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The New York City Subway - Impressions?  
User currently offlineHOONS90 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 2947 posts, RR: 53
Posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 5882 times:
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Having spent a considerable time touring NYC's subway system, I was thoroughly intrigued in the way which the system was set up. What I particularly enjoyed was the express trains-- There's no better way of commuting, zipping under Lexington Avenue or Broadway while knowing that there's a huge traffic jam above you.

Granted, most of the underground stations look rather grubby, but there's 468 stations in the system, most of them built before the 50's. At least many of the trains are new, the 2, 4, 5, 6, J, M, Z, L, N, Q, W routes mostly have the latest R142/R143/R160 series trains running on them.

So, how are your experiences using the NYC subway system, and would you consider it to be your most preferred method of getting around in NYC?

http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p55/hl7534/R62A_IMG_2184.jpg
R62A type subway train approaching Queensboro Plaza on the 7 Express Service, on the IRT Flushing Line. Picture taken on October 24, 2008


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51 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineElite From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2006, 2784 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 5867 times:

My preferred method would be to walk, since NYC is ridiculously easy to walk around when compared to say, Los Angeles. But for long distances yes, I use the Subway, even though I'm not a fan of it.

User currently offlineIAirAllie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 5865 times:

It's efficient I like it. There are certainly cleaner transit systems in other cities but often they do not run as fequently or as late as they do in NYC.

User currently offlineJFK69 From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1389 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 5798 times:

Its hot as hell during the summer, its frezing during the winter, You sit next to everything from Stockbrokers to drug dealers.....As a born and bred New Yorker, there is Nothing better!!!!

I drive half the time and I take the subway the other half. Its nice to sit on the train and read and be where you want in 20 minutes, but I also enjoy the peace and quite of my car....and a 1 hour commute.


User currently offlineCharles79 From Puerto Rico, joined Mar 2007, 1322 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 5790 times:

It gets the job done very efficiently and you can connect nearly any two dots on the map with a train ride. Yeah, there are cleaner systems with newer cars/stations but as public transport goes it is one of the best for a reason.

Having just moved out of Los Angeles I can certainly appreciate having a Metro here in DC. It's nowhere near as frequent or comprehensive as the one in NYC but it's good enough that I have only driven my car twice in 3 weeks.


User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7737 posts, RR: 16
Reply 5, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 5780 times:

While the coverage and service is pretty extensive the NYC subway has some serious shortcomings.

The first and probably most serious, is an aging infrastructure. Those really nasty years in the 70s and 80s when NYC was practically bankrupt certainly has had its toll on the system. I cannot imagine how many millions, perhaps billions, of dollars in deferred maintenance exists in the system.

Second it is horribly Manhattan-centric... even then much more so on Lower and Midtown. Granted the majority of the wealth and the major employment centers are there but still. Even within Manhattan there are notable gaps, which the new 2nd Ave subway (finally being built after being proposed for the better part of a century) will help to alleviate.

Third little connectivity between the outer boroughs. If you want to go from Brooklyn to Queens, Brooklyn to the Bronx, or some other combo you really cannot do this on the subway. And if you can you have to go through Manhattan.

Forth accessibility is a huge issue. It would cost billions of dollars to bring the stations up to a reasonable standard of access. Not to mention make them larger for the current and projected traffic numbers and make them safer.

And finally everything smells of urine down there.


But there isn't another city like NYC. And for the most part the MTA does a good job with the hand it is dealt.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16693 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 5770 times:

What separates the NYC subway system from most in the World are it's express tracks, most of the major lines in Manhattan have four tracks (two local, two express). That makes it one of the most convenient in the world.

The best system is the PATH, it's way cleaner than the Subway especially in the stations.

[Edited 2008-10-27 06:54:20]


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User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 5719 times:

It does have its issues, but overall it is one of the best subway systems in the world. They have made a good amount of progress in cleaning up the subway-much cleaner than in the past.


