Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Who Do You Think The Future Of The GOP Is?  
User currently offlineUsair320 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 991 posts, RR: 2
Posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 4582 times:

In my personal opinion I'd like to see the Republican Liberty Caucus grow. Many congressional candidates come to mind. Among them are B.J Lawson in NC, State Senator Bob Hedlund (R-MA), along with Ron Paul retaining his seat. As far as 2012 my ideal candidate would be former governor Gary E. Johnson (R-New Mexico). Other unlikely candidates are Sen. chuck Hagel (R-Nebraska) and sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine). I'd love to se Ron Paul run again, but he will be quite old by that time. What's your input?

123 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4559 times:

Personally, I think it needs to reinvent itself and move away from the stuffy, antiquated policies of the GWB era. They could do well to be more modern and contemporary. It might alienate ultra conservatives - but so be it.

By paddling nearer the political mainstream - they may have a chance to win power again.

I hope they aren't reading this - because we need a good 8 year or so break from conservative politics. To quote the lyrics from a well known song - Uncle Sam and John was quite enough...

It's tough to know who might bring them the salvation they seek. Interesting you mention that one of the candidates would be quite old - maybe a younger, fresher mind is needed, bringing fresh/different ideas to solve the difficulties USA faces.


User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13033 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4558 times:

It is hard to say right now, perhaps someone who leads and moves the party to right-center, away from the social-military-fiscal extreme conservatives and encourages some comprimise with the Obama Administration. We do need the Republican party to be a balance and moderator of some of the policies of the Democratic Party. I think from that we will see new, perhaps younger and more moderate leaders develop.

User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8787 posts, RR: 24
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4553 times:



Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 2):
perhaps someone who leads and moves the party to right-center,

Jeez, haven't you guys been paying attention? GWB and his administration HAVE been very centrist - big government bailouts, expansion of medicare, not willing to decrease the size and influence of government on people's lives. The only thing conservative about him has been an agressive foreign policy.

And McCain was more of the same - a centrist with a history of siding with Democrats almost as often as with his own party.

After a few years of Obama, I expect that the economic disaster will be sufficient to insipire another wave of conservatism in the country - another Reagan Revolution to get government back under control.

This weekend I was in a store where I saw an Obama portrait for sale with a quote on the bottom. It said, "Destiny is not made by you, it is written for you", or words to that effect. I was shocked and appalled. I can't recall him ever actually saying that, or if the poster maker was being creative, but if that is the kind of socialistic thinking going on in his head (i.e. "you don't need to do anything, the benevolent state will take care of you") then that is a slap in the face to all Americans who believe in freedom and self-determination. People will eventually reject that.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4550 times:



Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 3):
"Destiny is not made by you, it is written for you",

Here is the correct quote: Our Destiny Is Not Written For Us, But By Us’. Kind of changes the meaning of what you wrote, don't you think?

"I know these are difficult times. I know folks are worried. But I also know that now is not the time for fear or panic. Now is the time for resolve and steady leadership. Because I know we can steer ourselves out of this crisis. This is a nation that has faced down war and depression; great challenges and great threats. We have always seen that mountaintop from the deepest valley. We have always risen to the moment when the moment was hard – and we can do it again. We can restore confidence in our economy and renew that fundamental belief – that here in America, our destiny is not written for us, but by us."


User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined exactly 11 years ago today! , 7405 posts, RR: 50
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 4501 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting Usair320 (Thread starter):
What's your input?

Louisiana Gov Bobby Jindal. Nuff said.



Made from jets!
User currently offlineWunalaYann From Australia, joined Mar 2005, 2839 posts, RR: 25
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 4491 times:



Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 3):
The only thing conservative about him has been an agressive foreign policy.

Actually, if you listen to Ron Paul (probably the only serious conservative out there), an agressive foreign policy is contrary to conservatice values and ideologies.  Smile


User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 960 posts, RR: 51
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 4486 times:

Quoting WunalaYann (Reply 6):
Actually, if you listen to Ron Paul (probably the only serious conservative out there), an agressive foreign policy is contrary to conservatice values and ideologies.

I've never understood why Ron Paul is the "only serious conservative." Because that's what he and calls himself? One man doesn't get to define the values of conservative policy. Aggressive foreign policy has been a part of the Bush, Reagan, and Nixon administrations. Eisenhower was no slouch either. It's not something the latest generation of Bush "neo-cons" decided to concoct.

