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Only In America  
User currently offlineMike89406 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1460 posts, RR: 3
Posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2120 times:

Where else can you find a American flag, Confederate flag and a Obama sign on the same yard?

Check out the picture

http://www.reporter-times.com/stories/2008/10/30/news.nw-384922.sto

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineUAL757 From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 806 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2106 times:

Okay this is kinda weird...

but I am proud to be an American, and I love my country! People in this country don't realize how good it is...

 wave 


User currently offlineHowSwedeitis From Sweden, joined Jul 2007, 586 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2070 times:
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Quoting Mike89406 (Thread starter):
a American flag, Confederate flag and a Obama sign on the same yard?

Ah, the giant melting pot that is the USA. While I don't think there is a "Best" country, I do have to say that the USA is one kick ass one!  Wink

-HSII



Heja Sverige!!
User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2061 times:



Quoting HowSwedeitis (Reply 2):
While I don't think there is a "Best" country

...sure there is, just that "best" is a relative term.

What's "best" for RuPaul, might not be "best" for Ramsi al daHadi, or might not be "best" for William Ayers, might not be "best" for XXXXXX.


User currently offlineFruteBrute From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1947 times:



Quoting UAL757 (Reply 1):
but I am proud to be an American, and I love my country!

May I ask what part you played in selecting which country you live in and or were born a citizen of?


User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 31
Reply 5, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1876 times:



Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 4):
May I ask what part you played in selecting which country you live in and or were born a citizen of?

May I ask you what gives you the right to question one's love for their country?  sarcastic 



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineFruteBrute From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1868 times:

Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 6):
May I ask you what gives you the right to question one's love for their country?   

I did no such thing. Perhaps you shouldn't leap to conclusions? I was curious to this line of reasoning and merely asked a follow up question.

[Edited 2008-11-02 07:53:43]

User currently offlineExFATboy From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2974 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1858 times:

That picture is hilarious! I have to give credit to that couple for not letting what's obviously something of a political divide not interfere with their relationship. Although I have trouble as an American with the display of the flag of the Confederacy in general.

Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 4):
May I ask what part you played in selecting which country you live in and or were born a citizen of?

A fair point, but he could emigrate if he didn't feel positively about his country. He may not have chosen to initially be an American, but chooses to remain one.


User currently offlineCanuckpaxguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (5 years 9 months 1 day ago) and read 1838 times:

I'm quite proud of my country and am very proud to be Canadian.
I consider myself very lucky to live in, and have been born in, the best country in the world.

I obviously disagree with UAL757 about the best country in the world ... but there's no point in arguing it. We both know how lucky we are to be able to say such a thing about our country, and that's what's important.

G


User currently offlineUAL757 From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 806 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (5 years 9 months 23 hours ago) and read 1789 times:



Quoting UAL757 (Reply 1):

I'm just a happy and proud American that's all...


User currently offlineSuperfly From Thailand, joined May 2000, 39706 posts, RR: 75
Reply 10, posted (5 years 9 months 22 hours ago) and read 1778 times:

This is a bizarre story. They sound like a very odd couple.
It's interesting this is happening in Martinsville, Indiana. A city notoriously known for it's Ku Klutz Klan activity in the past.

http://scican3.scican.net/MAPH/MAPHch13.html



Bring back the Concorde
User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (5 years 9 months 19 hours ago) and read 1689 times:



Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 4):

Quoting UAL757 (Reply 1):
but I am proud to be an American, and I love my country!

May I ask what part you played in selecting which country you live in and or were born a citizen of?

May I ask what that has to do with anything?

One can be proud to be tall, male, hazel-eyed, well-endowed, able-bodied, intelligent, born to a notable family, able to eat anything you want and not get fat, or any such opposing combo in between..... but what part do "you" play in any of that?

 Yeah sure


User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7642 posts, RR: 36
Reply 12, posted (5 years 9 months 15 hours ago) and read 1638 times:

Quoting ConcordeBoy (Reply 11):
May I ask what that has to do with anything?

It was a simple and fair question ....  

Quoting Canuckpaxguy (Reply 8):

I'm quite proud of my country and am very proud to be Canadian.

Even though Canada has its many quirks, I wouldn't give it up for anything.

As far as the picture in the OP goes, I've never understood showing patriosim myself. Not that I think theres anything wrong with it, I just find that I don't feel the need to show my support for many things.

[Edited 2008-11-02 17:50:56]


A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
User currently offlineFruteBrute From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (5 years 9 months 15 hours ago) and read 1635 times:



Quoting ConcordeBoy (Reply 11):
May I ask what that has to do with anything?

One can be proud to be tall, male, hazel-eyed, well-endowed, able-bodied, intelligent, born to a notable family, able to eat anything you want and not get fat, or any such opposing combo in between..... but what part do "you" play in any of that?

