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Arguments Against Legalizing Drugs...  
User currently offlineJoeCanuck From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 5383 posts, RR: 30
Posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3960 times:

...what are they?

I've been pondering what would happen if currently illegal drugs, not just grass, were legalized.

There would certainly be benefits; quality and supply could be regulated, as could prices. They could be taxed, much like booze, and that would create money for addiction treatment, if nothing else.

Billions of dollars would be saved in trying to continually fight the losing battles that have come with criminalization. The worst of crime would be almost instantly eliminated as street drug profits disappear.

Those are some of the benefits...what are the hazards?


What the...?
73 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3077 posts, RR: 20
Reply 1, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3949 times:

Street crime would not disappear....How the hell do you think the street addicts would pay for their now legal drugs....People hooked on drugs are not normally employable....While there would be no Street dealing there would be the same B&E's and robberies to pay...in fact these may go up as people no longer have to hide their addictions..

Plus people who have drugs would be robbery targets and these drugs would then be sold to other users creating another kind of dealer.....


Note this is more applicable to chemical drugs....
GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9703 posts, RR: 27
Reply 2, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3949 times:
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Quoting JoeCanuck (Thread starter):

Those are some of the benefits...what are the hazards?

Well, there's the obvious: health hazards.

Some drugs are incredibly addictive, and don't exactly do any favors for your mental and physical health.

I generally support legalization of weed. Harder drugs, though? Much more difficult question.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineLowrider From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 3220 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3948 times:

Are we (or you) prepared as a society to shoulder the cost of highly addictive drugs that have little or no medical value, and many have detrimental health effects? Other than reducing enforcement costs, and a few additional tax dollars, what benefit would it have?

Take alcohol, for example. What is the total cost from drunk driving enforcement, injuries, deaths, missed days of work, property damage, rehabilitation, other alcohol related accidents (such as boating or snowmobiling accidents), licensing, and regulation? While we do collect a lot of tax from alcohol sales, does it off set this? We will also have to screen for every legalized drug that could be detrimental to in a safety sensitive job, such as pilots and mechanics. These tests will have to be developed and paid for. Policies will have to written and enforced as to what is acceptable and what is not. These policies should have sound clinical trials to back them up. Standards and enforcement for the standards will have to be developed. Regulation costs money too. It isn't as simple as saying, "OK, go smoke and shoot up to your heart's content now".

So, what is the benefit to society of legalizing other drugs? If it is only for monetary reasons, then it is a sad commentary on our values.

I am not a a prohibitionist or a tea totaller. I like wine with a nice meal, or a good beer as much as the next guy, but if alcohol dissappeared tomorrow it would not significantly alter my life.



Proud OOTSK member
User currently offlineJetsGo From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 3079 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3943 times:

Personally, I'm in the middle. But to address the topic:

Today, pot is a gateway drug. It is what non serious druggies use and what kids try just to rebel. If we legalize it, what becomes the next gateway drug? Cocaine? That's way worse of a drug and I sure as hell wouldn't want my kids someday using it as a gateway.



Marine Corps Aviation, The Last To Let You Down!
User currently offlineMBMBOS From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2597 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3937 times:

You know, I don't particularly know this era of history well, but I know that some claim that a few hundred years ago China lost its status as a powerful nation because of extensive opium addiction.

The historians among you can weigh in on this one. But I think one of the strongest arguments against full spectrum drug legalization could be one of national security. Opiates, for example, seem extremely damaging; the kind of damage that on a large scale could cripple a country (unmotivated workforce, rampant illness, selling resources to the lowest bidder for the expedience of more opium, etc.)

Anyway, I think of cocaine and heroin as really terrible drugs and I'd hate to see widespread addiction. Both drugs have proven to be highly addictive and physically damaging.

People should be able to smoke and sell pot as far as I'm concerned.


User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8373 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3937 times:

Yeah this is really hard. The best thing about legalization is that the money is removed from the illegal drug system. But if you think about it, plenty of legal drugs (Oxycontin) are abused a whole bunch today. And companies make lots of money off that.

So what is the solution? Maybe legalize pot but some states are already doing that. Another solution is the death penalty. Singapore does that.


