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Large Hadron Collider Back After Year Of Repairs  
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10744 posts, RR: 38
Posted (4 years 5 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 2359 times:

Surprisingly the Large Hadron Collider did not make the news this time as CERN scientists have slowly re-started the particle collider for a second time.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...science/physics/article6892300.ece

“It’s the beginning of a very well-planned and cautious switch-on,” Brian Foster, a particle physicist from the University of Oxford, said.


There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineContinental From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5499 posts, RR: 19
Reply 1, posted (4 years 5 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2298 times:

So does that mean we may be able to make antimatter soon? Hopefully the camerlengo doesn't get a hold of this stuff!

But seriously, that is cool news. I can't wait to see what news this thing will produce.


User currently offlineJER757 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 350 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 5 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2265 times:

Oh my god... cue the Daily Mail headline: D-day is coming, the world is going to end!!!

Good to see it's finally going to be up and running again. Let's just hope they have more luck this time!



Gale force fog... don't you love it?
User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 3, posted (4 years 5 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2250 times:

Hooray! It'll be a big step forward for science if we get to know more about Dark Matter and discover the Higgs Boson. However, the benefit of this knowledge is not likely to result in anything palpable for another generation or two. It's truly a gift from our times to our children's children, much like most fundamental research.

The Hubble Space Telescope is a good example - amazing images of the Universe - we've learned so much about its evolution and scale. Hubble also discovered Black Holes, an unforeseen bonus. Perhaps in a few millenia we'll be sailing the Cosmos as a result of it, but for now, it's just a peek at a great mystery.

[Edited 2009-10-28 18:54:29 by comorin]

User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 18713 posts, RR: 58
Reply 4, posted (4 years 5 months 4 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 2210 times:

Wait! They can't turn it on until 2012!  duck 

User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10744 posts, RR: 38
Reply 5, posted (4 years 5 months 4 weeks ago) and read 2183 times:



Quoting JER757 (Reply 2):
the Daily Mail

I would rather name it the Daily Fail.  Big grin



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineMyt332 From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 9112 posts, RR: 71
Reply 6, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2169 times:

Sadly I read the thread title as 'Large Hardon Collider'.  eyepopping 


One Life, Live it.
User currently offlineNa From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10369 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 2163 times:

It´ll be some time still until they do the real tests with it - the collision of 300 billion atoms (or electrons or protons?) at 99,99999...% speed of light at minus twohundredseventysomething degrees C. I read a long article in Germany´s best newspaper "Die Zeit" last weekend about it. They said it´ll create a temperature 100.000 times higher than the sun - but forgot to ask what this means for the LHC.

User currently offlinePlymSpotter From Spain, joined Jun 2004, 11574 posts, RR: 61
Reply 8, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2124 times:



Quoting Na (Reply 7):
They said it´ll create a temperature 100.000 times higher than the sun - but forgot to ask what this means for the LHC.

I guess if a large hole appears, then we'll know the consequences. Could be a whole new side to tourist promotion - Switzerland, the country which looks like it's favorite cheese.



...love is just a camouflage for what resembles rage again...
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2103 times:



Quoting Myt332 (Reply 6):
Sadly I read the thread title as 'Large Hardon Collider'. eyepopping

I always read it that way too, whenever there is a thread about it.


User currently offlineA346Dude From Canada, joined Nov 2004, 1268 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 2093 times:



Quoting Comorin (Reply 3):
It's truly a gift from our times to our children's children, much like most fundamental research.

I'm sure they will appreciate that. Maybe it will help them pay off the enormous debt we are leaving them too.  Silly



You know the gear is up and locked when it takes full throttle to taxi to the terminal.
User currently offlineNoWorries From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 539 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2007 times:

I'm sure they want to be cautious -- on the other hand they probably want to get back to business -- there's still an outside chance that the Tevatron at Fermilab could find the Higgs first.

User currently offlineElite From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2006, 2786 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 2005 times:

While many people appreciate this amazing piece of technology, I am sure most people don't even know what it does... I remember reading about this last year - has it been a year already?

User currently offlineAustrianZRH From Austria, joined Aug 2007, 1342 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1998 times:

Great news.

Have a look at the live webcams Big grin http://www.cyriak.co.uk/lhc/lhc-webcams.html



WARNING! The post above should be taken with a grain of salt! Furthermore, it may be slightly biased towards A.
User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 14, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1933 times:

It'll never work.

Since switching it on will destroy the Universe, in our parallel universe we will have survived because bizarre, low probability accidents will prevent it from being switched on (as per Quantum Theory).

This theory is being circulated by some distinguished theoretical physicists, as per The Telegraph:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/s...e-held-back-by-its-own-future.html

It's like God doesn't want it to happen...


User currently offlineFrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3613 posts, RR: 11
Reply 15, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1913 times:



Quoting Comorin (Reply 14):

 Silly

Talk about a ridiculous theory...