The GOP will rebound in due time. At the latest my the 2014 midterms.

[Edited 2009-01-19 18:42:53]

User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2745 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 4473 times:



Quoting Usair320 (Thread starter):
As far as 2012 my ideal candidate would be former governor Gary E. Johnson (R-New Mexico).

The GOP would nominate Ted Kennedy before Gary Johnson.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8787 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 4458 times:



Quoting Dtwclipper (Reply 4):
Here is the correct quote: Our Destiny Is Not Written For Us, But By Us’. Kind of changes the meaning of what you wrote, don't you think?

If that is the correct quote, I have no problem with it. But the poster I saw had the exact opposite. I even had a "double-take moment". when I could not believe what I had read, and read it again to make sure.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineJCS17 From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 8065 posts, RR: 39
Reply 10, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 4453 times:



Quoting Usair320 (Thread starter):
In my personal opinion I'd like to see the Republican Liberty Caucus grow. Many congressional candidates come to mind. Among them are B.J Lawson in NC, State Senator Bob Hedlund (R-MA), along with Ron Paul retaining his seat. As far as 2012 my ideal candidate would be former governor Gary E. Johnson (R-New Mexico). Other unlikely candidates are Sen. chuck Hagel (R-Nebraska) and sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine). I'd love to se Ron Paul run again, but he will be quite old by that time. What's your input?

The GOP, as inept as they are, won't make the same mistake twice. You won't see a moderate Republican sniff the nomination for another 10-20 years. We're looking at a Ronald Reagan figure four years from now, against a Jimmy Carter (Obama).

In 2012:
-Romney
-Palin
-Jindal
-Sanford

IMO, we're going to go with a Romney/Palin or Jindal (most likely VP) ticket, and life will be good in 2013.



America's chickens are coming home to rooooost!
User currently offlineN174UA From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 994 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4432 times:

Unless she does a super-star job in Alaska for the next few years, I don't see Gov. Palin back as pursuing national office. Maybe a Senator, but who knows. Should could run against Sen. Lisa Murkowski and win, and that would get her to Washington, maybe to make a run in 2016.

She's up for re-election next year, and if she wants to run for President in 2012, then she would realistically not run for re-election.

I like Romney, but I'd be equally amazed if he's on the ticket.

Watch Tim Pawlenty and Bobby Jindal - could be an interesting pair if they ran together.

2012 depends on how well Obama does. If he crashes and burns, then a Reagan-type figure would win. If Obama is doing well, then they may as well run Palin as a sacrificial lamb, and prepare for 2016.


User currently offlineFlymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7119 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4430 times:



Quoting JCS17 (Reply 10):
IMO, we're going to go with a Romney/Palin or Jindal (most likely VP) ticket, and life will be good in 2013.

Palin is an idiot and does not belong anywhere near Washington.

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 5):
Louisiana Gov Bobby Jindal. Nuff said.

Along with Tim Pawlenty.

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 3):
After a few years of Obama, I expect that the economic disaster will be sufficient to insipire another wave of conservatism in the country - another Reagan Revolution to get government back under control.

Agree with you there. As much as I want to see Obama succeed in this economic crisis I just don’t see it happening. It’s a worldwide problem now.

Expectations are much too high for President Obama (might as well call him president now) he will be able to solve problems but he is not a miracle worker. The general public who knows just about nothing about politics and world affairs expect a new country in 2 years. It looks like some things are only going to get worse before they turn for the better. People need to start understanding this. He is not the controller of the Universe and Time.

Anyway I will be off to watch the ceremonies tomorrow in DC. I am not sure if I am going to stick it with the crowds in the Mall or just take it the easy way and watch it from my Capitol Hill Office but either way we have a historic day ahead of US and I am happy I will have the privilege to be a part of it. (Even though I voted for McCain) In the scheme of world history what seems so simple to many is an amazing sight, seeing Democracy at its best, a peaceful transition of power.



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineABQ747 From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 847 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4425 times:



Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 8):
The GOP would nominate Ted Kennedy before Gary Johnson.

 checkmark  Gary Johnson has no chance of being nominated as long as he supports legalizing marijuana. Steve Pearce and Heather Wilson are much better candidates.



