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Haiti: What's The Future?  
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19420 posts, RR: 58
Posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 4631 times:

Before the recent disaster in Haiti, it was already the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere.

The Hatian Presidential Palace, a seeming mirage of power and order in a city of sprawling slums, is now a ruin:


Even before the quake, Haiti didn't have much going for it:


But now most of those slums lie in ruin. Bodies are literally lined up --sometimes stacked on top of each-other-- in the street. There are no words to describe the depths of the tragedy.

When the smoke has cleared and the relief workers have gone away, Haiti will lie a tropical paradise wasteland. I don't see how the Hatian government can continue to function. What will happen in Haiti? Will it descend into complete anarchy? Will warlords arise until one becomes a dictator? More worrisome, in times of desperation, will a group like Al Qaeda, with money and promises of eternal paradise, find a warm home there?

Discuss...

59 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 1, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 4614 times:

Perhaps France may have to intervene in this case. Since French islands are nearby (along with French Guayana), it could be possible that Haiti decides to become part of France again, maybe as a COM (collectivité d'outre-mer, overseas collective), giving Haiti political authority similar to the one the regions on the French mainland and Corsica have.

If not, then perhaps a French intervention similar to the one in Côte d'Ivoire would be in order. In any case, I feel that France will get in some way involved, if not take responsibility for helping a fellow francophone country.


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 2, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4599 times:



Quoting LTU932 (Reply 1):
it could be possible that Haiti decides to become part of France again

It takes two to tango. Would France be interested?


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 3, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4587 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
More worrisome, in times of desperation, will a group like Al Qaeda, with money and promises of eternal paradise, find a warm home there?

Haiti would cease to exist if that happened. The proximity to the US would mean Haiti would get crushed and the Dominican Republic would suddenly take over all of Hispaniola.

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 1):
Perhaps France may have to intervene in this case. Since French islands are nearby (along with French Guayana), it could be possible that Haiti decides to become part of France again, maybe as a COM (collectivité d'outre-mer, overseas collective), giving Haiti political authority similar to the one the regions on the French mainland and Corsica have.

Given the costs of German Reunification, I just don't know if the French would want to deal with the issues surrounding integrating Haiti into the Republic, especially in this economic climate with that racist for a President.

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 1):
If not, then perhaps a French intervention similar to the one in Côte d'Ivoire would be in order. In any case, I feel that France will get in some way involved, if not take responsibility for helping a fellow francophone country.

I almost think US intervention is more likely.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineGrahamHill From France, joined Mar 2007, 2810 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4560 times:



Quoting LTU932 (Reply 1):
Perhaps France may have to intervene in this case. Since French islands are nearby (along with French Guayana), it could be possible that Haiti decides to become part of France again, maybe as a COM (collectivité d'outre-mer, overseas collective), giving Haiti political authority similar to the one the regions on the French mainland and Corsica have.

I don't think it's going to happen. First because it is still a country ruled by an official government. And the executive power is still alive. Therefore it will be their (the people and the government) decision to request it.

Then Haiti was one of the first French colony to take its independance. That was in 1804, when Napoleon had to withdrew his army after the revolution. Going back to France after more than 200 years of independance would be quite awkward and - to me - not doable. And anyway, I don't think Haitians would like to be part of France again.

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 1):
In any case, I feel that France will get in some way involved, if not take responsibility for helping a fellow francophone country.

We do help, but I don't think we will take more responsibility than the others. As I said, this country is almost as old as the US, so our connections faded away long time ago. That said, we sent plenty of people to help (400 people from Sécurité Civile, food, field hospitals with 60 nurses and doctors, two Navy ships will bring construction materials and helicopters. And of course, money).



"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8795 posts, RR: 24
Reply 5, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4555 times:



Quoting LTU932 (Reply 1):
Perhaps France may have to intervene in this case. Since French islands are nearby (along with French Guayana), it could be possible that Haiti decides to become part of France again, maybe as a COM (collectivité d'outre-mer, overseas collective), giving Haiti political authority similar to the one the regions on the French mainland and Corsica have.

Haiti has 10 million people, nearly all poor as hell. I suspect that the French taxpayers might revive the guillotine if their government suggests for France to take responsibility for it.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently offlineAM744 From Mexico, joined Jun 2001, 1773 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4541 times:



Quoting LTU932 (Reply 1):
it could be possible that Haiti decides to become part of France again

I've read that Guadeloupe actually drains money from France. Plus, what would France win from that 'reunification'?