"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4869 posts, RR: 16
Reply 8, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5694 times:

As a straphanger from the 70's I'm really impressed with how it's improved. The frequency of service is amazing (as good as London's), it's round the clock, and the cars are all air-conditioned. The trains hardly break down, so the MTA does a great job of maintenance.

Not so great are the platforms it can get really hot or cold depending on time of year; signage not up to date (no arrival estimates on platform) and hygiene ( my fellow NY'ers fault.)

Overall a great system, does the job. Could be better, but then we'd have to charge London fares.



User currently offlineHOONS90 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 2947 posts, RR: 53
Reply 9, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5685 times:
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Quoting Comorin (Reply 8):
signage not up to date (no arrival estimates on platform)

The L train (Canarsie Line) currently has arrival time information on electronic displays, and the 7 train is bound to get them soon once the Communication-based train control system is implemented.

I noticed that many of the major stations, such as Chambers Street, 14th Street-Union Square, Times Square-42nd Street and Queensboro Plaza etc. have announcements that the next train is at the previous station.



The biggest mistake made by most human beings: Listening to only half, understanding just a quarter and telling double.
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5676 times:



Quoting JFK69 (Reply 3):

Its hot as hell during the summer, its frezing during the winter, You sit next to everything from Stockbrokers to drug dealers.....As a born and bred New Yorker, there is Nothing better!!!!

If I may say that's most of NYC (or at least Manhattan) about two weeks ago -- I was in the general area and decided spur of the moment to take a train into Grand Central Terminal and spent the afternoon wandering around Manhattan -- no maps, no plans, no nothing. And it was one of the best afternoons of my life. All of the people, all of the energy, people who looked homeless next to people in suits that cost more than I make in a month. And everyone moved -quickly- and decisively... Wow.

Even found a place that is the definition of "Hole in the Wall" called simply "Burger Joint" and it was exactly the same -- the guy across from me was very well dressed, the guy next to me was a beat cop, across the way at a table there was someone who looked a little grubby.



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User currently offlinePs76 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5667 times:

Hi,

I remember the Subway from a summer working in NY (upstate NY) in 1999. From what I remember was very convenient (and much less deep than some London subways which made it generally quicker to access etc.).

I used to take it from the Upper West side to I think the stop near Madison Square Garden for work (I used to work at HMV if it's still there!). Also used to work in Tuxedo NY which I got to by either the PATH train to Hoboken then the overland train to Tuxedo via Sloatsberg or by bus direct from the Port Authority Bus Stop.

Looking back was kinda a crazy time in my life but definitely found travelling via subway or train or bus generally very nice at the time. Also one time I was on the subway reading "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenence" (I never even got half way through!) and this guy came up to me telling me what a cool and important book it was etc. (definitely something that probably wouldn't happen in London without the whole carriage staring!).

P.


User currently offlineTWFirst From Vatican City, joined Apr 2000, 6346 posts, RR: 52
Reply 12, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5656 times:



Quoting STT757 (Reply 6):
he best system is the PATH, it's way cleaner than the Subway especially in the stations.

Ugh.... the PATH is ridiculously slow... and whatever the unseen mold is that grows exclusively in the PATH tunnels makes me nauseous.

RE: NY Subway system... I'll say this about it... it's fascinating. I LOVE LOVE LOVE not owning a car!! What's fascinating to me is it's cobbled together from 3 different systems, one of which (IRT or Red/Green/Purple lines) has cars and stations of a completely different scale than the rest of the system. That's why transferring between IRT lines at stations where they intersect with the rest of the system (BMT & IND) is not very intuitive.

It's an extremely interesting experience to ride the system at 4 am - I highly recommend y'all do it once!  Smile

One time I passed out on the A train and woke up at the end of the line in the Rockaways! THEN... I passed out again on the way back towards Manhattan and woke up on the Upper West Side.... and I was just trying to go 4 stops!



