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Airbii?  
User currently offlineJamincan From Canada, joined Aug 2006, 776 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5071 times:

I've noticed a lot of people refer to multiple Airbus aircraft as Airbii on here. I find this silly for several reasons: first, even if we were speaking Latin, which, considering this is an English language forum, I think it is reasonable to assume that we are not, nouns ending in 'us' would simply end in a single 'i' to indicate the plural, not 'ii'. It is not Airbius, it's Airbus. Secondly, bus, and therefore (I assume) Airbus, finds its root in the latin word 'omnibus', which is already plural, so it seems just a little bit odd to be using a latin form of the plural on it when it wouldn't have even be used in the original language.

In any case, except in those situations where the aberrant plural form has actually be adopted into the language (ie. data), why don't we all just stick with the english plural form for english words instead of making ourselves look foolish by adding an i (or worse, two i's) at the end of every word ending in 'us'.

67 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 4089 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5061 times:

Or.... we could jsut not be anal about a very small thing and let people get on with their lives? If people want to use Airbii, thats their choice.

User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5182 posts, RR: 33
Reply 2, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5057 times:



Quoting Moo (Reply 1):
Or.... we could jsut not be anal about a very small thing and let people get on with their lives? If people want to use Airbii, thats their choice.

I always assumed it was just a piss take to wind up those who took grammar too seriously. It seems to be working.



That'll teach you
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 3, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5047 times:



Quoting Moo (Reply 1):
anal about a very small thing and let people get on with their lives? If people want to use Airbii, thats their choice.

Or it could be that some of us are old enough to have done Latin and know it is incorrect (or an incorrect singular), so that is why we use it????


User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 4089 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5047 times:



Quoting Baroque (Reply 3):
Or it could be that some of us are old enough to have done Latin and know it is incorrect (or an incorrect singular), so that is why we use it????

Language changes through usage. Live with it.


User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5810 posts, RR: 31
Reply 5, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5038 times:

I don't think it's meant to be taken seriously. It's just some light-hearted name-playing, similar to the way "yoof" seems to automatically replace "youth" in UK journalistic circles, when talking about TV programmes.

User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 6, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5031 times:



Quoting Moo (Reply 4):
Language changes through usage. Live with it.

Not Latin, it is DEAD. All it does is become more permineralized.


User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 4089 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5022 times:



Quoting Baroque (Reply 6):
Not Latin, it is DEAD. All it does is become more permineralized.

If we are using it in every day language, and we are, then its hardly dead now is it  Wink

I've got an exercise for you - pop back 150 years in time and speak to an english speaking person. I guarantee you that you won't have an easy time in that conversation  Smile


User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10335 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5019 times:



Quoting Jamincan (Thread starter):
In any case, except in those situations where the aberrant plural form has actually be adopted into the language (ie. data), why don't we all just stick with the english plural form for english words instead of making ourselves look foolish by adding an i (or worse, two i's) at the end of every word ending in 'us'.

If you really want to avoid looking foolish, I suggest you not post topics complaining about folks having a bit of fun by using "Airbii".

But hey, that's just my opinion.



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 9, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5011 times:



Quoting Moo (Reply 7):
I've got an exercise for you - pop back 150 years in time and speak to an english speaking person.

Is that not the same as being brought up in 1940s Tyneside?


User currently offlineJamincan From Canada, joined Aug 2006, 776 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4991 times:

Okay, maybe I'm being a bit of a syntax freak. I just find Airbii to be particularly ridiculous - it's one thing to indiscriminately apply Latin plurals inappropriately, but Airbii seems to bring it to a new level.

In any case, I came across this post on pseudo-latin plurals, which is quite interesting. Apparently I'm guilty too: who new biceps was singular?


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9543 posts, RR: 42
Reply 11, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4985 times:



Quoting Jamincan (Thread starter):
nouns ending in 'us' would simply end in a single 'i' to indicate the plural, not 'ii'. It is not Airbius, it's Airbus

I've mentioned this before and the funny thing is that some of those who claim it's a deliberate "joke" are often shown to take it much more seriously than the likes of you and me, who are simply curious where the extra "i" comes from. Pursue it and you'll see.  Smile

I mean, if it's really just for fun, why not "Airbiii" or "Airbiiii"? Anyone who knows how it works already recognises "Airbi" as a light-hearted "faux pas". I'm sure there are many who confuse "there", "their" and "they're" who claim they only do it for fun.  duck 

I also think people should recognise the difference between demanding that it stop and simply asking why.  biggrin 


User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 12, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 4984 times:



Quoting Jamincan (Reply 10):
In any case, I came across this post on pseudo-latin plurals, which is quite interesting.

I hope you don't ever find out about cases as well.  Big grin


User currently offlineTheSonntag From Germany, joined Jun 2005, 3763 posts, RR: 29
Reply 13, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4984 times:



Quoting Baroque (Reply 6):
Not Latin, it is DEAD

No it is not. It is our shared cultural heritage. Remembering this helps to overcome conflicts and to focus on things which unite us.