User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3918 times:



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 2):
Well, there's the obvious: health hazards.

Some drugs are incredibly addictive, and don't exactly do any favors for your mental and physical health.

I generally support legalization of weed. Harder drugs, though? Much more difficult question

Yet these things you just made reference too are exactly the same now that they are illegal. People get them anyway.

Why does my state of NY insist of not allowing poker or gaming yet you can bet on horses? It's lunacy. Legalize and tax it all. Prostitution, drugs and gambling. Nothing would change except the police wouldn't waste money on things they make no difference with and each state would make a ton of revenue and the drug cartels would collapse. Sounds good to me.


User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8929 posts, RR: 40
Reply 8, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3913 times:

Quoting Greasespot (Reply 1):
How the hell do you think the street addicts would pay for their now legal drugs

These drugs would be much cheaper. No one fights over cheap stuff. As long as we don't make the mistake of legalizing it and taxing it to the point it becomes about as expensive as they are now, things will change. Much of the violence comes from drug trafficking, and that will essentially be completely gone.

Quoting Greasespot (Reply 1):

Plus people who have drugs would be robbery targets and these drugs would then be sold to other users creating another kind of dealer.....

This argument also assumes a very high price will remain.

[Edited 2009-04-08 19:20:45]


"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9703 posts, RR: 27
Reply 9, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3897 times:
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Quoting Lowrider (Reply 3):
So, what is the benefit to society of legalizing other drugs? If it is only for monetary reasons, then it is a sad commentary on our values.

That may be true.

But the same could be said for why alcohol is still legal (monetary reasons). Far as I can tell, alcohol does absolutely no service to society in general.

It seems to me, in general, that legalizing drugs may end one set of problems, but create another set. Same with prohibiting alcohol - you don't end up with less problems, you just end up with different problems.

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 7):
Yet these things you just made reference too are exactly the same now that they are illegal. People get them anyway.

Oh I know. But he asked about hazards. And hazards they are.

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 7):
Nothing would change except the police wouldn't waste money on things they make no difference with and each state would make a ton of revenue and the drug cartels would collapse. Sounds good to me.

See this:

Quoting Lowrider (Reply 3):
What is the total cost from drunk driving enforcement, injuries, deaths, missed days of work, property damage, rehabilitation, other alcohol related accidents (such as boating or snowmobiling accidents), licensing, and regulation? While we do collect a lot of tax from alcohol sales, does it off set this? We will also have to screen for every legalized drug that could be detrimental to in a safety sensitive job, such as pilots and mechanics. These tests will have to be developed and paid for. Policies will have to written and enforced as to what is acceptable and what is not. These policies should have sound clinical trials to back them up. Standards and enforcement for the standards will have to be developed. Regulation costs money too. It isn't as simple as saying, "OK, go smoke and shoot up to your heart's content now".

Like I said: eliminate one problem, create another. I don't think it's an easy decision.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8929 posts, RR: 40
Reply 10, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3892 times:

I believe the question of whether the costs (monetary, social, etc.) of legalizing/prohibiting alcohol was answered by the passage of the twenty-first amendment to the US Constitution after some hands-on experience.

If you want, legalize one drug at a time and figure out the costs (not just monetary). But don't expect all the results promised at once when you only legalize one drug.

Also remember another non-monetary cost of prohibition: my freedom of choice.



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineFlymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7088 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3880 times:

no no no!!! First these are horrible drugs. Second the government would not sell these drugs for cheap so the drug cartels will always be selling them at a lower price. We already have a huge drug problem why make it worse. Also speaking of money imagine the medical cost and how many more people would die from drug use.


"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineVonRichtofen From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 4627 posts, RR: 37
Reply 12, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3880 times:

An even harder one to argue is why prostitution should not be legalized.


Word
User currently offlineLowrider From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 3220 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 3864 times:



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 9):
why alcohol is still legal

I agree with you. The only reason it is legal is we found that it was too inconvienent to outlaw it. The whole "camel got his nose under the tent" analogy springs to mind. Like I said earlier, it wouldn't make a difference to me personally if alcohol went away tonight. I think the costs far outweigh the benefits. BUT, I am not certain if that is going too far in imposing my ideals on others. Look at how many people, from teens to otherwise responsible adults, virtually worship at the alter of alcohol and good times. I can only imagine how they would react if I took away their god. I can only imagine how much worse it would be with more powerful drugs.



