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Vick Coming Out Of Jail - Back To The NFL?  
User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11155 posts, RR: 52
Posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2930 times:

The question is simple. Should Vick be allowed back into the NFL when he completes his sentence next month?

I think yes. He has repaid his debt to society, and quite honestly (and this is coming from a dog lover), there are MANY worse crimes out there than dog fighting for which we as a society do not grant eternal punishment.


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52 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCO7e7 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 2848 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2926 times:



Quoting D L X (Thread starter):
I think yes. He has repaid his debt to society, and quite honestly (and this is coming from a dog lover), there are MANY worse crimes out there than dog fighting for which we as a society do not grant eternal punishment.

I couldn't agree more with your statement (and i'm a dog lover as well)

With that said though, what teams do you think are willing to take a chance on him?

I heard on ESPN that the St. Louis Rams and the Seattle Seahawks might be 2 possibilities. Keep in mind, it's unlikely he'll be a starting QB, instead he'll be used on a slash-type package.

Your thought?


User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2926 times:

Absolutely. The NFL lets murders play why not him? I am an animal lover too and think he is despicable but if we ban him there are many that also should be banned.

User currently offlineSW733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6293 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2920 times:

I think yes...he seems to really be sorry, and that is a big part of it. He did a horrible thing, but it's time to move on. The big question is - who wants him? Atlanta owns his rights, but obviously with Matty Ice there now (hate that nickname with all my passion), they do not need him. So who needs a scrambling QB? Not sure...so maybe his future is as a RB, or WR? Everyone needs those. The Cowboys and Bengals love criminals, so...  duck 

If he comes back as a QB, I would say he might end up in Minnesota, Houston, or Jacksonville. Other positions - all bets are off.

I heard some reports on ESPN last night say he may have to prove himself in the CFL before anyone takes a chance on him in the NFL.


User currently offlineYOWza From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 4860 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2919 times:



Quoting CO7e7 (Reply 1):
With that said though, what teams do you think are willing to take a chance on him?

I think we've seen that the NFL almost across the board is willing to deal with players who have had a wide array of skirmishes with the law. The negative light Vick has deflected on the NFL is not even the worst publicity the league has had in recent years so the answer is any team with a young QB that needs a proven backup or any team with injury worries or woes at QB. Hell the raiders might take him on just to entertain their rabid fans.

If by some miracle Toronto got an expansion franchise I would happily pick him up!

YOWza



12A whenever possible.
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12270 posts, RR: 25
Reply 5, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2915 times:



Quoting SW733 (Reply 3):
So who needs a scrambling QB?

Given how their OL plays, I think the Jets need one!

Quoting YOWza (Reply 4):
I think we've seen that the NFL almost across the board is willing to deal with players who have had a wide array of skirmishes with the law.

I wonder if protesters will show up to "dog" his every movement.

Quoting YOWza (Reply 4):
Hell the raiders might take him on just to entertain their rabid fans.

Yep, he'd fit right in with the crowd in OAK.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2908 times:



Quoting Revelation (Reply 5):
I think the Jets need one!

Can you imagine Vic and Plaxico on the Jets! They may even win 8 games.  biggrin 


User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11155 posts, RR: 52
Reply 7, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2908 times:



Quoting Revelation (Reply 5):
I wonder if protesters will show up to "dog" his every movement.

Count on it. Absolutely.

There are two absolutes in this country: don't @#$ with baby, and don't @#$ with dogs and cats. Emotionally, those two crimes are vaulted up to the top of the public hysteria. You'll never live it down.



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User currently offlineLowrider From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 3220 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2893 times:



Quoting D L X (Thread starter):
Should Vick be allowed back into the NFL when he completes his sentence next month?

I would like to see the NFL and all sports leagues institute a no felony rule. You want to get paid 10's of millions to throw a ball, is it too much to ask you try and stay out of trouble? If you can't, they are plenty of other folks who can and would happily take your place.



