 1359 times:

Since I started the last one about Wachovia "Another one bites the dust"

How about this:

Who'll Be The Next In Line?

13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 35
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1341 times:

How about "....On A Train Bound For Nowhere.."?  Smile

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kn481KcjvMo



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 4059 posts, RR: 30
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1341 times:



Quoting Dougloid (Thread starter):
Who'll Be The Next In Line?

$10 on National City (before the end of the week).



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21521 posts, RR: 53
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 1307 times:

None better: Wall Street Shuffle - 10cc



User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1275 times:

I like it so far.

How about "Turn Out The Lights, The Party's Over"?


User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 47
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1226 times:

Baby baby come back, maybe next week.
'Cuz ya see I'm on a lose'n streak.



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlineWunalaYann From Australia, joined Mar 2005, 2839 posts, RR: 25
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1219 times:



Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 5):
Baby baby come back, maybe next week.
'Cuz ya see I'm on a lose'n streak.

 bigthumbsup  And we certainly can't get no satisfaction either way...

How about "Mr Banker" by Lynyrd Skynyrd?


User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 47
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 1188 times:



Quoting WunalaYann (Reply 6):
Mr Banker"

Weird. I just heard that track on a Sirius channel last week.
It's been at least 15 years before that since I've heard it. Good call.  cool 

These lyrics are from a track recorded by an amazing little 2 man band called "10 CC" (Lol Creme & Kevin Godley) titled "The Wall St. shuffle". It goes back to the 70's and as you can see, nothing has changed.

Do the Wall Street shuffle
Hear the money rustle
Watch the greenbacks tumble
Feel the Sterling crumble

You've gotta be cool on Wall Street
When your index is low
Dow Jones ain't got time for the bums
They wind up on skid row with holes in their pockets
They plead with you, buddy can you spare the dime
But you ain't got the time

To do the Wall Street Shuffle
Let your money hustle
Bet you'd sell your mother
You can buy another

On Wall Street

Doin' the....
Doin' the....



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 47
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1166 times:



Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
None better: Wall Street Shuffle - 10cc

Dang!
How'd I miss that post?  duck 
Anyway, good call as usual Klaus.



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1151 times:

How about this for all the people who were soon to be former employees of Wachovia?

Well, the last thing I remember Doc
I started to swerve
And then I saw the Jag slide into the curve
I know I won't forget that horrible sight
I guess I found out for myself that everyone was right:
"You won't come back from Deadman's Curve"


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 1137 times:

"When The Boat Comes in....."

A pure personal indulgence, this - if no-one else can understand it, or get interested in it, I won't be surprised (or offended  Smile).

But, I'd better explain (as briefly as I can) that I mainly learned my trade (which was financing and building things like new towns) in North-East England. Lived there for over ten years, my kids were all born there.

It was an area that had endured half-a-century of recessions punctuated by wars - the only available work, most of the time, being fishing or coalmining. Or the Army or Navy - like a guy I once met in West Virginia, who told me, "The only career choices most kids in this town have are a Macdonalds uniform or a Marine uniform.....". I think I can honestly say that my colleagues and I went a fair way towards changing that for good.

While I was living there, the BBC - an organisation that has remained chockful of talent, despite the best efforts of some of its managers to eliminate any such thing - produced a TV series which chronicled life in the North-East in the Depression, which became an all-time hit. The 'theme tune' of the series was a traditional Tyneside ditty called 'When The Boat Comes In.'

It referred to the fact that the only time most families in the region ever got anything like a square meal was when the fishing fleet returned wirth a good catch. Booze was cheap, food was just about unobtainable.

The BBC hired a highly-talented folk-singer, Alex Glasgow, to perform it in the original accent. Against all the odds, the series and the song became worldwide hits. There's a link below to the 'theme' Alex provided.

North-East England has a broad accent/dialect which owes almost as much to its fellow North Sea fishermen (the Vikings, and later the Norwegians and Danes) as it does to the English and the Normans.

"Thoo shult hev a fishy, on a little dishy, thoo shult hev a mack'rel, when the boo-at cooms in........"

So the second link below provides a translation into some sort of 'standard English.'

Don't know what the point of this is, really. Except maybe to say that, in my book anyway, ANY price is worth paying to avoid yet another 'Great Depression.'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utkMQJeiK50

http://ingeb.org/songs/comehere.html

Sorry to ramble, guys.............