Proud OOTSK member
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 8836 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3856 times:

Is there anyone out there who has not been touched by drugs? How could anyone who has, even think about legalizing them. The experiance I had was family, not good, tragic, the saddest thing that I have seen, except fatal illness. It has been in my childrens neighborhood friends, 25 years ago now. Two brothers have no life from them, completly wasted. I thank God, my children did not get involved, now I worry about my Grandchildren.


It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2741 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3856 times:

I'm too socially libertarian to support our nation's current stance on drug laws. I follow them because I have no desire to use drugs that are now illegal, not to mention the random testing at work as mandated by the FAA. I don't really see why drugs shouldn't be legalized with a structure of regulation and laws similar to alcohol. I don't care what someone does with their own body, but it crosses the line when it endangers someone else.

Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 9):
Far as I can tell, alcohol does absolutely no service to society in general.

It helps ugly men and women get laid.

Quoting VonRichtofen (Reply 12):
An even harder one to argue is why prostitution should not be legalized.

 checkmark 
It would require some regulation, but I can't make an argument for why two consenting adults shouldn't be able to do what they want with their bodies behind closed doors. I've always thought it strange that it's legal for an actor/actress to be paid to have sex on camera, but illegal if one of the people having sex is paying the other one.

Quoting Flymia (Reply 11):
Second the government would not sell these drugs for cheap so the drug cartels will always be selling them at a lower price.

Who said anything about the government selling the drugs? The government would tax them, but I would imagine that private enterprises would create and sell the drugs. Prices would fall due to the competition. Free markets would drive prices down from where they are now.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlineJoeCanuck From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 5383 posts, RR: 30
Reply 16, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3848 times:



Quoting Greasespot (Reply 1):
Street crime would not disappear....How the hell do you think the street addicts would pay for their now legal drugs....People hooked on drugs are not normally employable....While there would be no Street dealing there would be the same B&E's and robberies to pay...in fact these may go up as people no longer have to hide their addictions..

Plus people who have drugs would be robbery targets and these drugs would then be sold to other users creating another kind of dealer.....

Any drug that anybody wants to use is readily available right now and they are going to get them. Ask the kids or your neighbor or mom how to buy drugs. Chances are, they know and can get them in about a half hour.

Currently, they get them from a series of criminal organizations. Society is already paying for the drug use and add to that the cost of completely ineffectually policing them.

Quoting Lowrider (Reply 3):
Are we (or you) prepared as a society to shoulder the cost of highly addictive drugs that have little or no medical value, and many have detrimental health effects? Other than reducing enforcement costs, and a few additional tax dollars, what benefit would it have?

That cost is already being shouldered by society...and society isn't getting anything for the trouble. Anybody who wants or needs to use drugs is getting them already...right now.

Quoting Lowrider (Reply 3):
Take alcohol, for example. What is the total cost from drunk driving enforcement, injuries, deaths, missed days of work, property damage, rehabilitation, other alcohol related accidents (such as boating or snowmobiling accidents), licensing, and regulation? While we do collect a lot of tax from alcohol sales, does it off set this?

Prohibition proved that people will drink anyway. The 30's led to an exponential rise in organized crime. The mob was built on booze. From that, it was a short journey to drugs and more gangsters shooting up cities. Yay prohibition.

Quoting JetsGo (Reply 4):

Today, pot is a gateway drug.

That myth has been around for decades. I remember seeing that film in school 30 years ago. The theory is that people will smoke pot, then grow addicted and need a bigger rush and move up to coke, smack, whatever.

The fact is that tobacco and booze are the primary gateway drugs...if you believe in that theory. There are plenty of people who drink who aren't alcoholics and who smoke dope without getting addicted. Tobacco is much more addictive than either.

Regardless, people can get addicted to anything. Gambling has finally been legalized. Now, society gets the profits and even spins some of it back into addiction programs. The mobs run some casinos but they also pay taxes.

