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Passport And Visa To Enter A Nightclub?  
User currently onlineAKLDELNonstop From New Zealand, joined Apr 2006, 311 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9770 times:

Ok so I am in Kansas City, Missourie on some business. One of my friends here invited me to this nightclub called Mosaic on Friday night.

I was with three other friends (none of them American). When we tried to get in they wouldn't accept overseas driving license as ID proof (never mind that the car rentals don't have any problems with overseas licenses). Anyway the guy asked to see our passports, which for some reason I was carrying. Not just that, he then asked me to show him the visa!!! I mean really??? Passport and visa to enter a night club???

As my other friends weren't carrying their passports, we were not allowed in.

So we went to another bar, where we got in..no problems and had a really great night. Some awesome people in Kansas City. But I still wonder, what kind of guy would ask for passport and visa to enter a nightclub. I am sure this isn't the norm in the US, but it's guys like these who create a negative image for outsiders (aliens as you guys like to call us :P).

But yeah overall we had a great night.

57 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAirTran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3704 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9768 times:
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I don't know why he'd ask for a visa (maybe he works on the side for I.N.S.), but I have had to use my passport to enter clubs and buy train tickets when abroad because they wouldn't take my drivers license.


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User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 2, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9740 times:

Quoting AirTran737 (Reply 1):
I don't know why he'd ask for a visa (maybe he works on the side for I.N.S.), but I have had to use my passport to enter clubs and buy train tickets when abroad because they wouldn't take my drivers license.

Other countries do not accept driver's licences as ID documents because unlike the US, where you can use e.g. your driver's licence or social security card as legal ID, most countries simply don't recognise a driver's licence as legal identification document. Most countries require either passport or national ID card for identification purposes (e.g. within Schengen, if you're a German travelling to Austria, or a Pole travelling to Spain, your ID card would suffice). That being said, why would a local place in the US request someone's passport and even visa to enter the place?

I remember one time in the US (this was told here once), where someone was asked for an ID (he wanted a drink), showed his passport, but the person who asked for the ID did not accept that, so he had to pull his driver's licence and could finally have a drink.


User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5669 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9721 times:

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
When we tried to get in they wouldn't accept overseas driving license as ID proof (never mind that the car rentals don't have any problems with overseas licenses).

Car rental agencies are very used to seeing foreign DL's. Many nightclubs aren't used to seeing out-of-state ones (and a friend of mine got refused entry because he didn't have an Arizona ID).

This is the result of rather poorly worded newer laws that punish individual servers with huge fines for serving alcohol to people under 21, even if they believed the ID was genuine.

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
he then asked me to show him the visa!!!

Just a retard on a power trip.

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
I am sure this isn't the norm in the US, but it's guys like these who create a negative image for outsiders (aliens as you guys like to call us :P).

I've always had to use my passport when in Europe...



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently onlineAKLDELNonstop From New Zealand, joined Apr 2006, 311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9690 times:

Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 3):
I've always had to use my passport when in Europe...

It's not so much the passport that irked. Okay I can understand that. But to ask me for my visa. Now that was annoying.


User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 5, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9689 times:

Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 3):
I've always had to use my passport when in Europe...

Like I implied in my post, in Europe a passport is legally considered an identification document, while a driver's licence is not. As a non-Schengen citizen, it would be obvious for you to be asked for your passport. If you were a national of a Schengen country within a Schengen country, then the national ID card is the ID of choice (e.g. Spain's DNI, Germany's Personalausweis, France's carte nationale d'identité, etc.).

I don't want to start a discussion on that, but maybe the states could perhaps simplify their ID mess by either clarifying those laws for IDing underage drinkers, clarify ID requirements during a stay in the US for foreign visitors, or the country could consider introducing a national ID card? Besides, what if someone never made a driver's licence and thus, despite being 21 or older, doesn't have one to ID himself? Is he or she then SOL when asked for a driver's licence, or would they still accept e.g. at least the national ID during the stay in the US?

[Edited 2010-04-11 11:34:14]

User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3497 posts, RR: 17
Reply 6, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9688 times:
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If you are a diplomat in the USA you are issued a special driver license from the dept. of state. I lost how many times i did have to explain why i am carrying this special D L. At car hire desks, airline check in, and even the TSA. The most common question is what state issued this 
I do not drink for health and other reasons and i look way over 21 even way over 41 so no problem going into clubs. ?  