User currently offlineEZEIZA From Argentina, joined Aug 2004, 4964 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4531 times:

Unfortunately, I fear Haiti will continue to be the poorest country in the Americas and one of the poorest in the world. They already depend a lot (prior to the recent tragedy) on foreign aid of all sorts, half the population can't read or write, the life expectancy is of 60 years, infrastructure is a mess ... and now the quake probably destroyed whatever was left. Things don't look too bright for the future  Sad


Carp aunque ganes o pierdas ...
User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11220 posts, RR: 52
Reply 8, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4531 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
will a group like Al Qaeda, with money and promises of eternal paradise, find a warm home there?

Not a lot of Islamist extremists in Haiti, an almost exclusively Catholic nation.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 3):
I almost think US intervention is more likely.

Most likely, but not very likely.



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User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 9, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4520 times:



Quoting D L X (Reply 8):

Most likely, but not very likely.

As I said, more likely  Wink



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineAGM100 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 5407 posts, RR: 16
Reply 10, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4485 times:



Quoting EZEIZA (Reply 7):
fear Haiti will continue to be the poorest country in the Americas and one of the poorest in the world.

Foreign aid does nothing except exacerbate the problem over time it seems. Your left with a population that does not work upward to sustain itself . I am not talking about a stock exchange ... I am talking about the basics ... like food production , basic infrastructure , basic social fabric and security. Remove the foreign aid and what is left in Haiti for the people ?

They seem incapable of progress ? Why ... I don't get it I guess. But no matter my company made a good donation to the relief effort today ..the people sure need help.



You dig the hole .. I fill the hole . 100% employment !
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10893 posts, RR: 37
Reply 11, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4462 times:

Why would France have to take care of this? They wanted to do away from France so why should France take them back? France took in Baby Doc after he fled Haiti and gave him shelter with a luxury lifestyle on the Riviera and Paris.

Also think of these dictators, Papa Doc and Baby Doc how awful they were and how many people they tortured and killed. Haiti was not a fun place to be an opponent to the Duvaliers regime.

I hear Duvalier want to go back to Haiti now and be in power again.I doubt it would help the situation at all. I think it would rather deteriorate it.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineGrahamHill From France, joined Mar 2007, 2810 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4453 times:

Quoting AGM100 (Reply 10):
They seem incapable of progress ? Why ... I don't get it I guess

As soon as France left Haiti (which was called Saint-Domingue at that time), dictactors took power and since 1804, there has been a long succession of Coup d'état that plundged the country into persistent instability and poverty.

If you add on top of the that all the natural disasters, like Earthquakes (one very serious every century), hurricanes (4 in 2008), floods provoked by massive deforestation, etc., that keep on destroying the little that can be rebuilt, you have a country that is struggling to develop.

[Edited 2010-01-14 13:16:49]


"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19420 posts, RR: 58
Reply 13, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4437 times:



Quoting N1120A (Reply 3):
the Dominican Republic would suddenly take over all of Hispaniola.

The DR wants nothing to do with Haiti. The Haiti/DR border makes US/Mexico look like the border between Iowa and Nebraska. Haitians try over and over to get into the DR, only to get blocked or deported.

That's the problem, nobody wants Haiti. It's just poor. No resources, no money, no industry.

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 5):

Haiti has 10 million people, nearly all poor as hell. I suspect that the French taxpayers might revive the guillotine if their government suggests for France to take responsibility for it.

 checkmark 

Quoting D L X (Reply 8):

Not a lot of Islamist extremists in Haiti, an almost exclusively Catholic nation.

Remember, Haiti wasn't Catholic from the get-go. It got that way from immigration and missionaries. It's chaotic, it's near the U.S., and I'm sure that there are a lot of Haitians there who are just about fed up with God. I agree that it's not incredibly probable, but I still wouldn't discount the possibility that a new religion and a new order could enter.

Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 4):
First because it is still a country ruled by an official government. And the executive power is still alive

For the moment, but reports are that the gunfire has already started. My guess is that a lot of services that would typically be provided by a government in a civilized country are probably "provided" by warlord-type folks in Haiti.


