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Shop Found Frozen In Time For 40 Years  
User currently offlineOa260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26844 posts, RR: 58
Posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4622 times:

I found this video/news piece amazing. Would be cool to look around it. Its time frozen. Also great to see brands that are famous today .

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/7664661.stm

A boarded-up shop in Lancashire was found to have been left in exactly the same state as when it stopped trading more than 40 years ago.

---------------

Does anyone know of any similar stories ? ( Apart from in Cyprus of course ).

29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLuv2fly From United States of America, joined May 2003, 12090 posts, RR: 49
Reply 1, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4572 times:

Talk about a blast from the past. I have to ask how could this building just sit like this for such a long time?


You can cut the irony with a knife
User currently offlineUK_Dispatcher From United Arab Emirates, joined Dec 2001, 2589 posts, RR: 30
Reply 2, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4571 times:

Amazing. I love seeing stuff like that.

I'm amazed how long the building had remained unused though.


User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6071 posts, RR: 29
Reply 3, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 4486 times:
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I ran into this kind of thing myself back in 2004, in St. Louis. My friend, Don, and I were checking out depot for the old Gast brewery in St. Louis. Gast closed in 1949, but its depot near the Mississippi river was closed with prohibition. The building has been in use by a electric motor recycler since 1932. Don and I like to visit old brewery sites and neither of us had ever been to this place. We talked to the owner and he agreed to show us around. His father started the business in 1932. On the top floor there was a huge room full of WWII aircraft parts. Hus father had bought the stuff cheap after the war and planned on scrapping the stuff out if business ever got slow. It never got slow it still sits up there. They have been selling the parts off these days making far more money than they ever planned. Not only was that cool, but we found an office on the top floor that had been used by an attorney. This office was just as it was left in 1937 when the attorney died. There was even a June 1937 calender on the wall. The file cabinets and desks were all covered with dust and dirt. The roof and windows were intact and the electricity was still working. It seems that the attorney rented the office from this guys father and when he died they never bothered to rent it again st their was no need to throw anything out. The windows and roof were in good shape and since it is contained in a operating business there is nobody from the outside getting in. The office at one time had an exterior door on the ground level with stairs going up to it and a few other offices. In the 40s the building face was updated door way was bricked up. Today there is a staircase to nowhere in that building and the only way to get in is through the inside.

There was hundreds of files from civil cases from 1888 to 1937. The guy let us go through them to look for anything that had to do with St. Louis brewing history. We found a few things that were of interest so we were allowed to keep them. I also ran accross the Missouri license and articles of incorpoartion for a distillery that never opened, but was built. All of the legal paperwork was thhere along with photos. All of it very clean. I donated it to the Museum of Whiskey History in Bardstown, Kentucky. They were very happy to get it. Most of the cases were accident cases involving property damage. There were many very clean old photographs involving accidents, including one where a cheese truck overturned in 1911. The truck avoided a jay walker and jumped the curb. The truck rolled over spilling cheese all over the street. The cheese company was suing the jay walker for the cost of the lost cheese. There were also hundreds of cases where this lawyer argued on behalf for Sears in product liability claims. There was also a lot of paperwork for the Missouri Republican party in the early 1900s.

It was a good find and a neat little piece of history that is still hidden from most people today.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineKiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8539 posts, RR: 13
Reply 4, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 4478 times:
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ever been to a supermarket in Belgium ? they were frozen in time at some indefinite point in the past before the concept of customer service was invented


Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlinePanAm330 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2669 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 4460 times:

I love seeing stuff like this. Anybody know of any other stories like it? And Falstaff, that's a really cool story.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29791 posts, RR: 58
Reply 6, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 4450 times:



Quoting Kiwiandrew (Reply 4):
ever been to a supermarket in Belgium ? they were frozen in time at some indefinite point in the past before the concept of customer service was invented

We have stores like that....ever been to a Circle K?



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 4361 times:



Quoting PanAm330 (Reply 5):
I love seeing stuff like this. Anybody know of any other stories like it? And Falstaff, that's a really cool story.

Last year or the year before the contents of a grocery store in South Dakota that had closed and was boarded up were sold at auction, and I'm sorry I missed it. Apparently the owner had ceased trading and closed the place up just as it was.

