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Engine Terminology  
User currently offlineRadarbeam From Canada, joined Mar 2002, 1310 posts, RR: 4
Posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 786 times:

A quick question for you,

Lately, I've been wondering what the 2.0 litres or 2.2 litres means when refering to an engine. For example my engine is a 2.0L DOHC 150HP.

Thanks,

Radarbeam

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 772 times:

2.0 liters - The capacity of the cylinders in the engine.

DOHC - Double overhead camshaft . This is the device that lets the valves move which lets the fuel in and the exhaust out. And there are two of them.

150HP - The engine creates the equivalent power that would take 150 horses to generate.


User currently offlineAdam84 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 1400 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 772 times:

Its the displacement. The amount of empty space in all your cylinders when they are at the bottom of their stroke.



User currently offlineAerorobnz From Rwanda, joined Feb 2001, 7209 posts, RR: 13
Reply 3, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 761 times:

2000 cubic centimetres or the nearest displacement to it...eg 1998cc
in general a bigger naturally aspirated engine can produce more power...but there are always exceptions..


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 760 times:

You may also hear displacement written as cubic inches. About 61 cubic inches = 1 liter. So, you engine is also about 122 cubic inches.

User currently offlineIllini_152 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1000 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 746 times:

And if you want to get real technical, displacement is the bore * stroke * # of cylinders. Bore is the inside diameter of the cylinder, and stroke is the distance that the piston travels during one revolution. A larger engine will produce more torque for a given RPM, but there are ways to get more power out of a small normally asperated engine. These generally involve winding them to a real high RPM.

Indy cars manage 800hp out of a 1.9L engine. Of course, they're turbocharged and running on pure ethenol. And turning at around 14,000 rpm.

Interestingly, horsepower is a fabricated number that Watt came up with based on how much coal he thought a mine Mule could haul in a givin time- 33,000 lb-ft/minute. An interesting site for questions like this is How Stuff Works-

http://www.howstuffworks.com/horsepower.htm



Happy contrails - I support B747Skipper and Jetguy
User currently offlineFordlover From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 194 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 730 times:

Not quite right Illini_152, you left out pi. Displacement is a volume, so the formula is ((1/2 bore)squared x pi) x stroke x number of cylinders. And the more, the merrier!  Big thumbs up

User currently offlineNKP S2 From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1714 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 711 times:

Righto 'Fordlover' on the displacement calcultion...and I agree there's no replacement for displacement- in a pragmatic sense anyway. It should be noted that advertised Horsepower and Torque specs do not always tell the full story- They're just a "snapshot" at the peak of a curve and may not be indicative of the shape of the curve and how much usable power is available in most driving conditions. Generally, an engine with a broader powerband will be more satisfying to drive than one with a more "peaky" powerband. As the old hotrod adage goes: "Horsepower sells cars - Torque wins races". Horespower IS torque...but it depends on how effectively it is applied.

User currently offlineIllini_152 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1000 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 698 times:

Whoops- shows me to proofread these things before I post them; think one think, type another. Talk about the brain fart, I was thinking area x bore, and you are correct about the area being pi R^2.

Couldn't agree with you more about displacement; give me a P&W R4360 Wasp Major. he he he; biggest piston engine ever built. 28 cylinders, 5.75" bore, 6" stroke. Some put out as much as 4500 hp.



Happy contrails - I support B747Skipper and Jetguy
User currently offlineRadarbeam From Canada, joined Mar 2002, 1310 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (12 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 693 times:

Thanks guys for all the infos

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