An unexamined life isn't worth living.
User currently offlineGreggarious From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 361 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 5625 times:



Quoting TWFirst (Reply 12):
It's an extremely interesting experience to ride the system at 4 am - I highly recommend y'all do it once!  

Ha ha ha, my most memorable late night subway moment was this one night earlier this year where a couple of friends and I went to Carroll Gardens for a birthday party. By 3 AM or so everyone was starting to clear out. We had to take the F to connect to the A to get back to Manhattan (we lived by the South Street Seaport at the time). Well, I was relatively sober, but the other two were gone... anyways, we get to the station right as the train pulls in. They got in without a problem, but my MetroCard didn't swipe the first time and the train left without me. I was like, "Oh no! They're too drunk to switch to the A!" So I ran out of the station and flat out sprinted like twelve blocks north to the Jay St. station. Turns out they got out and onto the waiting A train without a problem and were waiting for me. My roommate/best friend started hugging me incoherently and then promptly threw up.  Silly

I LOVE the subway. I mean, it runs 24 hours a day (I don't think any other major system can say the same, if I remember correctly). There's the random people you meet, it's fast, the express vs. local part, everything about it I can't get enough of. Unless I'm walking, it's easily my favorite way to get around New York... of course, I'm not loaded, so I can't drive here!

NYU is starting a bike sharing program within the next month or two, though, so that's going to be really interesting. I really like riding bikes, but it's going to be insane competing with the insane cab drivers for space.


User currently offlineTexan From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 4264 posts, RR: 52
Reply 14, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 5610 times:

I lived in Brooklyn last summer. I love the subway. It allowed me to live away from the noise and insanity of Manhattan, avoid paying Manhattan prices, yet go into any part of Manhattan I wanted to, walk around, do whatever I felt like, and then retreat back into Park Slope. In 3 months, I filled up my gas tank twice...and one of those times was because I had to drive back to Vermont and back! The people are usually nice, the trains (other than the 4) typically run really close to schedule, and the system was really easy to figure out. The only complaint I had was that to get to my work in Queens (out by JFK) or to get to LGA took forever since there was no subway service. Took LIRR out to Jamaica and then the Q6 bus to the JFK service road. Let me tell you: there is nothing like the smell of Jamaica Station at 7:30 am. Fish markets, oil, and other assorted smells that you can't really place (or just don't want to). And getting to LGA on public transit required taking the Q to Union Square, the 4 to Harlem, and then the Express Bus over to LGA.

All in all, though, it is really easy to use, could take me just about anywhere I wanted to go, and saved me from having to drive in the City (apart from an exciting trip from Park Slope to Penn Station, which I made in 10 minutes by car at 4:45 am to drop someone off for a Jersey Transit train). If all goes according to plan, I'll be moving there for a minimum of three years starting in May 2009. Of course, I could also be heading to Dallas, Denver, or Seattle...

Texan



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User currently onlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 3808 posts, RR: 28
Reply 15, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5591 times:



Quoting HOONS90 (Thread starter):
So, how are your experiences using the NYC subway system, and would you consider it to be your most preferred method of getting around in NYC?



Quoting JFK69 (Reply 3):
Its hot as hell during the summer

Correct. This summer was brutal - NY is already hot and humid as hell as it is and the subway stations are always at least 5ºC hotter.

Quoting JFK69 (Reply 3):
its frezing during the winter

Haven't experienced it but I can oly dread it.

Quoting JFK69 (Reply 3):
You sit next to everything from Stockbrokers to drug dealers.....

Correct, and that is reflected on the ads - on-line stock brokerage ads side-by-side with ads for methadon clinics.

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 10):
Even found a place that is the definition of "Hole in the Wall" called simply "Burger Joint" and it was exactly the same

In the lobby of the "Parker Meridien" hotel, right? My first time in NY somebody took me there and it was amazing, I have been trying to find that place again for ages but haven't quite managed to.