User currently offlineDerico From Argentina, joined Dec 1999, 4302 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4419 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 13):
That's the problem, nobody wants Haiti. It's just poor. No resources, no money, no industry.

Cheap labor. That should count for something. Why do clothing manufacturers make stuff in Bangladesh, Vietnam or Turkmenistan that end up in Western Hemisphere, yet not in Haiti?

Much lower shipping costs.



My internet was not shut down, the internet has shut me down
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 15, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4419 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 13):
The DR wants nothing to do with Haiti. The Haiti/DR border makes US/Mexico look like the border between Iowa and Nebraska. Haitians try over and over to get into the DR, only to get blocked or deported.

You totally missed the point. If Al Queda were to establish a stronghold in Haiti, the US would destroy the place. The Dominicans would essentially have a clean slate with which to take over all of Hispaniola.

Quoting AGM100 (Reply 10):

Foreign aid does nothing except exacerbate the problem over time it seems

Oh really? Like how Mexico paid back the US early, with interest, and ended up with a much more stable economy? How about Thailand's IMF bailout?



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19420 posts, RR: 58
Reply 16, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 4376 times:



Quoting N1120A (Reply 15):

You totally missed the point. If Al Queda were to establish a stronghold in Haiti, the US would destroy the place.

The U.S. is generally not in the business of mass destruction. Otherwise, we would have carpet-bombed Afghanistan and been done with it.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 15):

Oh really? Like how Mexico paid back the US early, with interest, and ended up with a much more stable economy? How about Thailand's IMF bailout?

Or how the Marshall Plan led eventually to a Europe that is economically stronger than the U.S.?


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 17, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 4375 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 16):

The U.S. is generally not in the business of mass destruction. Otherwise, we would have carpet-bombed Afghanistan and been done with it.

If you had an Al Queda stronghold so close by, things would be different. Besides, Haiti is a much smaller and easier to invade country and much closer for logistical purposes.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineAviationMaster From Switzerland, joined Oct 1999, 2479 posts, RR: 34
Reply 18, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 4365 times:

IF the help that Haiti is receiving at the moment is used in a constructive manner in order to get the country going again, then this catastrophe might have been the best thing that has happened to them in a long time. Its basically their chance to start from scratch and build up new infrastructure that will support the country in the future. But I'm almost sure that most of the aid money will once again "mysteriously" disappear in the wallets of some corrupt politicians.

So what's the future? They're going to stay just as poor as they were before. As harsh as it may sound, in two to three weeks time, you'll barely hear a news report on Haiti on one of the big news channels.

Quoting AGM100 (Reply 10):
Foreign aid does nothing except exacerbate the problem over time it seems. Your left with a population that does not work upward to sustain itself . I am not talking about a stock exchange ... I am talking about the basics ... like food production , basic infrastructure , basic social fabric and security. Remove the foreign aid and what is left in Haiti for the people ?

 checkmark 

In the end, foreign aid just allows corruption to thrive to even higher heights.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 11):
I think it would rather deteriorate it.

I don't think the situation in Haiti can deteriorate even further.


User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 19, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4344 times:

OK, so maybe my initial hypothesis on what could happen is completely unrealistic. Nevertheless, I do think that France may get deeper involved than most other countries providing humanitarian relief (though I've read somewhere that US soldiers may be sent to Haiti to provide for security for the time being).

User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4342 times:



Quoting AviationMaster (Reply 18):
But I'm almost sure that most of the aid money will once again "mysteriously" disappear in the wallets of some corrupt politicians.

Hence why they were in the predictament before the earthquake. Total government corruption. Until that hurdle is clear nothing can improve.


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8191 posts, RR: 8
Reply 21, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4332 times:

Short term I believe that there will be very good response and support for the country and its people. I hope to see a lot of countries participating so the influences there are not just American.

Longer term will, I believe, depend in part on some of the actions taken in the next month or so. There is the horrible situation of having tens of thousands of bodies to take care of. There is the demanding situation of continued rescue that need heavy equipment. But then there will be a shift from rescue to removal - of remains and of rubble,

When we start clearing out the rubble we need to have some idea of what should be built in it's place.

Housing design is a good start. I think that if I was a prof of architecture I would be assigning my students a project of designing basic, safe housing for Haiti. Small single family homes, Multi family homes and apartments. I'd add in the old apartment over a shop idea. And small clinics, staffed by nurses& physician assistants. And schools, some neighborhood based and some area based. There is simply so much that has to be done that there is a need for a lot of brains on the project.