Proud OOTSK member
User currently offlineAGM100 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 5407 posts, RR: 17
Reply 9, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2890 times:

I think he should , he paid his due. The guy is a football player , what else is he going to do.

Bring him , back let him get on with his life. Hopefully he has grown up , hopefully he will peel himself away from the thug life scene...its a dead end.



You dig the hole .. I fill the hole . 100% employment !
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 10, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2890 times:
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DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting Lowrider (Reply 8):
I would like to see the NFL and all sports leagues institute a no felony rule. You want to get paid 10's of millions to throw a ball, is it too much to ask you try and stay out of trouble? If you can't, they are plenty of other folks who can and would happily take your place.

 checkmark  checkmark  checkmark 

Most intelligent idea I've heard in a long time.

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2884 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 10):
Most intelligent idea I've heard in a long time.

Unfortunatley there aren't that many folks out there that bring the fans and TV viewers. Before the dogfighting and early on Vick was one of the most entertaining athletes to watch. Remember it's a business and the bottom line will always win out over doing the right thing. If this wasn't true, Vick, Pacman and Ray Lewis would be in jail and not playing football.


User currently offlineFxramper From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 7172 posts, RR: 86
Reply 12, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2886 times:
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Hope Goodell gives him the Pete Rose induction; ban him for life.  thumbsdown 

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 13, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2878 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 11):
Unfortunatley there aren't that many folks out there that bring the fans and TV viewers. Before the dogfighting and early on Vick was one of the most entertaining athletes to watch.

I don't think being entertaining and law-abiding are mutually exclusive. And if people are indeed tuning in and watching the sport because of the criminal activities of the athletes, the NFL et al are doing a disservice to us all by presenting such behavior and individuals as role models to kids across the country.

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineYOWza From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 4860 posts, RR: 15
Reply 14, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2872 times:



Quoting Lowrider (Reply 8):
I would like to see the NFL and all sports leagues institute a no felony rule.

Couldn't disagree more. Once somebody has paid their debt to society that should be it. Doesn't matter if they stand to lose a 10 million contract or a 6.85/hr job.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 13):
the NFL et al are doing a disservice to us all by presenting such behavior and individuals as role models to kids across the country.

No idiot parents allowing their kids to idolize such behavior are doing the real disservice.

YOWza



12A whenever possible.
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 15, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2864 times:
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DATABASE EDITOR

Quoting YOWza (Reply 14):
Once somebody has paid their debt to society that should be it. Doesn't matter if they stand to lose a 10 million contract or a 6.85/hr job.

That should be it....in terms of jail time and criminal penalties, yes. But shame on the NFL, NBA, etc for not demanding a reasonable level of professionalism (ie: no felonies) from the players.

Bottom line - it shouldn't be too much to ask the players to avoid committing felonies while under contract and representing their respective teams and organizations.

Quoting YOWza (Reply 14):
No idiot parents allowing their kids to idolize such behavior are doing the real disservice.

That's a factor, too. But it doesn't mean there aren't other big factors at play. And addressing the problems we're talking about....perpetuating bad role models and placing criminal behavior on a pedestal...would be much easier to address than poor parenting.

2H4

[Edited 2009-05-20 10:33:03]


Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2856 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 13):
I don't think being entertaining and law-abiding are mutually exclusive. And if people are indeed tuning in and watching the sport because of the criminal activities of the athletes, the NFL et al are doing a disservice to us all by presenting such behavior and individuals as role models to kids across the country.

You completely missed the point. The sport needs viewers both live and from television to have revenue. Most of the impact players. The ones that are exciting to watch on the field, not off the field are what pay the bills. You look at the problem players like T.O. and the felons like Vick and Lewis they are the upper tier of players. The most talent. They make the game exciting and that equals viewers. It's kind of like Tiger. Do you realize that he brings 100% more viewers that are not even golf fans? Just because of his ability to win, come from behind and make shots that very few people would even attempt is what brings VIEWERS. RATINGS. That is the bottom line. If Tiger was caught in some sort of scandal, or commited a crime after he did his time and satisfied his obligation the PGA Tour would take him back in a second because without him there is no PGA Tour. Nobody but the golf geeks would watch.