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User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 16, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5580 times:



Quoting Pyrex (Reply 15):
In the lobby of the "Parker Meridien" hotel, right? My first time in NY somebody took me there and it was amazing, I have been trying to find that place again for ages but haven't quite managed to

"Le" Parker Meridien to be technically correct, yup-- West 57th between 6th and 7th Ave. (actually it's easier to find if you enter from W. 56th). Hidden under a cheeseball neon hamburger behind a curtain... A friend told me about it, but I had to ask one of the concierges to actually find it when I was in the lobby (it's just to the side of the checkin desk)



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User currently offlineN229NW From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 1914 posts, RR: 32
Reply 17, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 5517 times:

Ha ha that's funny, I was just about to start a thread called "The New York Subway is a pitiful disgrace"

So I can vent here instead of ranting in my own thread.

I love not having a car too, but I can say that not having a car in NYC is significantly harder than not having a car in Boston, London, Paris, Prague, Berlin and a lot of other cities.

Quoting DesertJets (Reply 5):
The first and probably most serious, is an aging infrastructure. Those really nasty years in the 70s and 80s when NYC was practically bankrupt certainly has had its toll on the system. I cannot imagine how many millions, perhaps billions, of dollars in deferred maintenance exists in the system.

 checkmark 

But equally problematic was the fact that the system was designed poorly. No other system has so many separate, busy lines merging in and out of the same tracks. This is not usually a large problem in Manhattan, since the most investment has been put into making it work there, but, for example, in Queens, the queens boulevard lines--especially the E--regularly sit in the tunnel for several minutes or more at a time waiting for traffic to clear and merge ahead. One slightly delayed train has a knock on effect on many other lines because of this. In general, the E train is a piece of crap, lovingly gilded with lark's vomit.

Quoting DesertJets (Reply 5):
Second it is horribly Manhattan-centric... even then much more so on Lower and Midtown. Granted the majority of the wealth and the major employment centers are there but still. Even within Manhattan there are notable gaps, which the new 2nd Ave subway (finally being built after being proposed for the better part of a century) will help to alleviate

Yup. The G train is nice, but they treat it as really low priority...A Queens Bronx train would also be nice...then again, a crosstown train in Uptown Manhattan is also a major lacuna in the design.

Quoting Comorin (Reply 8):
The frequency of service is amazing (as good as London's)

Are you kidding me? I have often waited almost 10 minutes for a 4 train AT RUSH HOUR. It's nice to know they are building the second avenue subway (but I wouldn't hold my breath because the last several times this has been planned it has fallen through due to economic crises, and lo and behold, we are entering one now, and the MTA is already talking about reducing service and/or raising fares...) But I digress, I was saying: it is nice to know that the 2nd Ave. Subway is being built, but I do laugh at the idea that it is partly "to alleviate overcrowding on the Lexington Avenue line." Here's an amazing way they might alleviate that overcrowding long before they eventually perhaps open the second avenue subway: RUN MORE TRAINS!!!

Anyway, the London Underground has many problems, but its frequency of service, both at Rush hour and off hours probably averages over twice as many trains per hour on many lines both at rush hour and off-peak. Example: the Piccadilly line runs about every 2 minutes at rush hour and 3-4 minutes (max!) off peak, even late at night. Most NY lines run about every 5 minutes at rush hours, and 8-10 minutes off-peak. Meanwhile, several Paris metro lines can operate at 90 second headways during rush hours. The Berlin U-Bahn runs much less frequently (5 mins rush hour, 10 mins off-peak) but in that case the system is significantly less crowded, and the trains run efficiently and flawlessly on time when they do come. These systems are basically the same age as NY, but have not suffered from chronic underinvestment and general managerial apathy. That's why they have so many technological advances that leave NY in the dirt: trains that are one long articulated unit joined inside, single axle bogies to get rid of screeching on curves, etc.