Also some countries are visa exempt, so what happens then? Will he call the ISN or he will not allow you in and put you on the first plane back? Is this what they call a power trip?

[Edited 2010-04-11 12:02:02]


I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently onlineAKLDELNonstop From New Zealand, joined Apr 2006, 311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9629 times:

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 5):
Besides, what if someone never made a driver's licence and thus, despite being 21 or older, doesn't have one to ID himself? Is he or she then SOL when asked for a driver's licence, or would they still accept e.g. at least the national ID during the stay in the US?

I believe in Missourie you can get a Non-Driver's license that can be used as an age proof document.


User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 8, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9624 times:

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
Anyway the guy asked to see our passports, which for some reason I was carrying.

You should always, always, ALWAYS carry your passports when abroad. You never know when you'll really need them. What if you had gotten into a legal issue while abroad with the police??

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
As my other friends weren't carrying their passports...

Not very smart. A big mistake to go without your passport while traveling abroad.

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 2):
the US, where you can use e.g. your driver's licence or social security card as legal ID

Not anymore. The Social Security card is not an acceptable form of ID anymore. It does not have a picture of the bearer on it.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineajd1992 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 9624 times:

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 5):

Like I implied in my post, in Europe a passport is legally considered an identification document, while a driver's licence is not. As a non-Schengen citizen, it would be obvious for you to be asked for your passport. If you were a national of a Schengen country within a Schengen country, then the national ID card is the ID of choice (e.g. Spain's DNI, Germany's Personalausweis, France's carte nationale d'identité, etc.).

In the UK a driving licence is considered a legal ID document. I've used mine for ID in the bank, pubs (long story, I'm not 18 but they still wanted ID). We don't have a compulsory national ID card though so it's just as well they're accepted, passports are too big and too valuable to be carrying around.

Either way - he was just a guy gone mad with power. If immigration think you're there for a holiday and not to work or whatever, he has no right in asking you why you're there.


User currently offlinecsavel From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1368 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 9602 times:

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 8):
Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
Anyway the guy asked to see our passports, which for some reason I was carrying.

You should always, always, ALWAYS carry your passports when abroad. You never know when you'll really need them. What if you had gotten into a legal issue while abroad with the police??

Actually unless the country specifically requires it OR you have no safe place to store it, you should NEVER carry your passport. You should make a photocopy of the passport and carry that, otherwise you are SOL if you lose it and it is a pain in the butt to get a replacement on short notice. if the cop *really* needs to see your passport and won't accept the copy, well then you have a problem, but I think that is much less likely than you losing your passport or having it stolen.

Again this does not apply if you have no safe place to stow it, then carry it.

When I travel on business (and thus am not staying at a sh*thole), my passport is in the hotel safe for the duration.



I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
User currently offlinetrident3 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 1013 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 9589 times:

I had the same thing happen to me in Boston last year. A friend and I went to see ZZ Top at the Orpheum and they would not accept his ID to buy beer ( he is a Mass resident but I don't know what the ID he had was) I produced my UK passport flipped open to the photo page as I would do when entering a bar and the little hitler behind the counter demanded to see a valid entrance stamp as well. She then had the temerity to charge 10 dollars each for a beer !


"We are the warrior race-Tough men in the toughest sport." Brian Noble, Head Coach, Great Britain Rugby League.
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 12, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 9560 times:

Quoting csavel (Reply 10):
you should NEVER carry your passport.

I disagree.

Quoting csavel (Reply 10):
if the cop *really* needs to see your passport and won't accept the copy, well then you have a problem..

More reason why one should always, always carry their passport. It is the smart thing to do. You only lose your passport when you are not acting responsible for it.

Quoting csavel (Reply 10):
my passport is in the hotel safe for the duration.

Not very smart.   



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19919 posts, RR: 59
Reply 13, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 9475 times:

Quoting AirTran737 (Reply 1):
I don't know why he'd ask for a visa (maybe he works on the side for I.N.S.), but I have had to use my passport to enter clubs and buy train tickets when abroad because they wouldn't take my drivers license.

I rarely have to prove my age anymore   but I remember once going out in NYC with my passport. I think I'd just surrendered my MI license (they take the old license from you in NY) and was waiting for my NY license to come in the mail.