The reason New Mexico is so windy is because Texas sucks and Arizona blows.
User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4418 times:



Quoting JCS17 (Reply 10):
You won't see a moderate Republican sniff the nomination for another 10-20 years.

And that sort of sentiment will keep Republicans of any sort from sniffing the presidency for another 10-20 years. The shifting demographics that got Obama elected aren't going away. The youth vote that went strongly for Kerry and Obama? Quite a lot of them are now lifelong Democrats. Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic group in the country, and they are voting increasingly Democratic. The Mountain West? More and more Democratic. The Upper Midwest? Again, voting ever more Democratic. Unless the Republican party wants to continue its march into irrelevancy as a regional party, they're going to have to reform themselves. I doubt they will do so by 2012, though - it's just too easy to blame failure on the messenger, rather than the message.



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2745 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4418 times:



Quoting ABQ747 (Reply 13):
  Gary Johnson has no chance of being nominated as long as he supports legalizing marijuana. Steve Pearce and Heather Wilson are much better candidates.

I'd personally choose none of the above, but I'm not a Republican either. Johnson also indicated later in his second term that he would lean toward legalization of cocaine, and would give some consideration to legalization of heroin.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlineJpetekyxmd80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 4378 posts, RR: 27
Reply 16, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4410 times:



Quoting JCS17 (Reply 10):
The GOP, as inept as they are, won't make the same mistake twice. You won't see a moderate Republican sniff the nomination for another 10-20 year

Since you say 'mistake', i am curious to see which more conservative candidate you think could've won this election.

Quoting Yellowstone (Reply 14):
The youth vote that went strongly for Kerry and Obama? Quite a lot of them are now lifelong Democrats.

Don't jump the gun based off of 1 election. People were saying the Democrats were done in 2004, saying if they couldn't win then, when could they? Remember, a lot of the 'youth vote' and 'lifelong democrats' of the 60's and 70's turning into the middle aged Republican base? Political affiliations are far from constant, and often fluctuate with age and life experiences. I think it is naive to anoint young voters as lifelong Democrats. All it could take is a Reagan like figure to turn the electoral tide.

Now, I sure as hell hope this Obama Presidency will not lead to something like 1980, but it is a very real possibility considering the long road ahead.



The Best Care in the Air, 1984-2009
User currently offlineElite From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2006, 2793 posts, RR: 10
Reply 17, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4400 times:



Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 5):
Louisiana Gov Bobby Jindal. Nuff said.

Just because he's Indian? I think we've had enough of this "race" thing. The new leader of the GOP is going to be someone who is able to balance traditional conservatives with the newer, slightly more liberal "neo-conservatives". Contrary to what some people believe, I don't think the GOP will try to go the way of finding a non-white or female politician just to win more votes instead of focusing on the actual credentials ... did Sarah Palin not teach us anything?

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 3):
GWB and his administration HAVE been very centrist

Probably more centrist than what people would think, but Dick Cheney was still a major conservative influence on GWB's decisions.


User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 4396 times:



Quoting Jpetekyxmd80 (Reply 16):
Don't jump the gun based off of 1 election. People were saying the Democrats were done in 2004, saying if they couldn't win then, when could they? Remember, a lot of the 'youth vote' and 'lifelong democrats' of the 60's and 70's turning into the middle aged Republican base? Political affiliations are far from constant, and often fluctuate with age and life experiences. I think it is naive to anoint young voters as lifelong Democrats. All it could take is a Reagan like figure to turn the electoral tide.

I agree that we can't take for granted the shift, but the numbers are striking. Young voters went for Obama 2 to 1 over McCain - that's a huge margin. And I think you're wrong with your comment about 2004 - the full view of Bush's incompetence didn't come out until his second term. People were still receptive to the "politics of fear" tactics his campaign was using; I won't say we've moved entirely beyond that, but it would seem people tire of it after a couple of election cycles (2002 and 2004, in this case).