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12270 posts, RR: 25
Reply 17, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2855 times:



Quoting AGM100 (Reply 9):
The guy is a football player , what else is he going to do.

Lots of people have to make unwanted career changes. Think of how many airline workers have been laid off and are have had to move on to "Plan B".

Quoting YOWza (Reply 14):
No idiot parents allowing their kids to idolize such behavior are doing the real disservice.

Do you really think parents have control over who their kids idolize? Maybe if you lock them in the basement and never let them out (which I am NOT recommending), but outside of that, once they interact with their peers and with mass media it's all over.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineYOWza From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 4860 posts, RR: 15
Reply 18, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2849 times:



Quoting Revelation (Reply 17):
Do you really think parents have control over who their kids idolize?

Not necessarily who they idolize but they can certainly shape them in their formative years to be upstanding people.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 17):
Maybe if you lock them in the basement and never let them out (which I am NOT recommending), but outside of that, once they interact with their peers and with mass media it's all over.

Hey I was not locked up and grew up playing rugby and other thuggish sports and turned out just fine.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 15):
That should be it....in terms of jail time and criminal penalties, yes. But shame on the NFL, NBA, etc for not demanding a reasonable level of professionalism (ie: no felonies) from the players.

Well as leagues I don't think any commissioner could come out and say that. Certain team owners though have put their foot down and released troublesome players.

YOwza



12A whenever possible.
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2833 times:



Quoting Revelation (Reply 17):
Do you really think parents have control over who their kids idolize

This is not revelant. The era of kids idolizing sports figures is long past. Don't fall into that trap. It's about the money and brining people to watch. How many young kids go to the Superbowl? Not the right demographic.


User currently offlineRedFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4312 posts, RR: 29
Reply 20, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2826 times:



Quoting D L X (Thread starter):
He has repaid his debt to society, and quite honestly (and this is coming from a dog lover), there are MANY worse crimes out there than dog fighting for which we as a society do not grant eternal punishment.



Quoting YOWza (Reply 14):
Once somebody has paid their debt to society that should be it.

Vick has paid his debt to society as far as his criminal (felony) conduct is concerned. The problem, however, is that Vick is/was in a very high-profile job that has an extremely heavy influence on young people. The NFL knows this, which is why their player contracts have clauses regarding maintaining moral standards and avoiding negative publicity. To allow him back on the field is to send a very bad message, which is that money and fame is all one needs to rise above the law and professional conduct. His life is far from over and he will go on to lead a full and productive and, dare I say, money-making life. It just shouldn't be in the NFL.

Quoting YOWza (Reply 4):
The negative light Vick has deflected on the NFL

We only know about the crimes for which he was caught. I'm sure there were plenty of other goings-on that he didn't get caught on and we'll never know about.

Quoting Lowrider (Reply 8):
I would like to see the NFL and all sports leagues institute a no felony rule. You want to get paid 10's of millions to throw a ball, is it too much to ask you try and stay out of trouble? If you can't, they are plenty of other folks who can and would happily take your place.

 checkmark 

Quoting Revelation (Reply 17):
Lots of people have to make unwanted career changes. Think of how many airline workers have been laid off and are have had to move on to "Plan B".

Think of all the pilots that lost their Medical and had to take a desk job. Heck, even sticking on topic, Vick might have lost his career because of an injury. I have no doubt he planned for that, as do most players. In his case, he lost his career because of a moral injury. Too bad. These lost careers happen in every profession. He's still young and I'm sure he still has plenty of money laying around. He needs to move on, as does the NFL.



I'm not a racist...I hate Biden, too.
User currently offlineYOWza From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 4860 posts, RR: 15
Reply 21, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2808 times:



Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 20):
To allow him back on the field is to send a very bad message, which is that money and fame is all one needs to rise above the law and professional conduct.