Quoting DesertJets (Reply 5):
Forth, accessibility is a huge issue. It would cost billions of dollars to bring the stations up to a reasonable standard of access. Not to mention make them larger for the current and projected traffic numbers and make them safer.

But it woudln't cost them nearly so much to at least fix the service gates so that strollers and suitcases could go through without having to get the attention of a usually surly employee and swipe a card and turn a turnstile first--not to mention exiting without a siren going off. Touchless entry cards would help alleviate crowding at the turnstiles in general...but of course would cost a good deal more to implement.

Well, I'm done ranting for now...



It's people like you what cause unrest!
User currently offlineHOONS90 From Canada, joined Aug 2001, 2947 posts, RR: 53
Reply 18, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 5505 times:
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The Lexington Avenue Line is definitely overcrowded, but there really isn't any way to decrease headways, as CBTC (Communication-Based Train Control) isn't implemented on that line yet, thus requiring a buffer so that trains do not collide. Furthermore, another reason for the crowding may be because the R62, R142 and R142A trains that are used on the Lexington Avenue Line are narrower and shorter than the ones that run on the lettered lines. Other trains cannot fit into those IRT tunnels. IMO it still beats the horrible traffic on Lexington and Park Avenue. The M101, M102, M15 bus etc. is an absolute pain to use.

Sure, operational irregularities do occur on a daily basis, but the punctuality has substantially increased over the past few years with the introduction of newer, more dependable rolling stock such as the R142A, and increased funding increased the MDBF (mean distance between failures) of the other existing rolling stock. Some reasons that actually contribute to delays are door-holders (I've been on a 2 train once when the door reopened and closed approximately 12 times at Times Square--42nd Street Station, because people kept trying to get on when the doors were closing).

Some of the unreliable routes that I've noticed are the F and R Trains, as well as the 1 Train at times. I haven't had any problems with the E Train so far. The L is at or beyond capacity, but IIRC the headways cannot be increased even with CBTC, because the R143 and R160 sets that can run on CBTC exist in limited numbers, and even then Canarsie Yard also has limited space.

One major peeve of mine is when the express train have to run local on weekends due to construction. However, I guess it's necessary in such an old system that runs 24 hours a day.

In the grand scheme of things, I think it's a very useful way of getting around in NYC, and think that it's better than getting around by other means. It certainly has gotten me around the places I needed to go, in a swift manner, except during construction.

[Edited 2008-10-27 20:17:46]

[Edited 2008-10-27 20:18:28]


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User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 5486 times:

One of the things that you have to consider is that NYC did a GREAT job of merging three competing entities into one operation. One must remember that all of the subways (excepting modern construction and the IND) were constructed privately to compete with the existing street railways and each other. Those companies were the Brooklyn Metropolitan Transit and the Interborough Rapid Transit, and they were fierce competitors. They played all the usual tricks to maximize traffic and profit-drawing maps that showed their lines as more direct than the competition (if they showed a competitor's lines at all), attempting to differentiate their line's operations from the competition. The IRT's stations had ornamentation that did not appear in either the BMT or IND stations.

I must also say that the MTA has done a great job of preserving the history of the subways while making them ready to meet the city's future needs. The MTA does fund a small transit museum that maintains a fleet of historic subway cars. The cars are available for viewing in the old Court Street Station, home of the MTA Transit Museum and one of two locations at which rotating exhibits are displayed-the other is a gallery in Grand Central Terminal. The subway trains are maintained in operating condition and occasionally venture out on the line for fan trips or MTA sanctioned special events-Breast Cancer Awareness being one such event that they will run trains for. Great way to appreciate those rare trains for what they are and a great way to connect with one's past.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12163 posts, RR: 36
Reply 20, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 5479 times:
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On Saturday January 12th, 2008 nearly 2,000 people took off their pants on subways in 10 cities around the world. In New York’s 7th Annual No Pants! Subway Ride we had around 900 participants, spread out over three subway lines. Enjoy the videos first and then go behind the scenes with our mission report and photos.



