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Visa Credit Card Without Microchip In USA  
User currently offlineF.pier From Italy, joined Aug 2000, 1523 posts, RR: 9
Posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4563 times:

I've already realized that my credit card, a Visa valid thru the end of 2011 doesn't have the microchip and it only has the magnetic stripe.
Here in Italy I can use it everywhere, but within 10 days I'm going to the US and now I'm in doubt. Is it ok?

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7760 posts, RR: 16
Reply 1, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4557 times:

You will be fine. My 2 cards (CC and debit) are both chipless and I haven't seen very many places that take them.


Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineAfterburner From Indonesia, joined Jun 2005, 1209 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4549 times:

I believe most merchant in the world are still using magnetic type credit card machines. However, more and more merchants have been using microchip credit card machines. In Indonesia, iirc, from 2010 all new credit cards issued have to has microchips.

User currently offlineF.pier From Italy, joined Aug 2000, 1523 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 4541 times:



Quoting Afterburner (Reply 2):
In Indonesia, iirc, from 2010 all new credit cards issued have to has microchips.

Here in Italy, too. Since January the 1st 2009 all new credit cards have the microchip, but mine was issued in december 2008. The bank asked me if I wanted to change it, but I forgot to answer......


User currently offlineWingman From Seychelles, joined May 1999, 2215 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 4529 times:

Welcome to the United States of the Stone Age. In the emerging consumer technologies such as telephony and payments we lag woefully behind Europe. There are essentially no merchants in the US that operate payment systems using chip platforms. We are committed 100% to the mag stripe for now. Contactless may emerge as our next generation bypassing mag altogether at some point. But suffice to say you and your Italiano mag stripe will be welcome with open arms wherever you go. Enjoy your trip and please spend lots of money. We are broke.

User currently offlineBongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3535 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 4497 times:



Quoting Wingman (Reply 4):



Quoting Wingman (Reply 4):
Welcome to the United States of the Stone Age. In the emerging consumer technologies such as telephony and payments we lag woefully behind Europe. There are essentially no merchants in the US that operate payment systems using chip platforms. We are committed 100% to the mag stripe for now. Contactless may emerge as our next generation bypassing mag altogether at some point. But suffice to say you and your Italiano mag stripe will be welcome with open arms wherever you go. Enjoy your trip and please spend lots of money. We are broke.

On my recent trip to California, I noted the almost total lack of security and scrutiny for credit card transactions. On one or two occasions I was asked for photo id to back up card, on all others even my signature wasn't checked.
I'm sure that I would have passed the photo id test, regardless of how the photo looked.
Many time I felt tempted to sign as "M Mouse" just to see if it was ever picked up.


User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8792 posts, RR: 24
Reply 6, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 4489 times:

Card issuers in the US have actually been removing security features in spite of increasing fraud. My understanding is that 4% of all credit/debit card transactions are fraudulent.

Ten years ago, my bank had your photo printed on the front of your card - a simple way of ensuring that "you are you". Aparently they got a lot of complaints about it and the pictures have been removed.

Right now I am converting my family to a cash system. I'm getting rid of all our debit cards, and will keep only a couple of credit cards for travel purposes.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlinePellegrine From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2362 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 4453 times:



Quoting Bongodog1964 (Reply 5):
On my recent trip to California, I noted the almost total lack of security and scrutiny for credit card transactions. On one or two occasions I was asked for photo id to back up card, on all others even my signature wasn't checked.
I'm sure that I would have passed the photo id test, regardless of how the photo looked.
Many time I felt tempted to sign as "M Mouse" just to see if it was ever picked up.

Most big retailers just want to make transactions as quickly as possible. Swipe, swipe, swipe, that's it. I think you'll find only small businesses and pricey boutique stores which may by fraud targets will actually use security features.

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 6):
Ten years ago, my bank had your photo printed on the front of your card - a simple way of ensuring that "you are you". Aparently they got a lot of complaints about it and the pictures have been removed.

Bank of America does this by default for new checking accts, you have to tell them if you want a photoless debit card. Personally I do not like my photo on a credit card which is easily lost. Fraud is the bank's problem anyway, not mine the customer's.



oh boy!!!
User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 3942 posts, RR: 28
Reply 8, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4440 times:



Quoting Wingman (Reply 4):
Contactless may emerge as our next generation bypassing mag altogether at some point.

Actually, one thing does not preclude the other. Contactless technology in the U.S. is based on the magnetic stripe (i.e., you basically just have an antenna that transmits the exact same information that is on the magnetic stripe). Despite lagging in terms of penetration compared with the U.S., contactless technology in Europe is (or will be) based on the chip card (i.e., bi-directional communication, etc.) so in theory it is much safer.