He was convicted, tried, jailed, and served his time. I'm not sure how that's rising above the law.

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 20):
His life is far from over and he will go on to lead a full and productive and, dare I say, money-making life.

Without football impossible, ever heard the guys speak? Shakespeare he ain't!

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 20):
It just shouldn't be in the NFL.

OK so if a high profile CEO had done the same thing and served his time would you say he should not be allowed back into corporate America and that he should instead join the army to pay his bills?

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 20):
We only know about the crimes for which he was caught. I'm sure there were plenty of other goings-on that he didn't get caught on and we'll never know about.

Wow! Sounds to me like you have a bigger bone to pick with this guy. Since you're sure he has done other things wrong...

YOWza



12A whenever possible.
User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 22, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2805 times:



Quoting D L X (Thread starter):
Should Vick be allowed back into the NFL when he completes his sentence next month?

Absolutely not! Hell, why is it that the NFL has becomes so infamous for players, who have been charged with felonies? DUIs are bad enough, but people who shoot themselves in the shoulder (Plaxico Burress), or who make dog fights (Michael Vick) are really hurting the league, which is why I feel that College Football is much more better than the NFL in recent years, also because as amateurs, they still have to earn their education and don't have money influencing their judgement.

No, the NFL should start instituting a zero-tolerance policy to clean up the league. After all, as in every sport, those are role models for our kids in some way, and they have to stick to certain rules of behaviour, which includes staying the hell away from crime, otherwise, our kids may think that this is perfectly accepted no matter what punishment they get. That being said, a zero tolerance policy would probably eliminate quite a lot of players from the NFL, and I sincerely doubt that Roger Goodell would even think of doing such a thing. Nevertheless, Michael Vick should be banned from the NFL for life.


User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2802 times:



Quoting LTU932 (Reply 22):
No, the NFL should start instituting a zero-tolerance policy to clean up the league. After all, as in every sport, those are role models for our kids in some way, and they have to stick to certain rules of behaviour, which includes staying the hell away from crime, otherwise, our kids may think that this is perfectly accepted no matter what punishment they get. That being said, a zero tolerance policy would probably eliminate quite a lot of players from the NFL, and I sincerely doubt that Roger Goodell would even think of doing such a thing. Nevertheless, Michael Vick should be banned from the NFL for life.

You have no idea how professional sports in the US works if you make this statement. Look at the big money makers. MLB, NBA and NFL. Take the stars and you will see they are far from role models for young kids. If you want to clean up the bad element fine but the quality of play and # of viewers would be cut in half if not more and that will not be allowed to happen.

Look at some of the highest paid and most talented players from the last few years and tell me if you want them being role models.

Manny Ramirez
Raw Lewis
T.O.
Allen Iverson
Dennis Rodman
Kobe Bryant

The days of Micheal Jordon and Derek Jeter are behind us. It will be tough to find a player like Jeter who can bring the crowds and still have the wholesome image who is a team player.


User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 24, posted (5 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2800 times:



Quoting CO7e7 (Reply 1):
I heard on ESPN that the St. Louis Rams and the Seattle Seahawks might be 2 possibilities.

We, Seattle fans politely decline. We don't want him.

Quoting Lowrider (Reply 8):
I would like to see the NFL and all sports leagues institute a no felony rule. You want to get paid 10's of millions to throw a ball, is it too much to ask you try and stay out of trouble? If you can't, they are plenty of other folks who can and would happily take your place.

 checkmark  Hear, hear! Truer words never spoken!

Quoting Fxramper (Reply 12):
Hope Goodell gives him the Pete Rose induction

That would settle things once for all!

Quoting Revelation (Reply 17):
Think of how many airline workers have been laid off and are have had to move on to "Plan B".