User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10335 posts, RR: 26
Reply 14, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4968 times:



Quoting David L (Reply 11):
I mean, if it's really just for fun, why not "Airbiii" or "Airbiiii"? Anyone who knows how it works already recognises "Airbi" as a light-hearted "faux pas". I'm sure there are many who confuse "there", "their" and "they're" who claim they only do it for fun.

That's it. From now on I am referring to them as "Airbiiiii" (5 i's.....no more, no less)  Smile

And I suppose more than one road bus shall now be "biiiii".



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21521 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4961 times:



Quoting Baroque (Reply 6):
Quoting Moo (Reply 4):
Language changes through usage. Live with it.

Not Latin, it is DEAD. All it does is become more permineralized.

 rotfl   bigthumbsup 

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 13):
No it is not. It is our shared cultural heritage.

And, as heritage so often is, it is in fact deadBig grin

By the way: There are various irregular latin nouns which end in -us (apart from omnibus which isn't a native noun) but which still don't have an "i" plural.


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9543 posts, RR: 42
Reply 16, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4950 times:



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 14):
That's it. From now on I am referring to them as "Airbiiiii" (5 i's.....no more, no less)

Iiiiiiiiii have no problem with that.  biggrin 

Quoting Klaus (Reply 15):
By the way: There are various irregular latin nouns which end in -us (apart from omnibus which isn't a native noun) but which still don't have an "i" plural.

4th declension nouns: -us, -us, e.g. manus, manus.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 15):
Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 13):
No it is not. It is our shared cultural heritage.

And, as heritage so often is, it is in fact dead! Big grin

The same can be said of "shared" these days.  Smile


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10930 posts, RR: 37
Reply 17, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4949 times:



Quoting Jamincan (Thread starter):
I've noticed a lot of people refer to multiple Airbus aircraft as Airbii on here.

It seems that we had a topic on this a while ago. I think the thread had something to do with the new A380s. When I first saw "Airbii" on that thread, I hald a good laugh and I liked it.
Grammatically, latin or not it is not correct.

The plural in Latin should be "Airbi" I think. Any latin scholars around?

I like "Airbii" only because I think it's funny.  Big grin



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9543 posts, RR: 42
Reply 18, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4939 times:



Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 17):

I like "Airbii" only because I think it's funny.

I'd find "Airbuses" correct and "Airbiii+" funny. To me, "Airbii" looks like someone trying to be clever and falling on their arse.  Smile


User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25692 posts, RR: 85
Reply 19, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 4931 times:
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Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 2):
I always assumed it was just a piss take to wind up those who took grammar too seriously. It seems to be working.

Pretty much. Those of us who enjoy playing games with language having some fun.  Smile

Quoting Baroque (Reply 6):
Not Latin, it is DEAD.

It may be dead to you, it isn't to me. I bless my cotton socks that I had some Latin when I started to learn German.

Otherwise, I might have been like Richard Porson, in the 18th century, who said "life is too short to learn German."  Smile

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9543 posts, RR: 42
Reply 20, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4922 times:



Quoting Mariner (Reply 19):
Those of us who enjoy playing games with language having some fun

I must remember that next time I try to be clever and make a mess of it.  Smile

Quoting Mariner (Reply 19):
I might have been like Richard Porson, in the 18th century, who said "life is too short to learn German."

Lucky he never tried Polish.  eyepopping 


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21521 posts, RR: 53
Reply 21, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4915 times:



Quoting David L (Reply 16):
The same can be said of "shared" these days.

Yea, by now we know that you've got a fundamental problem with that concept...  mischievous 

Quoting Mariner (Reply 19):
It may be dead to you, it isn't to me.

Not all of us have still seen it alive...!

Quoting Mariner (Reply 19):
I bless my cotton socks that I had some Latin when I started to learn German.

I more or less curse the day when I was pressed into latin classes. It doesn't really hurt knowing it, but being forced to learn it was a real drag for me.  yuck 


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9543 posts, RR: 42
Reply 22, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4906 times:



Quoting Klaus (Reply 21):

Yea, by now we know that you've got a fundamental problem with that concept...

Me?  confused  Example?


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21521 posts, RR: 53
Reply 23, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4905 times:



Quoting David L (Reply 22):
Me?    Example?

Any thread with the words "common" and "Britain" in it, perhaps?


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9543 posts, RR: 42
Reply 24, posted (5 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4900 times:



Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):

Any thread with the words "common" and "Britain" in it, perhaps?