Quoting Flymia (Reply 11):
no no no!!! First these are horrible drugs. Second the government would not sell these drugs for cheap so the drug cartels will always be selling them at a lower price. We already have a huge drug problem why make it worse. Also speaking of money imagine the medical cost and how many more people would die from drug use.

Of course the government could sell drugs cheaper than the cartels. They would just become the biggest gang and it's all about volume. Besides, they wouldn't have to sell for a profit. The billions saved by a much smaller war on drugs would make up any difference.

There isn't a single person who can't get drugs if they want them, including everyone in prison. Face it...if we can't even keep drugs out of prisons, what chance do we have out in the world? Addicts are already getting the drugs and society is already paying the price...with no compensation.

Something certainly has to change. The war on drugs is being lost...if it's not lost already. Whatever is being done now isn't working...not even a little.

Perhaps legalization isn't the answer...if not, what is?



What the...?
User currently offlineVikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9703 posts, RR: 27
Reply 17, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days ago) and read 3833 times:
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Quoting JoeCanuck (Reply 16):

The fact is that tobacco and booze are the primary gateway drugs...if you believe in that theory.

 checkmark 

I actually meant to say that too. In my view, tobacco and alcohol are much more of gateway drugs than weed. And they're perfectly legal, for better or for worse.

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 15):

It helps ugly men and women get laid.

Haha, I knew someone was going to respond with that  Smile

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 14):
Is there anyone out there who has not been touched by drugs? How could anyone who has, even think about legalizing them. The experiance I had was family, not good, tragic, the saddest thing that I have seen, except fatal illness. It has been in my childrens neighborhood friends, 25 years ago now. Two brothers have no life from them, completly wasted. I thank God, my children did not get involved, now I worry about my Grandchildren.

I haven't really been touched by illegal drugs in a negative way, but I've fought my own battle with alcohol. It was a horrible few years, and it's still painful for me to think about it, and especially about the pain I caused my family.

But despite that, I'm not a prohibitionist. The fact that alcohol is legal was not a causal factor for me (though it did, obviously, make obtaining it less of a hassle). But an addict surely isn't going to let mere laws get in the way of their addiction.

I view drug use and abuse similarly. At a certain point, it's solely up to the individual to make smart decisions.

Quoting Lowrider (Reply 13):
I think the costs far outweigh the benefits. BUT, I am not certain if that is going too far in imposing my ideals on others.

I too think the costs outweigh the benefits. But I don't support making alcohol illegal. And I don't judge people who drink (that'd be pretty darn hypocritical of me, given my past).



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineSmcmac32msn From United States of America, joined May 2004, 2211 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (5 years 3 months 6 days ago) and read 3832 times:

We should legalize weed and tax the hell out of it. Pay for new roads, education, and reduce usage........... it would end up like ciggarettes.... but we tax it at a higher rate sooner.


Hey Obama, keep the change! I want my dollar back.
User currently offlineJoeCanuck From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 5383 posts, RR: 30
Reply 19, posted (5 years 3 months 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 3821 times:



Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 14):
Is there anyone out there who has not been touched by drugs? How could anyone who has, even think about legalizing them. The experiance I had was family, not good, tragic, the saddest thing that I have seen, except fatal illness. It has been in my childrens neighborhood friends, 25 years ago now. Two brothers have no life from them, completly wasted. I thank God, my children did not get involved, now I worry about my Grandchildren.

This could actually be an argument FOR the legalization of drugs. These people whose lives were shattered by drugs still managed to get them. Drugs being illegal hasn't prevented one single person from getting them.

Drugs of any sort are pitifully easy for anyone to get...just go to any schoolyard in america. Ask the kids. If they don't know any drug dealers, they can tell you who does.

The drugs are already out there. No matter how tough the sanctions and penalties, the problem keeps growing.

Drugs are destroying millions of lives and it's getting worse...not better. Whatever the hell we're doing now isn't working.

Drugs being legal can't possibly make them more accessible. They are available to whomever wishes to buy them. They are completely out of control and we are powerless to stop it.

The system is broken...can it be fixed...?