Another important start will be training. After Katrina I wrote to one of my Senators about the potential of trade training of displaced N.O. citizens. Train them as carpenters, electricians, plumbers, etc. so they can earn money rebuilding the city - better than staying on the dole. (Both of my Senators are conservative Republicans so obviously I didn't even get a reply.  Yeah sure) The reality is that the Katrina related training would now be over and there would be tradesmen and women now. Able to rebuild. But most are probable on still getting food stamps, Medicaid, etc..

Move that training thought to Haiti - there is massive rebuilding to be done. And at a quality level that can avoid the destruction that was felt this week.

And the need for teachers & trainers will go through the roof. Unless education is significantly increased there will be no true long term employment. One can look to Aruba for excellent multi-lingual education at the elementary school level and up. Everything doesn't have to be "US style".

At the core we need to look towards the long term, starting now.


User currently offlineBO__einG From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2771 posts, RR: 18
Reply 22, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 4277 times:

The outpouring for this is immense and very touching.
I agree with many here that the country has already been poor and impoverished from the beginning and this earthquake only worsened it exponentially. I too would support the idea of this country surrendering its sovereignty and be absorbed back into the French territory or be absorbed to be a part of the United states like how some places like Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, etc. Or any other able country willing to accomodate a 10 million strong population boost. Canada? (already having tens of thousands residing)

If left alone, this country will go into anarchy. I see similar comparisons of Haiti to that of Somalia with the exception of pirates and warlord lawlessness.
Even foreign occupation would be a better alternative as there will be the kinds of assistance available beyond the ability of its own. The reality is, this poor land has very limited to no chance of flourishing unless something changes dramatically.

Something like a COM or some form of merger with another country like the ones I mentioned above or Dom. Republic is the ticket out. Reality is, who's willing to do that in today's world..



Chance favors the prepared mind.
User currently offlineMAH4546 From Sweden, joined Jan 2001, 32628 posts, RR: 72
Reply 23, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 4268 times:

I fully expect that as a result of this very unfortunate event is that we will see an increasing amount of migration out of the country. Many Haitians have relatives in the United States, Quebec, the Bahamas, the French Caribbean islands and the Dominican Republic, and I think many will attempt to pick up, leave and start anew with the help of their families elsewhere.

In South Florida, the Catholic church is already starting to arrange charter flights to bring orphaned children from the earthquake to Miami, and then connect them with relatives in the United States to start life anew.

We saw this kind of situation with New Orleans, but Port Au Prince is in a lot worse shape and will be a lot more difficult to repair than New Orleans.



a.
User currently onlineF9Animal From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 5001 posts, RR: 28
Reply 24, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 4242 times:

I would like to see Haiti recover from this stronger. I would like to see the government change dramatically, and stop the corruption. Corruption alone is a huge factor in why we see Haiti in such a terribly poor state.

I would like to see new building codes. I would like to see a future for the people of Haiti. They deserve it for all they have been through.

Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
When the smoke has cleared and the relief workers have gone away, Haiti will lie a tropical paradise wasteland. I don't see how the Hatian government can continue to function. What will happen in Haiti? Will it descend into complete anarchy? Will warlords arise until one becomes a dictator? More worrisome, in times of desperation, will a group like Al Qaeda, with money and promises of eternal paradise, find a warm home there?

Discuss...

Al Qaeda would never succeed in Haiti. Hopefully the US and other nations can use this tragedy as a building block to help them get on their feet. It would even be great if a large company would setup shop there. Anything to change the way things were!