Last summer we went to a sale at the Lewis Sundries store in Allerton, Iowa. It had started as a drugstore in the 1890s and had passed through several owners before being closed up when the last owner died. Much of the best soda fountain stuff was sold by Rich Penn Auctions and we saw what was left. It had been a drug store, a paint store, a veterinary supply house and a sundries and soda fountain. In the sliding door cabinets behind the counters were all kinds of old patent medicines, paint cans with their bottoms rusting out, and in one memorable cabinet were six large cans of chlordane that the bottoms had rusted out of.

On this general subject I do go to a lot of auctions and I was at one yesterday where the old guy who died had 500 pounds of black powder stashed in the basement. They had to call the sheriff to take the stuff away. One other memorable sale I went to, I looked in an old tumbledown garage behind the place and one wall was stacked with loaded gas cylinders containing ethyl bromide and methyl bromide that are used as tent fumigants. The cylinders were at least 40 years old judging by the inspection stamps on them.

I beat a hasty retreat.


User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6071 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 4310 times:
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Quoting Dougloid (Reply 7):
and in one memorable cabinet were six large cans of chlordane that the bottoms had rusted out of.

Chlordane was great stuff. Sure it is dangerous, but it works. I have a friend who has several old cans of it. He used some at his home a couple of years ago. It has been pest free since. I always keep an eye out for old chemicals that the government has outlawed, you never know when they might come in handy. I have several cans of lead house paint at work. I doubt it is even good anymore, but I like the idea that I own them.

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 7):
ethyl bromide and methyl bromide that are used as tent fumigants

I bet it worked great, not good for you, but....

Back in May I was at an auction in Southern Illinois at an old beer distributor. He closed in 1997 and every thing was left in there. Over over in the next building was his grocery store that closed in 1964. There was no stock on the shelves, but all the fixtures and equipment was still in there. It all sold at the auction fairly cheap. In the back room there was an old wooden refrigerated railroad car without the trucks. I guess this guy used it as a meat cooler. It was very clean and still had all the railroad markings on it. You would have had to tear out the wall to get it out of there.

The beer distributor part was loaded with advertising for Stag, Carling Black Label, Red Cap Ale, Falls City (pre 1978) and Colt 45 stuff. Being down in Southern Illinois the Stag stuff went high, but everything else went cheap. The stuff ranged from the 1930s to 1997. We were all amazed at how high the Stag stuff went to the locals. A lot of the beer collectors who were there wished these people would come out when we have a show. They were paying $100 plus for items that go for $25 at local brewery collectible meets. Some of the other brands, that have higher value in other markets was going DIRT cheap.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11153 posts, RR: 59
Reply 9, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 4295 times:

Fascinating...it should be preserved...


"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29791 posts, RR: 58
Reply 10, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 4295 times:



Quoting Dougloid (Reply 7):
They had to call the sheriff to take the stuff away.

Why,

Usually that stuff is in airtight containers and so is really pretty stable especially if the temperture doesn't fluxuate



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6071 posts, RR: 29
Reply 11, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4228 times:
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Quoting L-188 (Reply 10):
Why,

Usually that stuff is in airtight containers and so is really pretty stable especially if the temperture doesn't fluxuate

Could be that nobody wanted to buy it. You certainly couldn't just toss it all in a dumpster.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4209 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Reply 8):
The stuff ranged from the 1930s to 1997. We were all amazed at how high the Stag stuff went to the locals. A lot of the beer collectors who were there wished these people would come out when we have a show. They were paying $100 plus for items that go for $25 at local brewery collectible meets. Some of the other brands, that have higher value in other markets was going DIRT cheap.

One of the best laughs at auctions around these parts is when there's some Griesedieck Beer advertising material, which shows up from time to time. Seeing the auctioneer and ringmen wrestling with pronunciation usually leads to a lot of guffaws and low humor.

I understand someone's taken up the name, but whether it's the same stuff is unknown to me-I understand it was good German St. Louis stuff.

I've got a nice new Storz clock that I bought new in the box at a yard sale for twenty bucks.


User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6299 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4203 times:

I heard that the US Embassy in Libya was left in such a hurry back when relations between the two countries broke down that everything was just left as is for a very long time...not sure if it still is, what with increasing relations once again between USA and Libya, but that's what I had read somewhere a few years back. Coffee cups and papers still on desks, etc.

User currently offlineWhappeh From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 1562 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4189 times:

Not in the same cheery manner, but when I was in Western Ireland a few years back, we were in a town called Ennistimon... the guy we were with said that a year or so before that someone had bought a building there who had the basement/cellar boarded over for long before the people he had bought it from had owned it. They opened it up and went down into there and found 4 corpses from the time of the Potato Famine down there, as well as time appropriate goods and such. Kind of sad to think about.