To bring up another point, we've been talking a lot about the presidency, but the Congress also deserves a look - the Republicans are losing several Senators to retirement next cycle, many in "purple" states. The Dems stand to pick up another seat or two there, which should put them over the 60-seat line (whether that's significant is a point for another thread). On the House side, here's a interesting piece by Nate Silver of 538.com:
http://www.fivethirtyeight.com/2008/...ublicans-still-national-party.html
He points out that the Democrats have 126 districts they won by 40 or more points; the Republicans only have 30, 22 of which are in the South. Also, if every Republican House candidate got 5 percent more of the vote in 2010 than in 2008, they'd still only pick up 15 seats. Even if every GOP candidate boosted their share of the vote by 15 percent, the Democrats would still control the House. Doesn't mean that can't change, but it would seem to suggest that the GOP has some work to do if they want to get back in power.



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineElite From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2006, 2793 posts, RR: 10
Reply 19, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 1 day ago) and read 4392 times:



Quoting Jpetekyxmd80 (Reply 16):
Don't jump the gun based off of 1 election.

I agree; the Democrats shouldn't be too excited and the Republicans shouldn't be too sad. Anyone who has taken a look into US politics will know that it is so complex that 1 election really doesn't mean that much in the long run. Ideologies will continue to shift; we don't know what will happen in the future. What if Obama has a terrible first term? This could turn the tide against the Democrats. If you look at the important issues for the past few elections (2008, 2004, 2000) you will see that it is drastically different. For the Republicans to continue to focus on the "race" issue would put them behind and potentially lose them another election. (Like it or not, the race issue was a big factor in the 08 elections... "change", "hope", etc were a part of it but race too).

There is also the consensus of 2010 that has the potential to play a major factor come 2012. Republican stronghold states such as Texas and Utah are set to gain a few electoral votes while Democratic states such as New York and Pennsylvania will continue to lose them. When you look at the big picture and see that only 270 electoral votes are needed to win 2008, these changes can make a big difference.

I think that in 2012 the Republicans will be back and that they will have a strong showing, at least stronger than 2008. There are a few lessons learned; firstly, the Republicans should learn from the disciplined campaign of Barack Obama. It was an impressive campaign that left the McCain camp - who were divided on the choice of Palin - in shock. Secondly, the future does not lie with Sarah Palin. No way.

Remember this: 1 term (4 years) is a long time. By the time it is 2012 the political landscape will be completely different. In 1984, Republican Ronald Reagan won 49 states and 59% of the popular vote; 8 years later, Democrat Bill Clinton won 53% of the popular vote and went on to serve 2 terms. So a strong year doesn't mean anything, and both sides need to know that.


User currently offlineMarSciGuy From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 549 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 4371 times:



Quoting Elite (Reply 19):
see that only 270 electoral votes are needed to win 2008, these changes can make a big difference.

I'm fairly certain the "only" 270 electoral votes have been needed for at least several election cycles, if not decades...

According to the 12th and 23rd amendments and US Law (determining the size of the US House of Reps) the number of Electors is set at the number of US Senators + the number of US Reps + 3 electors from the District of Columbia, which means that the total number of electors is 538.

Source: http://www.archives.gov/federal-regi...ter/electoral-college/faq.html#538

I'm not sure when the last time the US House grew, but the Senate hasn't since Hawaii and Alaska joined the Union in 1959 so I'd hazard a guess it's been at least a couple of decades...



"There weren't a ton of gnats there where a ton of gnats and their families as well!"
User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 4349 times:



Quoting Elite (Reply 19):
There is also the consensus of 2010 that has the potential to play a major factor come 2012. Republican stronghold states such as Texas and Utah are set to gain a few electoral votes while Democratic states such as New York and Pennsylvania will continue to lose them. When you look at the big picture and see that only 270 electoral votes are needed to win 2008, these changes can make a big difference.

True, but those shift of a few EVs into traditionally Republican states is balanced by the fact that states like Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico, Iowa, and Virginia, among others, are moving towards becoming Democratic. I don't think the GOP can win unless they start taking back those states. Also, in the long run, the reason why Southern, Republican stronghold states are gaining EVs is that people are moving out of the North and into the "Sun Belt." Those "immigrants" will take their political views with them, gradually diluting GOP support in the state.



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineJeffSFO From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 836 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 4303 times:



Quoting Yellowstone (Reply 21):


Quoting Elite (Reply 19):
There is also the consensus of 2010 that has the potential to play a major factor come 2012. Republican stronghold states such as Texas and Utah are set to gain a few electoral votes while Democratic states such as New York and Pennsylvania will continue to lose them. When you look at the big picture and see that only 270 electoral votes are needed to win 2008, these changes can make a big difference.