This is called a message board or forum. By definition a forum is:

1 a: the marketplace or public place of an ancient Roman city forming the center of judicial and public business b: a public meeting place for open discussion c: a medium (as a newspaper or online service) of open discussion or expression of ideas

I'm expressing my thoughts, ideas, and interacting with others. Therefore, I "play a part" just as everyone else does here in discussing matters. So touchy aren't we? Of course your reaction is typical of what I see when I've asked others questions of a similar ilk, in real life. I call that bumper sticker patriotism. Are Frenchman "proud" to be French? Are Spainards proud to be Spanish? Are Aussies proud to be Australian? Yup, almost always. Since none of us have a choice to be born in any particular country, why should simply being spawned or birthed in a country make one "proud"?

If one hasn't the choice to live where they live, and haven't traveled anywhere in the world, what makes any think they can make an objective decision on how "good or bad" one's country is to live in? Sorry but bumper sticker patriotism is the kool-aid to sate the masses to look the other way while a government does something fundamentally unpatriotic, ala the Iraq War, Guantanamo Detention Camp, or torturing in the name of the United States.


User currently offlineExFATboy From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2974 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (5 years 9 months 15 hours ago) and read 1624 times:



Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 13):
Sorry but bumper sticker patriotism is the kool-aid to sate the masses to look the other way while a government does something fundamentally unpatriotic

A fair point - Americans sometimes forget the full quote of "my country, right or wrong" - it's "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right."

Of course, not all of us agree on whether we're "right or wrong" and need "set right"ting, but that's what we have discussion boards, elections, and a free press for. And why people in the South can display the flag of the Confederacy, even though the vast majority of Americans do consider it a symbol of racism.


User currently offlineFruteBrute From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (5 years 9 months 14 hours ago) and read 1585 times:



Quoting ExFATboy (Reply 14):
Of course, not all of us agree on whether we're "right or wrong" and need "set right"ting, but that's what we have discussion boards, elections, and a free press for. And why people in the South can display the flag of the Confederacy, even though the vast majority of Americans do consider it a symbol of racism.

Exactly! Just because one person points out a fault or shortcoming of one's own country doesn't make them "unpatriotic" or "anti-American", but rather someone that fights for what they believe their country should represent. Sadly, somehow that got lost along the way these past 8 years. Any dissention by anyone has been beat down as "angry", or "haters" or "anti-American".

It's this behavior and arrogance that on Tuesday will finally throw all the bums out of office, and make a change.

I love my country, but I am tired of trying to defend the indefensible when I travel the globe. I'm sick to death of bumper sticker patriotism that means nothing except a cheap punch line. The minions of neo-conservatism are in for a rude awakening come Tuesday.


User currently offlineIAirAllie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (5 years 9 months 10 hours ago) and read 1546 times:



Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 4):
May I ask what part you played in selecting which country you live in and or were born a citizen of?

What does that have to do with the thread or his post?

Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 6):
I did no such thing.

I beg to differ that is EXACTLY what you did. I don't dispute your right to do that but have the balls to own it if you do.

Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 13):
If one hasn't the choice to live where they live, and haven't traveled anywhere in the world, what makes any think they can make an objective decision on how "good or bad" one's country is to live in?

Well I for one am immensely proud of my CHOSEN country. I am an immigrant. I chose as an adult to become a citizen of the United States. People do have a choice in where they live and in their citizenship. I have traveled extensively, I have lived outside of the US and I know without a doubt that the US is worthy of my pride. The immigration statistics back up my belief that this nation is special. My pride is not bumper sticker pride there is substance to what I feel and I take offense at your elitist attitude.


User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8023 posts, RR: 26
Reply 17, posted (5 years 9 months 9 hours ago) and read 1510 times:



Quoting ConcordeBoy (Reply 3):
...sure there is, just that "best" is a relative term.

There's no "best" country, period. The quality of life in the developed world in general is more or less the same. There are only countries that suck and countries people of means and opportunity otherwise choose to live in. The rest people are unlucky to be born into but alas, it
s still possible to be proud of a sucky country provided one hails from it. That's what's relative.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineACDC8 From Canada, joined Mar 2005, 7642 posts, RR: 36
Reply 18, posted (5 years 9 months 8 hours ago) and read 1499 times:



Quoting IAirAllie (Reply 16):
Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 6):
I did no such thing.

I beg to differ that is EXACTLY what you did.

No he didn't, he asked ....

Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 4):
May I ask what part you played in selecting which country you live in and or were born a citizen of?



Quoting FruteBrute (Reply 4):
May I ask what part you played in selecting which country you live in and or were born a citizen of?

Why did he choose to live where he was? Pretty simple question really.



A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
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