Ah! I think you're confusing "shared" with "doormat".  Smile


25 Klaus : I don't find "doormat" anywhere near, just "shared". Maybe the confusion is somewhere else?
26 David L : The EU gets a damned good share of the UK's contributions so I guess I just don't see your point... unless you're referring to the UK not agreeing to
27 Post contains images Klaus : There it is again... I rest my case. But I think we can postpone this to the next regularly scheduled EU/Britain thread, don't you think?
28 MadameConcorde : Back to Airbii... What would be the grammatically correct plural for Airbus in Latin?
29 Mariner : There isn't one - Airbus is not a Latin word. The nearest we have is that nouns ending in "us" take the plural "i". The plural of hippopotamus is hip
30 Nighthawk : Surely this whole conversation is irrelevent anyway, Airbus is just a company, and cannot exist in the plural - unless Airbus was split in half and bo
31 Cadet57 : But god help you if you dare utter Whalejet...
32 Slider : It would be Airbi if Airbus were a Latin word. But like the old Road Runner cartoons that would throw some gibberish Latinized descriptor of the Road
33 Mariner : And I suppose "Winnie ille Pu" doesn't count, because that was an accurate (fairly) translation into Latin. mariner
34 Slz396 : 2 things I'd like to point out: 1- Latin is not a dead language, it is the official language of an independent country today: i.e. the Vatican and as
35 Klaus : Case in point!
36 Mariner : Oh. I thought the plural of "corpus" is "corpora." mariner
37 Phoenix9 : Or something like Silica Vaginitous
38 Jamincan : But not always; for example, several octopuses are not octopi, but octopodes, more than one genus is genera, and so on and so forth.
39 Skysurfer : I hope Latin isn't dead, otherwise i'd have a really hard time at work when i'm dealing with plants!!! Almost every plant that isn't an annual has a L
40 Post contains images Klaus : My guess would be that it was once considered a remedy...? Poor plant, though!
41 Baroque : I sit corrected. However inventing new words to fit in the galaxy of Latin grammar, only gets it to the emergency room and not quite on life support?
42 Post contains links WunalaYann : And because a thread about public transport would not be a thread about public transport without a damn' Frog claiming to know all, http://fr.wikipedi
43 Baroque : OK you own it and you know where to come to get your Royalties, but I presumes it still has to be dative or ablative? Or it ain't an Omnibus.
44 Post contains images Andz : I definitely do
45 Kaitak : Any company's product can exist in the plural (they wouldn't be in business if it didn't!) ... we talk about Boeings, Toshibas, Peugeots etc. Using t
46 Andz : It is a company name so plural does not apply. If the need arises to imply a plural, add one word for correct English. "I have flown on several Airbu
47 KevinL1011 : I'll agree with that. Rail fans have a similar argument when it comes to the plural of "Caboose". Some say the plural is "Cabeese" and not "Caboose's
48 Andz : Good post apart from the apostrophe abuse
49 MadameConcorde : I ike Airbii. I think it's funny. I had a good laugh the first time I saw it on the other thread. The original poster who had found it had a fantastic
50 David L : The plural of octopus is not octopi mostly because octopus is Greek, not Latin. A better example would be... ... or the examples Slz396 mentioned. It
51 Baroque : Good post apart from the serious apostrophe abuse.
52 Post contains images KevinL1011 : With reference to Superfly, more than one bimbo can be plural and possessive. And, here we have...
53 David L : Six Elveese?
54 Post contains images Klaus : No, not really. Latin is too different from German to be really useful there. It helps in understanding where some germanized words originated, but t
55 Slider : Haha...there's no many... My Dad was a USAF pilot and then in the Air National Guard. His old guard patch and logo read in "Latin": Ragge Diassm Ilit
56 Superfly : I prefer Bimbos. Bimbi sounds too close to Bambi. Airbii? Sounds silly and most would make the connection to Latin. Just stick with Airbuses for pura
57 Slz396 : Indeed, that's a mistake of mine: the examples I gave here are somewhat confusing in that they are all words ending on '-us' which don't have their p
58 Post contains images KevinL1011 : Like the scene in "The Life of Brian" when John Cleese is giving Brian a Latin lesson. How many Romans? Andz, we need a ruling on this one.
59 Mariner : That's okay, I made a mistake too. I should have said "many" Latin nouns ending in "us" take the "i" plural. But I admit you had my brain spinning ov
60 Bwest : Interesting about brand names is that the plural of the name often changes depending on which language is spoken. In dutch, two airbus planes would be
61 Post contains links Baroque : Englsih grammar is too adumbral to fit within Latin so it was more the idea that there could be a thing called grammar that was more of a help. Maybe
62 Andz : As John Cleese might have said, this is getting very silly!
63 Klaus : Hard to say... but when looking from english, german and latin may indeed seem to have some similarities.
64 David L : ... Except that it would be Airbodes.
65 Mariner : But not as funny. In the same way that Airbii is - I think - funnier than Airbi. None are correct. mariner
66 Baroque : Anyone getting a name for a plurality of Airb** correct should be instantly sent to Coventry (from where they must pay daily pilgrimages to the nearb
67 David L : I'll have to take your word for it.
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