True, but those shift of a few EVs into traditionally Republican states is balanced by the fact that states like Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico, Iowa, and Virginia, among others, are moving towards becoming Democratic. I don't think the GOP can win unless they start taking back those states. Also, in the long run, the reason why Southern, Republican stronghold states are gaining EVs is that people are moving out of the North and into the "Sun Belt." Those "immigrants" will take their political views with them, gradually diluting GOP support in the state.

I agree with Yellowstone on his points. Take a look at the voting trends on the interactive map linked below and you'll see how only 22% of counties in the US voted more Republican in 2008 than 2004 (mostly in the South) while the rest of the country shifted Democratic. If this trend continues the only predominant GOP stronghold will be that pocket of white voters in the South. According to the data provided on the linked page, the surge in younger and minority voters helped tip the scales to Obama:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

If the GOP can't appeal to those groups then they risk getting marginalized in future elections.


User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8787 posts, RR: 24
Reply 23, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 4291 times:



Quoting JeffSFO (Reply 22):
If the GOP can't appeal to those groups then they risk getting marginalized in future elections.

This is the central problem - we have started to see "groups" that need to be "won over". You have all these hyphonated-American groups, gays, atheists, born-agains, enviro-nuts, retirees, etc. etc. etc., and now the common wisdom is that you have to appeal to these groups to win them over. The Democrats have proven expert at this (it's called "divide & conquer"), and the Republicans have been trying to do the same the past few years without success.

I think they should stop trying to win over all these separate groups and go back to treating everyone the same, as Americans. Treating people differently because of their race, status or whatever runs completely against conservative principles.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineJFKMan From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 592 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (5 years 6 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 4290 times:

I think the future of the GOP will be conservative. It will be led by Sarah Palin and Bobby Jindal.