Bad analogy.  no 

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 23):
It will be tough to find a player like Jeter who can bring the crowds and still have the wholesome image who is a team player.

 rotfl  You kidding me?! Jeter is just as corrupt, too.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
25 NIKV69 : Oh please you can make an argument for MJ as well since he liked to gamble heavily but at least they aren't felons.
26 Par13del : No, because as far as most are concerned he worked for his money and made a mistake, professional athletes are just joes like us who by some fluke ar
27 Stratosphere : Yep you are absolutely right...It's all about the money aint it? You can be a total thug off the field ; Hell you can be a total thug on the field an
28 D L X : No it doesn't. It sends the message that no matter who you are, rich or poor, if you commit a crime, you're going to have to repay your debt to socie
29 RedFlyer : You don't think his money kept him from getting a worse punishment? You don't think his fame (even if it was earned on the field) is giving him anoth
30 DeltAirlines : The thing that aggrevates me the most about the Vick situation is that he was sent to prison for 2 years or so for having a bunch of dogs fight each o
31 ExFATboy : A corporation hiring him is a contract between two private entities. But as a consumer, I'd no longer do business with that company, and if I were a
32 YOWza : So Vick's dog fighting is more than just a mistake? NOBODY gets into the NFL by fluke. Weights, drill, plyometrics, book time, video time sacrificing
33 LTU932 : I know that things aren't exactly peachy in US Sports, but let's face it: Regardless of anything, kids WILL look up to sports stars and consider them
34 D L X : Actually, his money and his fame probably increased his punishment. Of all the people in the conspiracy, he got the biggest punishment, though he was
35 YOWza : That's fair enough the question becomes where does one draw the line... So tell me this would you stop following the NFL altogether? No but had that
36 AirframeAS : Oh, really?! Ok, then you try out for the NFL (or any professional league for that matter) and see if you can even make the team. If so, you can come
37 LTBEWR : The dogfighting that Vick was involved with very deeply has many felonous criminals involved in it, including street gang members and leaders, organiz
38 RedFlyer : There's no doubt he's repaid his debt to society for breaking the law in a manner considered to be a felony. But there's also professional consequenc
39 Lowrider : And he will be restored to society, free to do almost whatever he wants. There is a difference, however, between paying a criminal penalty, and livin
40 D L X : Translation: because parents suck and refuse to be the role model to their kids and raise their kids right, we must punish people who are not actuall
41 RedFlyer : I'm sure there may be ex-felons on the ramp, but do their employers know about it? Are you saying an American airline would knowingly hire a person w
42 Revelation : That's a pretty selective list. On the other hand, I have a pretty hard time coming up with somebody who is a good role model. Which brings up the po
43 D L X : Yes. It all depends on the felony, and probably how long ago the felony occurred. Well, with that wording, I agree! But just because there are many,
44 Par13del : Suggest you re-read my post That statement was in response to the question about a CEO, as far as most persons are concerned, other people work for t
45 AirframeAS : No need to. Your statement is still absurd to the fullest. You cannot compare a professional sports player to the average joe, period.
46 Par13del : I don't, but unfortunately, a lot of folks do, see and hear it all the time , and until those flawed assumptions are addressed, pro athletes will alw
47 AirframeAS : Wait a second... are you changing your stance now?? You just said they are average joes just like us..... You're now making no sense.
48 RedFlyer : I'd like to know which airlines have or continue to knowingly hire people convicted of felonies and who did jail time, and who are allowed to work in
49 Stratosphere : Don't know about a regular basis but NWA sure as hell did when they took back convicted felon and DUI flyer Norman Lyle Prouse. Not only did he do ja
50 AirframeAS : WN had a mechanic in PHX who was convicted for something, and he continued to work for them while on house arrest/lock-up. I heard this back in 2002
51 D L X : I don't have that information. Now, your turn. I'd like you to tell me which airlines have a hard rule against hiring anyone who has been to jail for
52 RedFlyer : I wasn't trying to be cute by asking that question of you. You said airlines would hire a felon who did time. I was surprised to read that. I didn't
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