I Am A Different Animal!!
25 IwenttoYXEonce : What prevented Haiti from developing in the first place? Just take a look at its neighbour on the same island. Totally different countries. One is poo
26 MadameConcorde : Strong probability yes. Hopefully there will be others who are less corrupt and a fair share of the $Millions will go to reconstruction and aid. Now
27 JJJ : I know a Haitian doctor that has been living here for the last 30ish years. He fled (like a huge number of other skilled workers) from the Duvalier r
28 AGM100 : Really ? Mexico has paid back the 4 billion from the Clinton currency stabilization ? That is encouraging news .... and the charts also show that imp
29 Mirrodie : Marie, you ask why would France take care of this and why would France take them back. Yet, you clearly STATE that they did EXACTLY the same with Duv
30 MadameConcorde : Oh definitely. I posted about this somewhere earlier. Baby Doc lives a lavish life between Paris and the French Riviera where he has a mansion, compl
31 AM744 : Yep. It's been some years now.
32 Mirrodie : It's criminal. its unbelievable and undeserved. Yet, Haiti saw better days under him. At least there was SOME rule rather than multifactorial rule.
33 NIKV69 : Why does O'Reillly have to enter into this? Why do you want to challenge a person on TV who merely stated a fact? As for how do you establish a gover
34 OA412 : I have to say that this is the one bit of good news that has emerged from this whole tragic mess. I just hope that this event will put into motion ev
35 Mirrodie : I brought that in as it relates to this discussion and points he made last evening. He's just an example. I'm sure Olbermann or Maddox or anyone else
36 N1120A : Um, they paid it back when Clinton was still in office. It is actually an excellent case study in how direct lending between countries is often a bet
37 NIKV69 : He simply said Haiti needs a better government. Pretty much fact as far as can see. What can they do? They are TV personalities. This is on the peopl
38 Post contains links Texan : I would recommend reading David Brook's opinion piece from the 14 Jan 2010 New York Times. Interesting topic about how funds are best spent. Texan
39 Post contains links TheCol : http://www.torontosun.com/news/haiti/2010/01/17/12503421-qmi.html Canada will be holding a international conference later this month to discuss the re
40 N1120A : Your buddy George apparently didn't think so when he got Aristide tossed.
41 Mirrodie : Not once did I say that he lied so I am not sure why you are pushing that issue. Perhaps I wasn't clear. Again, I am challenging his answer. He, as w
42 Post contains links Baroque : Thanks as always for that heads up. Basic message, building standards rather than the earthquake, then blend in cultural and historical issues - whic
43 Superfly : Probably a benefit concert with Bono/U2, Bruce Spingsteen and the other usual benefit artist.
44 Post contains links Oly720man : Will they be able to raise half a $billion.... small change given what the banks have been handed recently. Haiti's largest creditor, the Inter-Ameri
45 Us330 : Their first priority should be getting a competent, non-corrupt government in place. Look at the frequent success stories of the kids of Haitian expat
46 AGM100 : This is were I unplug .... Can a nation and a people be "given" the opportunity to succeed ? In order to believe this in the case in Haiti, you must
47 MarSciGuy : IIRC it was repaid within a couple years? Everyone was shocked at the speed of repayment at the time, at least that's what I (a teen at the time) gle
48 Dreadnought : I hate to be all doom and gloom, but it's going to get worse. You still have tens of thousands of corpses, maybe 100,000, in 90-100 degree temperatur
49 DocLightning : Already is. Survivors who were perfectly healthy are starting to get infections.
50 AGM100 : And for that they received ... NAFTA....? .. If so it was certainly a good play on the part of the Mexicans . NAFTA has increased exports from Mexico
51 Superfly : Wow, I spoke too soon! It's actually going to happen. I guess any amount helps.
52 NA : Most important will be a "good" government and a working infrastructure. Something the country never had the chance to get, being largely ignored and
53 Santosdumont : Hard as this may be to imagine, France has never forgiven Haiti for marshaling an army of slaves and kicking Napoleon's ass. Similarly, the brutality
54 Post contains links Oly720man : And those with relatively easily treatable broken bones or infections are having limbs amputated before gangrene kills them. http://www.timesonline.c
55 Slider : I’ll admit to possessing ignorance by and large about Haiti. I had to do some reading and Googling, learning more about the country and its history.
56 Csavel : Both were poor as hell, and until the 60s, the DR had Trujillo a megamaniacal maniac who re-named Santo Domingo to Ciudad Trujillo. The DR was a joke
57 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : According to a report in the French newspaper Le Post, scientists Daniel and Ginette Mathurin say that Haiti's oil reserves are larger than those of
58 Mirrodie : This is the first I am hearing of oil reserves in Haiti. How reputable are these sources? Michel and Mathurin and Daniel? That is surely interesting r
59 STT757 : One thing going forward I think has to be addressed with the Haitian infrastructure is the airport, it's very small with very little ramp space hence
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