Quoting Bongodog1964 (Reply 5):
I noted the almost total lack of security and scrutiny for credit card transactions.

Heck, credit cards is nothing. The lack of security in other types of electronic transactions in the U.S. is mind-boggling. Do you know that in the U.S. if, for any reason, I write you a check to pay for something I owe you, just with the information printed on the front of the check you can pay your utility bills, your taxes, your college tuition or even just make withdrawals, all from my checking account?

Plus, don't get me started with the lack of security in Internet Banking.

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 6):
Ten years ago, my bank had your photo printed on the front of your card - a simple way of ensuring that "you are you". Aparently they got a lot of complaints about it and the pictures have been removed.

Bank of America still allows you to do that on debit cards (not sure about credit cards).



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (4 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 4406 times:



Quoting Bongodog1964 (Reply 5):
Many time I felt tempted to sign as "M Mouse" just to see if it was ever picked up.

A coworker at my last employer would sign anything he purchased with a P-Card (essentially a University issued state Visa card) as either "Mickey", "Mouse", "MM", or "MMouse"

The only time the signature ever matters is if you contest the charge. Another interesting security anomoly is that in the US a merchant accepting Visa or Mastercard for payment may not require ID as a condition of completeing the sale. -- a merchant isn't even suposed to ask, but if they do, you decline and they refuse to process the transaction they can create all kinds of issues between them and their merchant bank/Visa.

Usually, though I just hand my DL and Visa card over together.

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineAfterburner From Indonesia, joined Jun 2005, 1209 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (4 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 4358 times:

I have a credit card that also functions as a cash card. I has a magnetic stripe and a chip, and has contact-less feature. For regular transaction either the stripe or the chip can be used. The contact-less feature is used when the card is functioning as a cash card. We top up the cash card by cash or debiting from the credit card account. The cash card function comes handy when we often pay for petty spending like toll road charges, parking charges, etc.

User currently offlineBananaBoY From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 1574 posts, RR: 23
Reply 11, posted (4 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 4298 times:



Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 6):
Ten years ago, my bank had your photo printed on the front of your card - a simple way of ensuring that "you are you". Aparently they got a lot of complaints about it and the pictures have been removed.

I read somewhere that there was quite a lot of evidence to show that this security feature was not that successful. They set up tests using other peoples photos (and a monkey once) and it wasn't spotted by the merchant.

I have a credit card with both a chip and also contactless capability. I just haven't found a shop that can do the contactless thing. Apparently, you can only spend up to £10GBP just by waving the card at the machine. Not a bad idea I guess, but now that chip and PIN is everywhere, I wonder if it will take off in a big way, seeing as entering 4 numbers is pretty quick anyway.


Mark



All my life, I've been kissing, your top lip 'cause your bottom one's missing
User currently offlineGemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5621 posts, RR: 6
Reply 12, posted (4 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 4296 times:



Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 6):

Right now I am converting my family to a cash system.

So what are you going to do when cash is withdrawn? I hear the plan here is to star to phase out cash in 2021, probably take to 2030 to actually do it.

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlineHawaiian717 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3188 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (4 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4248 times:



Quoting BananaBoY (Reply 11):
I just haven't found a shop that can do the contactless thing. Apparently, you can only spend up to £10GBP just by waving the card at the machine. Not a bad idea I guess, but now that chip and PIN is everywhere, I wonder if it will take off in a big way, seeing as entering 4 numbers is pretty quick anyway.

It's the opposite in the US. I've never seen a shop setup to do anything with a smart chip, but I have seen a handful of places, mostly chain stores, that have the terminals that have readers for the contactless cards (they use RFID technology).

American Express advertised the smart chip as a major feature when they first launched their Blue card, but it's gone nowhere and American Express is now using RFID chips in some of their cards instead, including Blue.

I think RFID credit cards (and passports) are a remarkably bad idea, considering how badly wireless security has been done before (WEP being a prime example). I have a credit card with a RFID chip in it, the first thing I did was went to the bank's website and disabled the contactless feature (while the chip itself is still enabled, the bank would reject contactless transactions), and the second thing I did was figure out where the chip was in the card and hit it with a hammer a couple of times.

Regarding the signature thing, I've noticed in the past couple of years some chains don't bother getting a signature for small transactions (maybe under $20).


User currently offlineTUNisia From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1844 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (4 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4248 times:



Quoting Wingman (Reply 4):
There are essentially no merchants in the US that operate payment systems using chip platforms.

Here in the Northeast a lot of merchants that I frequent utilize PayPass and Express Pay by AMEX... but not all cards from that issuer feature the chip... which is odd!



Someday the sun will shine down on me in some faraway place - Mahalia Jackson
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