User currently offlineManuCH From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 3011 posts, RR: 47
Reply 14, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 9461 times:
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Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 8):
You should always, always, ALWAYS carry your passports when abroad. You never know when you'll really need them. What if you had gotten into a legal issue while abroad with the police??

I NEVER carry my passport around. It is only used while traveling, for the duration of the trip itself. When not on the road to/from the airport, I have my national ID card with me. Should I run into police who wants to see my passport, I have a photocopy with me. If that's not enough, I'll be glad to go to the hotel and pick it up (with police escort, I suppose).

I don't have that much of a travel experience (it's usually 1-2 leisure international trips per year maximum for me), but my father has been flying all over the world for 30 years, at least 1 trip per month, and he uses my same philosophy (more precisely, I copied mine from him). Never had a problem with police, and the passport is well safe at the hotel.

OTOH, the only person I know who carries the passport around actually lost it while in the UK. She missed the flight and had to re-book and pay for it twice.



Never trust a statistic you didn't fake yourself
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19919 posts, RR: 59
Reply 15, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 9453 times:

Oh, and I'm not sure if this still happens, but in some places in CA, they won't accept out-of-state licenses. I was once visiting my mom in Santa Barbara while I was in med school. I went to the local supermarket and the lady asked for my ID (I was getting some wine with the rest of my groceries to make dinner) and when I showed her my MI ID (I was 27 at the time), she told me that they only accept CA licenses.

Now, the law says that you need to be 21 to drink. The store isn't legally bound to follow the law to the letter as long as nobody under 21 can purchase alcohol there. They can have a policy of only selling to people over the age of 45 if they want. It's their right. I also have some rights.  

I was polite; I always am. It's not her policy, so there's no point bawling her out over it. But I have the right to pick a different store if I don't like the policy. And so I asked her to cancel the transaction, apologized to her that they'd have to re-shelve my entire order, and walked out.


User currently offlinecsavel From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1368 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 9375 times:

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 12):
Quoting csavel (Reply 10):
if the cop *really* needs to see your passport and won't accept the copy, well then you have a problem..

More reason why one should always, always carry their passport. It is the smart thing to do. You only lose your passport when you are not acting responsible for it.

Well you could also be robbed or held up. Responsibility rarely enters into the equation. Plus, you know, nobody is 100% responsible 100% of the time. If you are travelling in a place where you might not know the language or customs, why not make it so you have one less thing to worry about.

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 12):
Quoting csavel (Reply 10):
my passport is in the hotel safe for the duration.

Not very smart.

Again, i stand by my assertion that unless the laws of the country require you to do so, or there is no secure place to store it at a hotel, you are far better off NOT carrying your passport around. I've been doing it that way for 20 years now.
And note ManuCH reports that his father, who has a lot of travel experience does the same thing.



I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
User currently offlineVirgin744 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 919 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 9371 times:

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 8):

Totally disagree with you on this and have to admit you're absolutely wrong in your way of thinking, that last thing you'd want to be doing on holiday is carrying your passport around with you everywhere. The safest place for you to store your belongings and most especially your passport is in your hotel room, preferebly in the safe.

You will statistically AND realistically have more chance of your personal belongings (including passport) to be stolen or lost when you have it on you rather than be left in your hotel room! That's a fact!! You are very misinformed or ill advised if you think anything to the contraty of this.

Carrying any other form of ID such as a out of state or foreign drivers license is and should be perfectly acceptable in most places. I have shown my UK drivers license in many US states and foreign countries including Philippines, Turkey, Cyprus etc and no-one has ever said this wasnt adequate enough.

Whilst LTU932 is correct in that a drivers license may not be a national form of ID it is a fact that they ARE issued by govermental departments and organisations for example the DVLA is a UK government organisation and its database is used by police, similarly, the DMV (US department of motor vehicles) is also a government agency and their database is also access by police


User currently offlinesw733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6341 posts, RR: 9
Reply 18, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 9371 times:

Let me add my opinion as a foreign born Kansas City-area resident...now, I am a dual citizen, raised by American parents so I speak with an American accent, and I have a Kansas drivers license, but...

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
Mosaic

Here might be your first problem. KC Power & Light District is the "go to" place for underage people who think it's cool to be overcharged and act like douchebags (oh, wait, my fiance is 28 and still loves it there...oh well, at least I hate it at Power & Light), so the bars there are usually pretty tight with ID requirements.