What the...?
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 20, posted (5 years 3 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 3774 times:



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 2):
Well, there's the obvious: health hazards.
Yes, in general they would be lower. Esp if you have needles also available to stop the spread of Hep alpha soup and HIV.
Some drugs are incredibly addictive, and don't exactly do any favors for your mental and physical health.

It is a little known fact that these drugs are much less addictive when bought illegally. No wait, that cannot be true. Sorry to sound flippant, but so what? They are all of those things and worse due to contamination when illegal.

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 7):
Why does my state of NY insist of not allowing poker or gaming yet you can bet on horses? It's lunacy. Legalize and tax it all. Prostitution, drugs and gambling. Nothing would change except the police wouldn't waste money on things they make no difference with and each state would make a ton of revenue and the drug cartels would collapse. Sounds good to me.

 checkmark  We might both want to nip downstairs in case it has frozen over, but here I am in furious agreement.  bigthumbsup  Nice summary of the main points for how stupid are present policies.

Some years ago the BBC made a program on drugs. They pointed out that the classic hard drugs were developed as a response to making the less lethal versions illegal. Opium has a strong smell so it was refined to heroin which made it easier to smuggle and it does not smell, except to sniffer dogs.

A truck load of coca leaves was a lot less dangerous than cocaine, let alone crack, not that I actually know what crack is. And then of course suppressing all those simply awful heroin and cocaine drugs simply led to synthetics some of which are even worse for health.

I assume the BBC was right when they pointed out that the hypodermic needle was invented by a Scots doctor who was worried about his wife's addiction to heroin taken orally as a medicine as it commonly was in the 19th century. He figured that if he could bypass the alimentary tract, it would not be addictive - OOOPS. And the second oops was his wife was the first to die of an injected overdose of heroin.

Get the official in the taxation departments to organize the sale, they will love it. That is if they don't get assassinated by worried crims in the drug business.  covereyes 


User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 3910 posts, RR: 28
Reply 21, posted (5 years 3 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 3772 times:

My argument against legalization of drugs is simple - it's called "Amsterdam". Have you ever been to the place? It is a perfect example of what happens to society once you send out the message that drugs are OK. The whole place stinks of weed, there are "magic mushroom" shops in every street corner and you cannot walk 10 meters without walking by a guy trying to sell you ectasy or cocaine. Does anyone really think it is a coincidence the Netherlands are responsible for producing 90% of the world's ectasy?

The last thing I want is to be standing in a bus stop and have a guy standing next to me holding a lit reefer. It is bad enough that my downstairs neighbor smokes weed all the time, if yu tell people it is OK to stink the streets it is going to get ugly.



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19278 posts, RR: 58
Reply 22, posted (5 years 3 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3767 times:



Quoting Greasespot (Reply 1):
Street crime would not disappear....How the hell do you think the street addicts would pay for their now legal drugs....People hooked on drugs are not normally employable....While there would be no Street dealing there would be the same B&E's and robberies to pay...in fact these may go up as people no longer have to hide their addictions..

Yeah, but it wouldn't get worse. A major portion of the cost of illegal drugs is the risk of being illegal. So if they were legal, they'd be a lot cheaper. Yeah, addicts would still have to beg, borrow, and steal, but not as much.

Quoting JetsGo (Reply 4):

Today, pot is a gateway drug. It is what non serious druggies use and what kids try just to rebel. If we legalize it, what becomes the next gateway drug? Cocaine? That's way worse of a drug and I sure as hell wouldn't want my kids someday using it as a gateway.

The "gateway" theory has been repeatedly disproved.

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 14):
Is there anyone out there who has not been touched by drugs? How could anyone who has, even think about legalizing them.

Yes, in fact my nephew died at 21 after a long battle with drugs and depression. Had those drugs been legal, he might not have been thrown into jail. He would have had an easier time getting rehab. He might be alive today.


User currently offlineMax550 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 1147 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (5 years 3 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3747 times:



Quoting Pyrex (Reply 21):
My argument against legalization of drugs is simple - it's called "Amsterdam". Have you ever been to the place?