US / AA - JFK / TPA
25 RSWA330 : Why does the GOP have to appeal to "groups?" We are all Americans. I can tell you the first way the GOP can start to heal itself and that is to stop
26 Yellowstone : As the saying goes, America isn't so much a melting pot as a salad bowl. We aren't all the same; we each have different heritages and experiences tha
27 Dougloid : Memo from a liberal democrat. A while ago a lot of people were yapping about the "Republican brand" like it was some kinda beer or underwear or someth
28 Post contains links AGM100 : Darrell Issa ... ? I will be watching this man over the next couple of years , I like what I have seen so far. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darrell_Is
29 Triebwerk : I might be on the liberal side, but I certainly don't want to see the GOP go defunct. The moment one party assumes full control, this country could be
30 FreequentFlier : The people who usually make these proclamations of permanent majorities and other such nonsense are usually party figures or other associated hacks.
31 N867DA : When I used to read political forums I can't tell you how upset I got when posters would back permanent Democratic/Republican rule. We can debate whe
32 A346Dude : Palin was a disaster except among the most right-wing of Republicans. I really don't understand why anyone (except the Democrats) would want to see h
33 Dougloid : Depends purely on whose ox is getting gored. When the Republicans were running things most of them thought a permanent majority a pretty good idea. O
34 RSWA330 : She was a disaster in your opinion. Over 70% of Republicans say she was a good choice. Are you saying we should disregard the 70% to pander to the 30
35 Yellowstone : Trouble is, you can't win an election by just getting your party's vote. If Palin can't appeal to independents, she's out of luck.
36 RSWA330 : Yes, and if you run a moderate, you are in danger of losing a significant portion of the base which is just as bad. Nobody needs to pander to the ind
37 Mirrodie : ....and where was race even mentioned? Perhaps its forefront on your mind but no one else's? As some have mentioned, I don't see Ron Paul running aga
38 Dougloid : Can you define your mission statement? If you cannot, it doesn't matter who comes riding into town on a white horse.
39 Yellowstone : Your response ignores the fact that Obama is a moderate, pragmatic Democrat - he's a center-left president for a centrist nation. So was Clinton, as
40 Elite : Many people have immediately jumped to Bobby Jindal after Obama won because of the one issue that we oh so want to avoid but can't - race.
41 Dougloid : A 'true conservative' whatever that is can't get elected. Anyway, what's your definition of a true conservative, and why would that be better than wh
42 Post contains links Slider : http://www.americanthinker.com/2009/...onservatisms_dilemma_to_be_or.html This is a good thread to discuss. I think the question is less WHO will be t
43 Dougloid : It'd be my guess that very few people actually meet that description, m'dear fellow. Although parenthetically an awful lot of people call themselves c
44 FlyDeltaJets87 : Sure they're Democrats now. But wait till a good chunk of them get a high paying and they start paying taxes. Then they'll think twice about that.To
45 RSWA330 : I'm saying we shouldn't abandon our principles to try and draw in the independents. Instead, we need to convince the independents why our principles
46 Aaron747 : If your principles include social engineering like abstinence-only education, nation-building intervention like delivering democracy to a tyrannied p
47 WunalaYann : Please forgive my lack of command of English, but what exactly do you mean? Do you mean that there is a record to show that French people are [insert
48 FlyPNS1 : But if you look at exit polling data, this doesn't hold true. Americans in the higher income brackets actually tend to lean toward the Democrats. The
49 FreequentFlier : If only this were true. I'm a conservative/libertarian (as opposed to a Republican) but have you paid attention in the past 12 months? We've just ele
50 Post contains links WunalaYann : Which have absolutely not been reflected in economic policies implemented by "conservatives" or "fiscal conservatives" over the past 30 years. http:/
51 AGM100 : The Senators who voted against Billary for Secstate ( All two of them ! ) . Don't get me wrong , I she may do a decent job and Bill is loving it. But
52 WunalaYann : I agree, provided the issues are worth it. Opposition for the sake of saying something different just because, well, the opposition cannot really say
53 FlyDeltaJets87 : Incorrect. From 2004: Family Income S = Size, B - Bush, K = Kerry, N = Nader ............................S....B......K......N Less than $15,000 8% 36
54 Post contains links WunalaYann : And this, from 2008, will show you that it is not so incorrect after all. http://www.slate.com/id/2204043/
55 RSWA330 : So are you saying the Democrats don't do "social engineering?"
56 FlyDeltaJets87 : That does not constitute the trend that FlyPNS1 was trying to draw. He said "But if you look at exit polling data, this doesn't hold true. Americans
57 WunalaYann : I am not saying it is a trend or not, or that you or FlyPNS1 is correct/incorrect. I was merely pointing out that, just like for most things in life,
58 FlyDeltaJets87 : I did not say that either. That's why I posted the matrix with the percentage break downs and shows which income brackets lean where. Both points (yo
59 WunalaYann : Ok. Filler. Filler. Filler.