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User currently offline767Lover From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 5469 times:

I found the system to be efficient and easy to navigate---but the underground stations are stiflingly hot. They need to do something about the ventilation.

User currently offlineCadet985 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 1513 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 5464 times:



Quoting 57AZ (Reply 19):
The MTA does fund a small transit museum that maintains a fleet of historic subway cars. The cars are available for viewing in the old Court Street Station, home of the MTA Transit Museum and one of two locations at which rotating exhibits are displayed-the other is a gallery in Grand Central Terminal.

This is a must see for any subway buff or just anyone with some time to kill. It's only $5 to get into, and they have a nice gift shop.

As someone who rode the subway off and on for 5 years, accessibility is a huge issue. Many stations are not ADA compliant (E. Tremont Street in the Bronx comes to mind).

Something else I'd like to see done is installation of call boxes in all cars. Right now, only the newer cars have emergency call boxes to get in touch with the operator or conductor. This means if I see someone having a heart attack, etc., I have to either walk through a crowded train to get to one of them, or get off at a station, and hope to get their attention before the train leaves.

I had heard rumors of the MTA doing something like what the WMATA in DC has done - contracting for cell coverage in the tunnels. This would be a good safety feature, and a convenience feature.

Marc


User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 5446 times:



Quoting Cadet985 (Reply 22):
This is a must see for any subway buff or just anyone with some time to kill. It's only $5 to get into, and they have a nice gift shop.

It's also educational in a painless way. I am involved in the railway preservation field and was very impressed with their small operation. Definitely an interesting re-use of an old subway station and a fitting way to present the vintage trains. Much more dramatic to present them as one would have seen them in daily use-in the tunnels-rather than in a sterile museum setting.

Their gift shop is very well designed and targeted, carrying only MTA or historic IRT/BMT/IND related items. They have a decent range of products from the trinkets that appeal to most visitors on up to air brake gauges, strap handles and fare boxes-high end items that really only appeal to transit enthusiasts. Selling parts off of retired cars is an interesting concept-giving enthusiasts a legal avenue to obtain those items and bringing in some additional revenue from pieces that would otherwise go in a scrap bin.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineN229NW From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 1914 posts, RR: 32
Reply 24, posted (5 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 5367 times:



Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 18):
The Lexington Avenue Line is definitely overcrowded, but there really isn't any way to decrease headways, as CBTC (Communication-Based Train Control) isn't implemented on that line yet,

Yes, but the point is that other systems installed better signalling to decrease headways long ago, and retrofitted older trains with compliant technology. I understand money was the issue in NY, but I suppose that is half of where my complaints lie. For one of the world's busiest subway systems--on which a lot of the city's and region's economy depends, there needs (but especially needED) to be more investment...

Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 18):
Some reasons that actually contribute to delays are door-holders (I've been on a 2 train once when the door reopened and closed approximately 12 times at Times Square--42nd Street Station, because people kept trying to get on when the doors were closing).

Here's another simple, inexpensive thing that would make a HUGE difference: have a uniform warning system that the doors are closing. For example, a bleep that sounds consistently 3 seconds before the doors will close, etc. Right now, there are announcements to "stand clear of the closing doors" but half the time those announcements are made right after the doors have opened, when people are still exiting and everyone on the crowded platform is still waiting to enter. Then the doors shut unpredictably 20 seconds later. There is a pinging noise as the doors close, but this is too late, often sounding after the doors are already closing or closed.

I hope (but don't believe) that the new 2nd ave line will be built with platform edge sliding doors...

Quoting 57AZ (Reply 19):
One of the things that you have to consider is that NYC did a GREAT job of merging three competing entities into one operation.

True, and the system has definitely improved since the 70s!

Quoting Cadet985 (Reply 22):
This is a must see for any subway buff or just anyone with some time to kill. It's only $5 to get into, and they have a nice gift shop.