-Travel now, journey infinitely.
User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6071 posts, RR: 29
Reply 15, posted (5 years 9 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 4168 times:
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Quoting Dougloid (Reply 12):
some Griesedieck Beer advertising material, which shows up from time to time

Griesedieck Brothers closed in 1957 when the Falstaff Brewing Corporation bought the brewery and made it their 10th plant. The Griesedieck family that owned Falstaff was part of the same family that owned Griesedieck Brothers. Another branch of the family owned Griesedieck-Western (Stag) across the river in Belleville, Illinois. They sold out to Carling in 1954. Falstaff reintroduced the Griesedieck name in 1971 on Malt liquour and Griesedieck Brothers in 1975. The GB labels from the 70s are almost identical to the early 1950s ones. A lot of times you will see 1970s GB stuff being misrepresented as 1950s stuff.

The Griesedieck family bought the rights back to the name a few years ago and has their beer contract brewed for them. It is supposedly the same recipe, but the strain of yeast is different.

Quoting Dougloid (Reply 12):
I've got a nice new Storz clock that I bought new in the box at a yard sale for twenty bucks.

Cool. Are you a breweriana collector?



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 4027 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Reply 15):
Quoting Dougloid (Reply 12):
I've got a nice new Storz clock that I bought new in the box at a yard sale for twenty bucks.

Cool. Are you a breweriana collector?

Not really, I like advertising clocks and this seemed like a good one.

However, you may be able to find me something.

When I lived in Los Angeles in the late seventies there were a few places that had a Budweiser neon sign in the shape of an electric guitar, but below the white "Bud" lettering the sign had 'cerveza' in red.

I may have only seen one or two of them. The sign without the additional lettering is not uncommon and I know of one about four miles from here.

It looked like the one in this sale only saying Bud in the middle with cerveza below.

http://cgi.ebay.com/budweiser-beer-l...65:1|240:1318&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 17, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3992 times:

Believe it or not, we still have them here in Australia - though they're called 'milk-bars'. I visit my local one almost every day for a couple of items - even though I could buy them cheaper in Safeway - because they're an institution. They also provide good service for almost anything for older, less mobile people who can't or don't wish to drive - and the schoolkids.

They're open from 7am. to 9 pm., seven days a week. The proprietors of my local one are a Chinese couple - 'Wendy' and 'Sam' - who are nice people and good friends. Their little son - 'Sean' - looks forward to my visits as he's interested in aeroplanes and I can usually find him a photograph of any particular type he fancies knowing more about.

It's nonsense as a business, of course - Wendy has to work all hours and Sam (who is a computer software engineer during the day) could probably make a much higher net income if he didn't have to rush home as early as he possibly can to give her a break. But they're determined to keep it going.

Oddly enough, they're facing a big challenge at the moment. The 'bottleshop' opposite ('off-licence' in British-ese) recently changed hands, and the new owners cleared out the back storage room and set up in the grocery business (they even sell milk!). Wendy and Sam have responded by painting their place out, reorganising the shelving, lighting, and displays, and spending $2,000 on an iced-drink dispenser for the schoolkids (there's a school right on the corner). Time will tell if it all pays off.

I sometimes buy booze in that bottleshop (the couple who own it are pleasant enough people too), so I've found myself doing a bit of 'industrial espionage' on Wendy and Sam's behalf. Recently I've been able to report that they've cut the price of both Teacher's whisky and Cascade light beer (my preferred brands) to the bone, and that (probably more important) their milk fridge is always almost empty (presumably because they're not sellng enough to make it worthwhile to maintain a decent stock). So they don't appear to be doing too well.

Fun still to have little local places like that around. Sorry to hear that (judging by the video in the thread starter) they're now a thing of the past in the UK.



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13029 posts, RR: 12
Reply 18, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3976 times:

I think it was about 10 years ago in Arizona that I believe as part of dealing withn an estate, there was found an old, large garage where a bunch of cars from the 1930's to 1950's were stored and in excellent condition. On another website I go to, there was a discussion of an old car dealership in the UK where there an a number of 1950's to 1960's cars, some still new, with only delivery milege, including Fiats and some others.
There are outfits that do house clean-outs, usually so the house can be sold or fixed up. They love to go into older homes, especially where elderly owner/owners have died and haven't been cleaned out in many years so they will often find antique items, collectibles, all kinds of stuff of value long forgotten that they will resell and make a nice buck off of. They then sell it in their own store or to collectable's stores/shows. Even old parts of houses like fireplace mantlepieces, fancy woodwork, doors and the like when they renovate or tear down old homes has value.
I find it surprising that with the rising values (until recently) of property in the last 10 years that there are still a few 'frozen in time' places left. Probably most are in rural areas.