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14139 posts, RR: 62
Reply 11, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 1132 times:



Quoting NAV20 (Reply 10):
While I was living there, the BBC - an organisation that has remained chockful of talent, despite the best efforts of some of its managers to eliminate any such thing - produced a TV series which chronicled life in the North-East in the Depression, which became an all-time hit. The 'theme tune' of the series was a traditional Tyneside ditty called 'When The Boat Comes In.'

It referred to the fact that the only time most families in the region ever got anything like a square meal was when the fishing fleet returned wirth a good catch. Booze was cheap, food was just about unobtainable.

The BBC hired a highly-talented folk-singer, Alex Glasgow, to perform it in the original accent. Against all the odds, the series and the song became worldwide hits. There's a link below to the 'theme' Alex provided.

North-East England has a broad accent/dialect which owes almost as much to its fellow North Sea fishermen (the Vikings, and later the Norwegians and Danes) as it does to the English and the Normans.

"Thoo shult hev a fishy, on a little dishy, thoo shult hev a mack'rel, when the boo-at cooms in........"

So the second link below provides a translation into some sort of 'standard English.'

Didn't the BBC make a programme about the North Eastern English fishing industry with music by the Scottish folksinger Ewan McColl in the 1960s? With famous songs as "Shoals of Herring"?

Jan


User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 1121 times:



Quoting NAV20 (Reply 10):
Sorry to ramble, guys.............



Quoting NAV20 (Reply 10):
Don't know what the point of this is, really. Except maybe to say that, in my book anyway, ANY price is worth paying to avoid yet another 'Great Depression.'

Big version: Width: 282 Height: 320 File size: 21kb


My old man grew up in South Florida during the great depression-that's him when he was in his middle twenties and had landed a job at Curtiss Wright with a regular paycheck.

when the stock market crash came along the first thing that happened was disposable income dried up, which put paid to his father's charter boat business. This happened when he was 10 years old. His job became going catching rattlesnakes and selling them to people who made antivenom for snake bites-they would fetch five cents a foot live. With what he earned, that would buy .22 caliber cartridges to shoot rabbits for the table. I always wondered how he'd become a good marksman. He had practice. When they'd rounded up sufficient money to buy gas, they'd fish for grouper and sell them off the back of a pickup truck to what my father called 'colored folks', and the cycle would repeat itself.

Father was very picky about his chow, I guess because of his experiences. On the occasions that fish or game might have made its way to the table, he'd get really bent out of shape. The war was no better because about all that was available was what mother called Beltsville Turkeys-and turkey only appeared once a year because custom demanded it.

There were very few times I saw him get really angry, and two of those times were when Mother had been given venison by a neighbor, and once when she decided to make hasenpfeffer. He picked up his chair and raised it high above his head before deciding that he did not want to smash it down on the dining room table. The legs left two small square holes in the plaster of the ceiling that were occasionally pointed to when he started to lose his temper over something.


User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8974 posts, RR: 39
Reply 13, posted (6 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 1116 times:

If I may, the following is not musical, but it has to do with our "credit economy" and thus banks.

Quote:
I want to be a Consumer

By Patrick Barrington

"and what do you mean to be?"
The kind old Bishop said
As he took the boy on his ample knee
And patted his curly head.


"We should all of us choose a calling
To help Society's plan;
Then what do you mean to be, my boy,
When you grow to be a man?"


"I want to be a Consumer,"
The bright-haired lad replied
As he gazed up into the Bishop's face
In innocence open-eyed.
"I've never had aims of a selfish sort,
For that, as I know, is wrong.


I want to be a Consumer, Sir,
And help the world along.
"I want to be a Consumer
And work both night and day,
For that is the thing that's needed most,
I've heard Economists say.
I won't just be a Producer,
Like Bobby and James and John;
I want to be a Consumer, Sir,
And help the nation on."


"But what do you want to be?"
The Bishop said again,
"For we all of us have to work," said he,
"As must, I think, be plain.
Are you thinking of studying medicine
Or taking a Bar exam?"
"Why, no!" the bright-haired lad replied
As he helped himself to jam.


"I want to he a Consumer
And live in a useful way;
For that is the thing that's needed most,
I've heard Economists say.
There are too many people working
And too many things are made.
I want to be a Consumer, Sir,
And help to further Trade.


"I want to be a Consumer
And do my duty well;
For that is the thing that's needed most,
I've heard Economists tell.
I've made up my mind," the lad was heard,
As he lit a cigar, to say;
"I want to be a Consumer, Sir,
And I want to begin today."

This satire appeared in the April 25, 1934 issue of Punch.



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
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