60 Alias1024 : Right now they are up against a new President with an approval rating north of 70%, who has struck some very conciliatory tones so far. A large vote
61 FlyDeltaJets87 : He has an approval rating of 70% after less than 36 hours in office - because that means a whole lot. Anyone who already approves (or disapproves for
62 FlyPNS1 : I didn't mean to imply there was a trend, though I can see how what I wrote might lead you to believe that. I was speaking specifically to the curren
63 Jcs17 : Thanks for your nuanced approach. Romney would've won in a squeaker. Mitt's eloquence rivals that of Our Savior Barack, and the fact is that Mitt doe
64 RSWA330 : I bet a large percentage of people who have a Master's degree end up working in the education field (most likely at the college level). I don't know
65 WunalaYann : While I would not go as far as discrediting someone's opinion solely on that basis, I agree with you that there is simply no way to assess his so far
66 N867DA : People wanted to impeach President Bush on January 22, 2001? What on earth for?
67 Yellowstone : I think your perspective is off. First of all, as FlyPNS1 mentioned, doctors and lawyers have done significant amounts of postgraduate study (M.D. an
68 FlyPNS1 : Not a chance. Romney would have lost just as badly. The evangelicals would have sat out the election as they dislike him even more than McCain. And R
69 RSWA330 : I should have said "instructor" instead of "professor." It is quite common to see people with Master's degrees teaching college classes. They may not
70 Aaron747 : Where was that insinuated? They do plenty.
71 FlyDeltaJets87 : At this point, even though I didn't vote for him, I hope he turns out to be a great President. Romney as the VP might have attracted some of the vote
72 RSWA330 : I read your post again and now I realize what you were saying. Both parties can be accused of "social engineering" by their respective opponents. Con
73 WunalaYann : And for what it is worth, I fail to see how an academic position would not be considered pertaining to the "real world". What is the definition of "r
74 Alias1024 : The point is the majority of the population either has a positive view of him or is willing to at least give him a chance. It's tough to oppose a pop
75 Mirrodie : ???? Look, not sure what your sources are. But apparently race is at the forefront of your mind since you jumped to play the race card so quickly whe
76 LXA333 : Pawlenty/Jindal/Romney/Ron Paul/Rice(I heard she is going back to Stanford) to name a few, I think we have a promising future. I want a Pawlenty/Jinda
77 Dougloid : Stepin Fetchit had his role, and a man will do what he must for his paycheck. I'm quite sure Strom Thurmond had black folks haulin' his water and cut
78 Yellowstone : I'd like to see your dad's boss try being a professor. It requires a tremendous amount of work and intellectual ability. To classify that as somethin
79 Slider : From each according to his abilirty, to each according to his needs. I'm sorry, you were saying? Perhaps a little history lesson is necessary as to w
80 AGM100 : Fair enough , Hillary has the potential to be pretty good at the job. The problem is that she comes from the "other" side of the ideological spectrum
81 Aaron747 : That's ironic considering both Kevin Madden and Alex Castellanos have stated publicly that Obama's victory proved he was the most capable at managing
82 FlyDeltaJets87 : What trend? You should read posts 53 and 56 through 59, or did you conveniently try to skip and ignore those because they well, counter your statemen
83 Dougloid : But Slider, m'good fellow, you simply cannot rely on performances that were rendered in 1861-1865 or what Ike did in the fifties. Your point is well
84 RSWA330 : People with a Masters can teach at a university. They may not teach advanced classes that involve extensive research, but they can and do teach basic
85 Dougloid : Sir, you are an intellectual wooly mammoth. Your kind is not wanted in the GOP. Let me venture some wisdom from my old man who once observed, "there
86 Usair320 : I agree. I consider myslef a traditional conservative. I believe in Limited Federal government, Lower Taxes, Low spending, maximum personal liberty,
87 Dougloid : I voted for Ralph Nader in 1996 because of my distaste for the Clintons...and that hasn't changed either.
88 RSWA330 : What is it that he does to hurt the party? He attacks liberal policies which is exactly what we should be doing. If we continue to let the liberals b
89 Usair320 : I think people like Limbaugh give our party a bad name. He makes it seem as if all conservatives are hate mongers.
90 Us330 : I sure as hell hope not. I didn't vote for the guy, and I don't understand what all the hype is about, but it's no use to cut off your nose just to s
91 RSWA330 : Well, I wasn't going to vote for McCain until he did pick Palin so I guess our votes cancelled each other out. You can easily have an evangelical con
92 A346Dude : Did you watch her interviews? She was terrible, and came across simply as someone who should not be Vice President. The problem isn't that she has a
93 Yellowstone : I'm curious where you have seen this occur. In my five semesters of college so far, I have never had a course led by someone who did not have a docto
94 Baroque : Dunno, there might be a loss of personnel due to hernias caused by extra bouts of laughter.
95 Aaron747 : That is an excellent summation. The only reason Herr Limbaugh said that is because the anti-NASCAR, anti-dumbdown part of the party is the only thing