User currently offlineMyt332 From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 9112 posts, RR: 71
Reply 19, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3938 times:

Weird or what but hey, it's Accrington, bit of a weird place. I only live about 25 minutes away from that shop too!


One Life, Live it.
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3938 times:



Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 18):
think it was about 10 years ago in Arizona that I believe as part of dealing withn an estate, there was found an old, large garage where a bunch of cars from the 1930's to 1950's were stored and in excellent condition. On another website I go to, there was a discussion of an old car dealership in the UK where there an a number of 1950's to 1960's cars, some still new, with only delivery milege, including Fiats and some others.

Some folks think this sort of thing is folklore and urban mythology but there is one documented case I have heard of. This was a 1954 Corvette that had been walled up in a grocery store in Brunswick, Maine. I've posted a link to it.

I have also heard rumors of an Indian motorcycle shop in California that had closed and been boarded up after the factory folded in 1953 but that's rumor so far.

http://www.proteam-corvette.com/entombed.html

I can tell you a story I have first hand knowledge of. Sometimes when there's a place that's an absolute mess, an auctioneer will sell picking rights. I've done that myself on one occasion where i bought picking rights to a boarded up teevee and radio shop. It was fun.

A couple gals I know bought picking rights to the basement of an old house on the east side of Des Moines a couple years ago, and they paid $700 for the privilege. They tossed a coin for the north half/south half and the one who got the north half found the little old lady's stash of silver coin and maybe other currency. The next time I saw Sally she was driving a brand new Chevrolet pickup truck, and she's been off the circuit for a while.


User currently offlineCumulus From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2006, 1402 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3923 times:

www.abandoned-places.com

It's all done by a 767 Pilot in his spare time - cool website.

Also this one:-

http://www.lostamerica.com/

(His effects with night photography are stunning).

[Edited 2008-10-13 09:01:46]


What Goes Up Must Come Down, Hopefully In One Piece!
User currently offlineVirgin744 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 919 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3757 times:

I think they should make the shop into a museum. Plenty of people would visit and the time and effort needed to collect all the items that date back 40yrs would be pretty hard.

User currently offlineTWFirst From Vatican City, joined Apr 2000, 6346 posts, RR: 52
Reply 23, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3693 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Reply 15):
Griesedieck Brothers closed in 1957 when the Falstaff Brewing Corporation bought the brewery and made it their 10th plant. The Griesedieck family that owned Falstaff was part of the same family that owned Griesedieck Brothers. Another branch of the family owned Griesedieck-Western (Stag) across the river in Belleville, Illinois. They sold out to Carling in 1954. Falstaff reintroduced the Griesedieck name in 1971 on Malt liquour and Griesedieck Brothers in 1975. The GB labels from the 70s are almost identical to the early 1950s ones. A lot of times you will see 1970s GB stuff being misrepresented as 1950s stuff.

The Griesedieck family bought the rights back to the name a few years ago and has their beer contract brewed for them. It is supposedly the same recipe, but the strain of yeast is different.

Fascinating. My grandfather drank Griesedieck. And I remember the Falstaff brand from my youth in Central Illinois.



An unexamined life isn't worth living.
User currently offlineOa260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26844 posts, RR: 58
Reply 24, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day ago) and read 3462 times:



Quoting Virgin744 (Reply 22):
I think they should make the shop into a museum. Plenty of people would visit and the time and effort needed to collect all the items that date back 40yrs would be pretty hard.

Very true . It would be a great idea to preserve it but I doubt they will.


25 Bongodog1964 : Most UK towns have a shop frozen in time for 40 years; just look for the Woolworths sign above the door
26 MD11Engineer : I have been in Ennistimon, Co. Clare. Whereabouts was this house? Jan
27 SmithAir747 : If you want to see a whole CITY frozen in time, just go visit Pripyat, Ukraine, the city where the Chernobyl power plant was located and its workers l
28 Whappeh : I don't recall exactly, as the man that pointed it out wasn't that exact. He claimed it was a butchers shop owned by a German, if I recall correctly.
29 Oa260 : LOL.... too funny. But oh so true. Thats mad . Is it really true do you think?
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