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Cracked Laptop LCD... Advice  
User currently offlineEbs757 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 758 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2087 times:

well today I went to open up my laptop, doing so, gripped to hard I guess and cracked the screen and now i'm stuck with a 2 1/2 inch white stripe down the near middle of the screen. It is a Dell Inspiron E1505 and about 2 years old so I'm not that terribly upset. I was looking around on ebay for replacement LCD's for this model and they run less than 100 bucks but, I'm debating wether or not just getting an external screen as it has always bugged me having a smaller laptop screen with a high res. What should I do?


Viva la Vida
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7571 posts, RR: 32
Reply 1, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2064 times:

We used to replace about 100 screens a year in the company I work for - never had any real problems with replacing them. The trickiest part was always getting the case open in a manner so that it could be closed properly again.

You can have better resolution at little more cost with a new LCD monitor. A new monitor vs a used LCD screen removed by a person with unknown skills. But if you need the mobility.

Personally I'd consider a broken screen 2 year old laptop as junk to be replaced soon.


User currently offlineLASOctoberB6 From Japan, joined Nov 2006, 2380 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 2003 times:



Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 1):
Personally I'd consider a broken screen 2 year old laptop as junk to be replaced soon.

Well, I guess a nearly 4 year old HP ZE4933 laptop is junk.. Yay! Time to get a new laptop!  Smile



[NOT IN SERVICE] {WEStJet}
User currently offlineEbs757 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 758 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 1999 times:



Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 1):

I'm pretty good with computers actually. I've replaced Hard drives, Ram, keyboards I think an LCD should be fine. I was looking at the screens on ebay for my model and nearly all of them are res 1280. I purchased the laptop with an up too 1680 resolution and on other sites is close to 400 dollars... so I think I'm going to go with the external LCD



Viva la Vida
User currently offlineMham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3565 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 1990 times:



Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 1):
Personally I'd consider a broken screen 2 year old laptop as junk to be replaced soon.

What does one do on a new laptop that you can't do on a 2 year old laptop?

Maybe I'm jaded, but my 6 year old Thinkpad does everything I want it to except play cool games, but a new one wouldn't do that either.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7688 posts, RR: 21
Reply 5, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1959 times:
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Quoting Mham001 (Reply 4):
What does one do on a new laptop that you can't do on a 2 year old laptop?

Comfortably work with the newest and most up to date applications and materials out there that use a correspondingly large level of system resources, and cope with technological developments for the next few years.

Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 1):
Personally I'd consider a broken screen 2 year old laptop as junk to be replaced soon.

I wouldn't say it is total junk, but I would indeed be inclined to buy a new one. For the amount of hassle involved in replacing the screen, and given the fact that it is already a couple of years old, getting a reasonable new laptop seems like a good option. They are much cheaper than they used to be and it is not necessarily a prohibitively expensive option.

Also, you can still keep the old one and plug it into an external monitor, just keep it like a second desktop computer for storage, watching films etc.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8502 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1933 times:



Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 1):
Personally I'd consider a broken screen 2 year old laptop as junk to be replaced soon.

Well, if you have the money to replace it, otherwise you have to make do.

Quoting Ebs757 (Reply 3):
I purchased the laptop with an up too 1680 resolution and on other sites is close to 400 dollars... so I think I'm going to go with the external LCD

I did the same thing with my laptop, a Dell 8200 that I got in July of 2002 (that I still use). It had a UXGA 1600x1200 resolution screen that cost $400 to replace after I accidentally cracked it. Mine wasn't more than two years old at the time and I considered it to be well worth fixing. But I have a desktop now and I love my 22" LCD.


User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7571 posts, RR: 32
Reply 7, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 1933 times:



Quoting Mham001 (Reply 4):
What does one do on a new laptop that you can't do on a 2 year old laptop?

I wish you could explain that to the executives in my company who always say "I want the newest computer. I know I have to buy out my lease a year early, but I have plenty of money in my cost center to do that."

The stock holder in me screams at the wasted dollars (many types) / yuan / rupee / pounds / euros / etc..

It all depends upon usage, and available funds of course.

Having spent most of my time with IBM, Lenovo, Dell, Compaq, Toshiba laptops in the corporate world over the past 10-15 years, three years is pushing the life of a laptop.

Now those are computers used 2,000-3,000 hours per year.

A personal one, not used much. Might be worth more.

But what I would not do unless there was no other option is put money into fixing a two year old or older computer, especially with used parts.


User currently offlineAverageUser From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1910 times:

You need to check the component (OEM) number that's printed somewhere in the display panel, and search eBay or similar for that number. Typically many manufacturers would have used the same OEM component. Opening the display half of the laptop is usually no major problem.

User currently offlineEbs757 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 758 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 7 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1853 times:

Here is a picture of the damage if anyone is interested. Since then, the entire right of the block is rainbow colored and the left side is going also.
http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b287/Eble/LCD%20Crack/100_2276.jpg



Viva la Vida
User currently offlineMham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3565 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (5 years 7 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1822 times:



Quoting RussianJet (Reply 5):
Comfortably work with the newest and most up to date applications and materials out there that use a correspondingly large level of system resources, and cope with technological developments for the next few years.

What applications and materials(?) have come out in the last 2 years that require a larger level of resources? Anything, besides Vista?