I was there last year, and I remember it far differently from the way you describe it. There were parts of the city where the prostitution and drug use was, but if you didn't want to see or be involved with that the rest of the city was just as clean, if not cleaner, than any city where drugs are illegal. I also didn't run into the people selling ecstasy and cocaine, but I don't doubt that they are there. Drugs like that should remain illegal, marijuana is a different story though.
I also think that keeping pot illegal makes other illegal drugs seem less harmful to people. All through your childhood you're told how bad pot is, then you try it and find out it's not that bad for you. Wouldn't you then think that all these other drugs that people say are so bad really aren't all that bad? Maybe that's why people say pot is a gateway drug.


User currently offlineGreasespot From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 3077 posts, RR: 20
Reply 24, posted (5 years 3 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3745 times:

again someone hooked on crack is still not employable and therefore going to have to commit crimes to pay for them.

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 8):
These drugs would be much cheaper. No one fights over cheap stuff.

Oh and most think that drugs are so expensive when in effect most street drugs such as crack and meth are quite cheap at the street lever. I know that a rock of crack goes for under 10bucks..... Street junkies are not committing crimes to afford hundreds of dollars in drugs. They can pretty much stay high all day for under 75 a day....

Most of the street crime is not over power cocaine but for the cheap crack....

If the price of crack is 5 bucks and one guy has some....another will rob that guy of his crack and sell it for 2.50....or use it himself.....

I stand by my original statement that street crime will not decrease just because it is now legal...