96 Us330 : Well, it is clear that the two of us disagree on the concept of when life "begins," so I won't bother addressing that aspect since neither of us will
97 Post contains links JakeOrion : Rush said, and I quote: http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/home/dai...012209/content/01125106.guest.html And also: http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/home/dai...01
98 FlyPNS1 : Doesn't change the fact that Rush wants Obama to fail and in turn Americans will suffer. So basically, Rush wants Americans to suffer....pretty sad.
99 Dougloid : and, may I say, leave the gays alone to do whatever the heck they want to do. Jefferson: It matters not whether my neighbor believes in twenty gods o
100 JakeOrion : Perhaps because Obama is showing socialist policies? We can also say the same for the far left and many members on this forum. "Its my way or take th
101 Slider : And what is a Democrat? Can you tell me that the party's platform is? GOP has the same identity crisis. Which is why, for the life of me, I can't und
102 FlyDeltaJets87 : I listen to Rush quite often, and he's been saying the same thing - Obama has been elected President, and there's nothing we can do to change it. At
103 LXA333 : C'mon guys, Obama is socialist, thats why americans like myself hate him to a great extent. I love the fact that we're capitalist and not lazy, we wor
104 JakeOrion : And you will not get a straight answer. Talking smack about the other party seems to be the norm. (To be fair, the current "Republicans" are the same
105 Confuscius : The future for the GOP would be as a vocal minority opposition party. Alan Keyes works for him?
106 Post contains links Cairo : Yeah, Republicans won Texas - but not a single big city in Texas. Not Houston, not Dallas, not San Antonio, Austin, nor El Paso. They also didn't win
107 Us330 : Texas was closer than you might think--it was 56-44 in favor of McCain--and much of the population that you will see will either be in the cities (bl
108 Post contains links and images FlyDeltaJets87 : Looking at the 2004 election to the 2008, the Repulicans didn't lose many votes in Texas - Bush received just over 4.5 million votes in 2004 and McCa
109 Usair320 : As a Republican (who voted for Obama) I couldn't be angrier with Rush. I want what's best for America and any true patriot would. Rush is not a patri
110 JRDC930 : None. And this is coming from someone who used to generally vote republican ( i still wont vote democrat though). Untill they drop their bull crap eco
111 Cairo : To me it is the cities that are most revealing: look how the Dems now carry the cities, many in solid red states, which they didn't previously: Houst
112 FlyPNS1 : Obama's going to run big deficits for the next 4 years....guaranteed. Reagan ran huge deficits during his years even when the economy was relatively
113 FlyDeltaJets87 : Socialism is robbery IMO but that's for a different thread. Point is, I see (and so does Rush) that if Obama pursues the agenda he set forth in his c
114 JRDC930 : America want socialism, and any republican who's gonna challenge the dems and hope to have any chance at wining needs to realize this. Weve had enough
115 Post contains links Confuscius : In fact Maricopa Co. was the largest margin of victory for McCain. He won by 113,000 votes. OTOH, Obama won Cook Co. by 1,083,000 votes. Margin of vi
116 LXA333 : No, my friend, you want socialism! I hope to become an investment banker once everything gets better and I graduate from college! I know many people
117 Post contains links Santosdumont : Maybe it runs against conservative principles, but it certainly doesn't run against Republican (and, to a degree, Democratic) principles. This 1990 a
118 Dougloid : Eminently sensible, m'good fellow. Do you think they'll listen to you? I think someone here took me to task for opining that Limbaugh and Hannity wer
119 Post contains links WunalaYann : And because The Economist can be eloquent yet enlightening when you need it: http://www.economist.com/research/ar...nterFriendly.cfm?story_id=12599247
120 Baroque : One of the reasons that the last 8 years were less than successful is because the Reps did not listen to advice outside a very narrow base. And it lo
121 Us330 : Great article, and I agree with it entirely. Thanks for the link.
122 Slider : No it isn't. The reason they weren't successful is because the man in the Oval Office--who should have been a standard bearer for the conservative pr
123 AGM100 : How dare you !! ..you....you evil man ! Don't you care about others ? Don't you care about the children ? The poor ? What about them? ! Dont you know
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Who Do You Have An Opinion Of, And What Is It? posted Sat Jan 5 2002 06:41:25 by CleCo
Who Do You Think Is The Best Guitarist? posted Mon Nov 19 2007 02:48:14 by Cumulus
Who Do You Think Will Make The Super Bowl posted Mon Dec 30 2002 00:42:59 by I LOVE EWR
Who Do You Think Will Be The Next Mets Manager? posted Sat Oct 5 2002 22:32:48 by Dragon-wings
Who Do You Think Will Light The Olympic Fire? posted Wed Feb 6 2002 17:02:59 by B737-700
The Best TV News Anchor --- Who Do You Think? posted Sat Jun 2 2001 00:10:09 by LAX
Who Do You Think Will Win The Yugo Elections? posted Sat Sep 23 2000 04:06:53 by JAT
Do You Think The UK Will Ever Return The Malvinas posted Wed Aug 4 2004 06:26:35 by Luisca
When Do You Think The War Will Start posted Mon Mar 10 2003 09:08:38 by Bruce
Do You Think The UK Will Adapt The Euro? posted Thu Jun 6 2002 19:47:23 by PH-BFA