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7688 posts, RR: 21
Reply 11, posted (5 years 7 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1818 times:
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Quoting Mham001 (Reply 10):
What applications and materials(?) have come out in the last 2 years that require a larger level of resources? Anything, besides Vista?

Well obviously that, but I'll be honest and say that I cannot name others of the top of my head. However, software is constantly being developed and released and the point I was really trying to make is that newer computers have more capacity to easily handle any or indeed many tasks and run quickly and efficiently at the same time. I'm not saying old computers are useless or anything, but it makes sense to have as high a specification as you can. It says it all that since I got my current laptop less than a year ago many new computers have double the RAM and newer, better processors. Mine is still a very good machine, but there has to be a reason why newer, higher specs are being produced.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8502 posts, RR: 12
Reply 12, posted (5 years 7 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1804 times:



Quoting RussianJet (Reply 11):
Well obviously that, but I'll be honest and say that I cannot name others of the top of my head.

Well, I've been playing Mass Effect and flying in X-Plane 9.21 on my desktop, and I couldn't do those with my old laptop, but other than that? Hmmm....my laptop doesn't have a DVD burner and can't read dual-layer or Blu-Ray DVDs. That's a negative, I guess. But it is 6.5 years old.

Pretty sad that Win XP ran fine on 384MB of RAM when I got my laptop and (I upgraded to one gig later) and my desktop has 8GB of RAM and Vista isn't any faster.


User currently offlineMham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3565 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (5 years 7 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1801 times:

My point is that there isn't much that a 2 year computer can't handle that a new one will. Except Vista. They keep coming out with newer, bigger and faster but the applications aren't there that really need all the horsepower available. Particularly for the average Joe. This has been a worry in the industry for some time.

It's very doubtful our original poster will gain much besides a bright shiny new screen and a lighter wallet with a new laptop. Except for Vista and truth be told, I've run it on my 6 year old Thinkpad..

I'm big on using things until it makes no sense to keep them running or there is an overwhelming need to upgrade. Better value and its the 'green' thing to do too.


User currently offlineMham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3565 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (5 years 7 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1796 times:

My point is that there isn't much that a 2 year computer can't handle that a new one will. Except Vista. They keep coming out with newer, bigger and faster but the applications aren't there that really need all the horsepower available. Particularly for the average Joe. This has been a worry in the industry for some time.

It's very doubtful our original poster will gain much besides a bright shiny new screen and a lighter wallet with a new laptop. Except for Vista and truth be told, I've run it on my 6 year old Thinkpad..

I'm big on using things until it makes no sense to keep them running or there is an overwhelming need to upgrade. Better value and its the 'green' thing to do too.


User currently offlineEbs757 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 758 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 7 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1787 times:

Since the replacement for it is around 400 bucks (1680res) I've decided its pointless to replace with that high of quality screen. There are tons of 1280res screens on ebay for like 100 bucks so definitely going to pick up one of those. I also will want that high resolution for the games I play so will most likely pick up an external display with somewhere in the range of 1400res range. Buying both will keep me well under 400 bucks and better decision for the life span of the laptop


Viva la Vida
User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2990 posts, RR: 37
Reply 16, posted (5 years 7 months 4 hours ago) and read 1653 times:
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Just make sure the screen you are going to buy is compatible with your laptop, they aren't all, even if they are the same size.

Replacing screens isn't difficult, but take your time. Dell is actually good in that they post instructions for most models on their website.

From my experience with Dells, lay the screen back all the way (flat in other words if you can), then you have to pop the backplate above the keyboard (probably from the left, twisting slightly as you move to the right), then pop the hinge covers, carefully pull out the 2 mounting screws next to the hinges, this will release the top part of the laptop, then remove the corner rubber guards and remove the bezel screws under them, then CAREFULLY remove the bezel, which snaps along the sides. Once you have it exposdes, carefully remove the mounting screws along the sides of the screen, lift the old screen carefully, disconnect the LCD from the electronics bundle (i want to call it a modulator, cause thats what it is), and if needed the power supply as well, the screen should now be loose, put it aside safely.

2 notes, the plug you need to pull for the LCD is normally wide and flat and near the TOP of the screen, the circuit board you need to keep so it's not the fat wider plug that attaches to it. Also have the Battery out of the laptop when doing this, not so much for your safety as to keep from accidentally frying something with an errant screw.

Putting in the new screen is the same in reverse basically, just don't overtighten the screws and be careful with the plastic pieces going back in, especially the backplate as if it isn't in right the buttons bind/wont work.

Otherwise, I'm still using a 3 year old Toshiba... works fine for almost everything, even run Vista when i want it too, though it was an upper-level machine at the time with real graphics and 2 GB of RAM. Replaced the screen and HDD (twice grrr, stupid Seagate drive) in it. Everything else works fine.

Also one tip, BEFORE you order a screen, get the Dell part number and google it, there might be a non-dell branded replacement that's identical. For the larger rez screens, Dell tends to use Samsung LCDs, so if you can find it as a generic Samsung it's probably 100 or more cheaper. I've done this for Dell, Compaq and Toshiba, just read everything CAREFULLY before you buy, and if ordering it by mail INSURE THE SHIPMENT!



Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
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