GS



Sometimes all you can do is look them in the eye and ask " how much did your mom drink when she was pregnant with you?"
25 MaverickM11 : How would regulation work? Lawyers have had a feel day with tobacco, so how would cocaine, heroin, and even marijuana stack up? What company would ev
26 Post contains links SKYSERVICE_330 : The only way to keep kids from using drugs is to teach them all the cool names they have. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90rw7_6cUDE
27 Baroque : There could be many hidden and unexpected benefits.
28 PPVRA : If you get your crack stolen, what are you to do? Call the cops? That will land you in jail with the thief. There's a strong disincentive to report t
29 Petertenthije : That's not a good excuse. The only reason Amsterdam is the pothole it is, is because it is the place all those repressed foreigners go. Go to nearby
30 TylerDurden : Problem is we're just not that easy to get rid of....a bit like cockroaches... Legalize drugs? I'll go with pot---having never seen any convicing evi
31 Lewis : I have to agree with you. I am pro-legalization for weed, but this might lead young people to use harder drugs in order to seem 'cool' by breaking th
32 RedFlyer : I used to be completely against legalization of drugs because of the fear that legalization would result in its use flourishing among the general popu
33 NIKV69 : This is not accurate. Just because something is legal doesn't mean you will get a spike in usage. Fact is the same people that would use it will do s
34 Post contains links PPVRA : Think of Speak Easies and how they glorified a lifestyle of alcohol consumption. Might we be glorifying drug use with our laws, rather than marginaliz
35 JoeCanuck : Have you ever been to downtown Vancouver? Every single big city, and most small towns including the 50,000 population one I live in, has a seedy down
36 Post contains links Oly720man : So, what makes people take drugs? I haven't and have no intention of, but I don't mix with drug users, even users of socially acceptable substances, A
37 Flymia : From my personal experiences the gateway theory is 100% CORRECT. Almost every single person I know has tried pot at least once or twice. The majority
38 Vikkyvik : See this: Cool. Problem is, I never mentioned a spike in usage. I never mentioned anything about rates of usage at all. And is the 2nd part of that a
39 StarAC17 : Is there concrete evidence to this or is this your opinion. The reason I doubt the legitimacy to the fact that weed is a gateway drug because its ver
40 LTBEWR : First of all, there is a difference between 'soft' drugs, mainly pot, and 'hard' drugs like heroin, cocaine, opium, most hulicigonics and chemical bas
41 Dc9northwest : Mmmkay... Where's the unicorn? Someone, who isn't me, but who I know well has started with... cocaine. Four months ago. He had never previously used
42 JoeCanuck : Where I grew up, sniffing glue and gasoline, drinking Lysol and vanilla extract were the drugs of choice...and all of these things are perfectly lega
43 StarAC17 : What is your sample set for this argument? Your only 19 and you may not realize the reasons that these people are resorting to drugs and if they are
44 WarRI1 : What the answer is, I certainly do not know, What is the cause of all this modern day madness? Are people weaker, or is there too much temptation out
45 WarRI1 : I can understand someone who has depression getting into drugs maybe, maybe also poverty issues etc. I certainly do not understand people who are see
46 RedFlyer : I'll ignore the irony of your question, since government is 2nd only to religion for the amount of death and destruction that has been endured by the
47 Vikkyvik : (Obviously not all drug users are addicts, but...) Addiction does not discriminate between poor and rich, or any such thing. People who are depressed
48 JoeCanuck : Addictions have been around for thousands of years and every culture has had to deal with them. There is nothing new about substance abuse. Marijuana
49 Baroque : What is different is that some have first concluded they can actually prevent use, and then had the power to impose this crazy idea on most of the wo
50 RedFlyer : I think the most suppressive societies have the biggest substance abuse problems. I know from personal observation that alcohol and drug abuse were r
51 Dc9northwest : Let's just say that the only time when I thought I'd die within the hour is when pot was consumed... But that's just me, I guess. I did get a 138 on
52 Yellowstone : Here's the problem with the "gateway theory." It is entirely correct to say that a user of hard drugs is more likely to have smoked marijuana than so
53 DocLightning : I've got a better one. I wonder what percentage of hard drug users drink coffee, tea, or caffeinated soda. Probably most of them, if not all. Further
54 RedFlyer : Excellent read!
55 Lowrider : Assuming you are entirely correct, wouldn't legalizing drugs for the purpose of taxing them simply be taking advantage of a person's natural inclinat
56 DocLightning : I dunno. Again, why is alcohol legal, then? And tobacco? You want to talk about addiction? Tobacco. That's all I have to say about addiction. Tobacco
57 RedFlyer : I don't know if you're aware of this or not, but the government taxes very heavily tobacco and alcohol knowing full well that it is the poor - those
58 DocLightning : In fact, there is one drug where I do favor prohibition: tobacco. Here's my reasoning. Tobacco is rapidly addictive and an addict has to consume a HUG
59 JoeCanuck : It depends on the motives for legalization. If drugs were legalized, the price charged by the government couldn't be any higher than it is now becaus
60 Dc9northwest : Earlier in this thread President Obama was mentioned. He is a president who knows that drugs in moderation are NOT a problem, as he has done some of t
61 UAL757 : Just ask the ShamWOW guy...
62 DocLightning : Oh, yeah. That's the big problem. But at least the cravings tend to go away. But I warn people who have quit: "You cannot smoke even one puff ever ag
63 JoeCanuck : Actually, for the vast majority, the cravings never go away...they merely get less intense...that's why most people go back to smoking eventually. Te
64 Lowrider : I haven't defended those, either. I was only questioning if expanding the list of legal, addictive substances with the intent to profit is ethical. A
65 DocLightning : Far more ethical than destroying the lives of people who use. Do you realize that if you get caught with a joint as a college student, you now have a
66 Lowrider : Yes, I might know a thing or two about becoming a pilot... I am not sure I follow your train of thought. For example, I knew about the drug related o
67 DocLightning : The Constitution has an amendment against "Cruel and Unusual" punishment. You don't think that destroying someone's future for possessing a joint isn
68 StarAC17 : Do elaborate on this. Does this apply to random drug testing which is you test positive you are disqualified from becoming a pilot, which is valid be
69 RedFlyer : I think his argument was that your life isn't ruined if you're busted for a joint, only your desired career. There are plenty of other careers that w
70 JoeCanuck : One problem with de-criminalizing pot is that it does nothing to reduce crime...though it's a good first step...think of it as the gateway drug to sa
71 Lowrider : The way I understand the regs, if you showed positive on a any test related to a to holding a "safety sensitive position" (can't remember if it is De
72 Dc9northwest : Alright. Basically, I was with a friend; it was the first time marijuana actually worked on me. I felt like I entered the fifth dimension, as I could
73 DocLightning : Sure it does. The reason drugs are associated with so much crime is because they are illegal. That raises the amount of risk and it also necessitates
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