I'm no physicist, but here's mine: The LHC is the largest and most complex machine in the world, and expecting everything to work as it should from the word go is madness.

There will probably be a lot more problems they'll have to deal with before everything can run smoothly and they can start the proper experiments.

(And if that theory was true, it would mean the 787 and A400 will never fly...  duck  )



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 16, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1901 times:



Quoting Francoflier (Reply 15):
The LHC is the largest and most complex machine in the world, and expecting everything to work as it should from the word go is madness.

There will probably be a lot more problems they'll have to deal with before everything can run smoothly and they can start the proper experiments.

 checkmark 

Quoting Francoflier (Reply 15):
And if that theory was true, it would mean the 787 and A400 will never fly..

No problem! Engineers from the future are already here amongst us fixing those stubborn planes  Wink


User currently offlineNoWorries From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 539 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1867 times:



Quoting Francoflier (Reply 15):
Talk about a ridiculous theory...

It seems ridiculous to me as well, but one point to keep in mind is that quantum physics can, in a sense, be thought of at two levels -- mechanics and interpretation.

The mechanics consist of all of the various experiments and the theories that describe their outcome. It's very sophisticated mathematically -- the complete system is referred to as the "Standard Model" and makes very accurate characterizations. The only major missing piece is the Higgs field and its boson(s).

The "problem" is that is nondeterministic, it is statistical -- not due to lack of information, but quite literally all outcomes are possible until one is "observed." This has caused some great physicist (for example Einstein) to reject the whole system. He once quipped that God does not play dice.

Most physicist find it impossible to reject it, so they look for an "interpretation" to restore some determinism. The largest group ascribes to the minimalist Copenhagen interpretation (Neils Bohr) which simply states that the act of observation causes a definite state to arise. There are blocks of physicist who can't accept that and look for alternate "interpretations". Many-words, many-minds, consistent-histories, multiverse, are just some of the many interpretation's that are the subjects of spirited debate and dozens of books.

Physicists all believe in the same set of mechanics so they can share experiments and build things like the LHC, but -- in their minds favor different interpretations. I'm sure these particular physicists understand the mechanics and yet firmly believe in their particular interpretation that gives rise to this very strange prediction.


User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 18, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1846 times:



Quoting NoWorries (Reply 17):

Excellent summary. (checkmark}

Trouble is, neither Quantum Mech nor even Probability Theory are concepts that are experientally understandable. We keep trying to explain complex mathematical theories in easy to understand terms, but our poor brains are not wired for that. Feynman and Sagan got that; Hawking and Greene did not. Trampolines to explain space-time distortion? Bah!!

Just my 2 cents...


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10744 posts, RR: 38
Reply 19, posted (4 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 1764 times:

It was a defective piece of metallic cable that had shut down the Large Hadron Collider.
The repairs cost £30 Millions.

"It was a very small piece, but it did immense damage," says Steve Myers, Director of particle accelerators at CERN near Geneva.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/20.../nov/01/cern-large-hadron-collider

 Wow!

Let's hope there will be no more incident and the Big Machine will be able to do what it was built for.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 20, posted (4 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1643 times:

French bird drops a piece of baguette today on the LHC. This was an unfilled (no chocolate) piece that fortunately did not cause a shut down.

http://scitech.blogs.cnn.com/2009/11...e-toting-bird-stalls-atom-smasher/


I'm a-telling you guys that this is the hand of God and He does not want the Collider to become operational. Laugh at me at your own risk.


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10744 posts, RR: 38
Reply 21, posted (4 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1639 times:



Quoting Comorin (Reply 20):

Thank you for posting this new piece of LHC news.

What will be the next episode for the LHC?
It looks like the Big Machine has definitetly got some karma there...  Wow!



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 22, posted (4 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1627 times:



Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 21):
Quoting Comorin (Reply 20):

Thank you for posting this new piece of LHC news.

What will be the next episode for the LHC?
It looks like the Big Machine has definitetly got some karma there... Wow!

You're welcome!

I think the next steps are just a gradual series of steps to the LHC becoming operational by this month end at low energies. It will be shut down again later in 2010 and then it will go full blast at 7 TeV. And even then, the petabytes of data produced will take many years to process.

The race is on between the LHC and the Tevatron in the search for the Higgs Boson - whoever is first, Mankind is still the winner.


User currently offlineNoWorries From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 539 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (4 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1606 times:



Quoting Comorin (Reply 22):
The race is on between the LHC and the Tevatron in the search for the Higgs Boson

There've been intermittent rumors for the last year or so that it was found at the Tevatron. The Higgs might well be within the available energy range of the Tevatron, but even if it is, the LHC has much greater beam intensity (more collisions), so the odds favor the LHC as time goes on.
Even if the LHC should lose that race, there are still big fish to fry -- like looking for signs of super symmetry --- most string theories require it, so finding it might be a good sign.


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