It is great.

Quoting HOONS90 (Reply 18):
Some of the unreliable routes that I've noticed are the F and R Trains

Funny, I find the R reliable (although at off-peak times the 10 minute headways annoy me), but it seems to come down to the fact that any route that merges into or out of the IND Queens Boulevard lines is subject to delays. Especially since over the last months they have been making frequent, unpredictable, and unannounced repairs...



It's people like you what cause unrest!
25 Cadet57 : So that explains why I always had service on the Metro...
26 Comorin : I'll defer to your greater knowledge, but the trains run practically back to back for me - #6 train at 77th St Btw, overcrowding also leads to longer
27 Cadet985 : That is the most asinine thing I have ever heard. NYC and cheap are two things that do not go together. Maybe someone who lists their occupation as a
28 Superfly : New York subways are wonderful. Gosh I wish our system here in San Francisco was as good as the New York or Chicago subways. The subway is my preferre
29 IH8BY : I found it a bit intimidating compared to the London Underground, possibly partly due to the dilapidated appearance of some of the stations. The swipe
30 DocLightning : So I lived in New York for three years. I *HATED* the NYC subway. Oh at first when you move there it's this really neat toy and you can ride on these
31 767Lover : I have to disagree with you about London having stellar service in regards to trains. On a 3-day visit in 2006, we encountered at least five instance
32 DocLightning : Oh that happens in New York ALL the time. I'll never forget the time the train pulled into the station, came to a stop, sat there for 5 minutes with
33 N229NW : Of course, it is the train air conditioning that is pumping all that hot air out into the stations to begin with...but I still love the relief you fe
34 HOONS90 : Although I agree that the Bronx isn't all that well served by the subway when you want to go across it, the new Bx12 Select Bus Service (almost like B
35 DocLightning : Oh after my sewage experience I disagree with that strenuously.
36 Columba : I would love the have a model of a NY Subway train or a NJ transit train for my room, do you know where I can buy them online ?
37 Comorin : I've been a college student, grad, lived on very tight budgets in NYC and I know what it's like. My point is that when you start providing services w
38 767Lover : Are you sure that wasn't the Flushing line?
39 Mir : The subway is a microcosm of the city, and for that I love it. I've also never had problems with frequency on the Lexington line at rush hour. 86th a
40 STT757 : The Washington Metro is a great system, the stations are huge. The access to DCA is how all transit - airport links should be designed, hopefully the
41 TylerDurden : I get a hire car with a driver. Taxis are nasty...subway is too crowded...and I'd rather not walk unless it's a few blocks away. At least if you're s
42 N229NW : Yeah, maybe it is just theme decor!!!
43 Tommy767 : Based on the picture, it looks like its a bunch of manhattan/brooklyn hipsters who are trying to create a new holiday -- YAWN. I was just riding this
44 N229NW : Not that rare. They are still pretty common on the B. I really like those trains. They had some style, and they bring back memories of riding the IND
45 Bongodog1964 : On our visit to new York, we found the following comparisons to the London Underground Access: In London we are used to a distinctive illuminated sign
46 Superfly : You haven't really experienced New York unless you ride the subways.
47 DocLightning : There was a delay of about a year to get the first R-160's delivered. They were JUST getting to a point where you actually had some chance of riding
48 Post contains links STT757 : The Port Authority is spending $3 Billion on the new PA-5 cars, they are in testing and should start to be introduced next year. http://photos.nj.com
49 HOONS90 : I'm also fond of those trains. I was quite disappointed that all of the trains that I saw on the B service on Friday were R68s. Agreed. Maybe London
50 Cadet985 : I was not calling anybody asinine. I used that to describe your notion that the fare should be raised. I take it as a compliment, you comparing me to
51 Tommy767 : " target=_blank>http://photos.nj.com/photogallery/20....html Good to know. Thanks for the link.
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