That being said, the passport is a somewhat understandable request, but certainly NOT the visa request. The doorman is not an immigration officer. I would have told him to shove it and left...just go down the street to The Flying Saucer, much better place anyways  
Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 3):
Just a retard on a power trip.

Especially at Mosaic. That place is full of idiots, and there must have been since 17 year old girl in back of him in line that he was trying to impress/molest.


User currently offlineFlyer732 From Namibia, joined Nov 1999, 1367 posts, RR: 21
Reply 19, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 9340 times:

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 12):
More reason why one should always, always carry their passport. It is the smart thing to do. You only lose your passport when you are not acting responsible for it.

Quoting csavel (Reply 10):
my passport is in the hotel safe for the duration.

Not very smart.

I travel some pretty bad places, and I usually don't carry my passport out with me. Its locked up somewhere safe. I work for an international airline, and most of the employees I work with don't carry theirs on their person when out.

The only place I've ever carried my passport on me is in Russia and former Soviet states where ID checks are the norm, and even then I've never been asked to see it.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6722 posts, RR: 12
Reply 20, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 9315 times:

Quoting Virgin744 (Reply 17):
similarly, the DMV (US department of motor vehicles) is also a government agency and their database is also access by police

BTW, can anybody explain why the DMV is a government agency, but there are no US driver's licence ?

That seems all the more strange that there is no mandatory US ID card either.

I find a national ID card pretty useful, and quite less bothersome than a passport, it fits nicely in the wallet. I started using it at 12 to see movies restricted to less than that age (obviously you won't have a driver's licence at 12).

It's looking as there will be an European driving licence before an US one.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3497 posts, RR: 17
Reply 21, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 9274 times:
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Quoting Aesma (Reply 20):
BTW, can anybody explain why the DMV is a government agency, but there are no US driver's licence ?

i could be wrong here, but it seems there is different driving laws in each state, thats why the driving license is issued in each state and not a US one. Again i can be wrong here. Also to make sure that the fees paid goes to the state where the driver reside.



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlinedc9northwest From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 2297 posts, RR: 7
Reply 22, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 9264 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 20):
BTW, can anybody explain why the DMV is a government agency, but there are no US driver's licence ?

Just to inconvenience those who move between different states, make them get a new licence (at the latest) 6 months after setting up residence in another state.

It's a bit funny that the US requires driving, whereas in Europe you don't need to drive, yet the general speed limits are much lower in the US, at least on highways.

But I do believe it is rather strange that the US doesn't have a national ID card... I see no real motive to not have one... I guess that there's something in the Constitution that's against it, at least that's what some people claim, but I don't really know.

I do think a national ID card would be useful. It could also serve as Driver's License, provided you pass the test... So, yeah, to someone who knows the law... Why not?


User currently offlineLufthansa411 From Germany, joined Jan 2008, 692 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 9209 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 20):
BTW, can anybody explain why the DMV is a government agency, but there are no US driver's licence ?

Funny enough...When I was applying for my first learner's permit in NY before moving to Germany, a video was playing on the TV on the waiting line. It was very NY-centric and I'll shorten it up an paraphrase a bit...

As more people started getting automobiles, more accidents began to happen, especially in places such as NYC. In addition, the well-off citizens of NY wanted to make sure that chauffeurs knew how to operate the car, as the "normal" practice among the rich was to hire someone off the street in addition to your other servants just to drive your car for you. Of course, this led to many unskilled drivers putting NY's elite in danger as many had no idea how to operate a car. At the insistence of of wealthy, NYS began issuing a document proving that chauffeurs actually knew how to operate the specific model of car they were driving. Back before the location of major controls were standardised, each model of car had a unique setup for braking, steering, accelerating etc.. Some cars had just a handbrake while others had 2 footbrakes, both needing to be pressed simultaneously, or other strange setups. Some states, especially those on the frontiers, did not have the amount of urbanisation that areas like NY did. So the federal gov. decided it was best left up to the states to issue their own guidelines. Today although automobiles are much more standardised, there are varying licensing standards among states: different licensing ages, different residency requirements, different vehicle classification standards, and different exams and lectures, making issuing a single US driving license impractical.



Nothing in life is to be feared; it is only to be understood.
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 24, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 9192 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 20):
BTW, can anybody explain why the DMV is a government agency, but there are no US driver's licence ?

DMV (Department of Motor Vehicals) is a State agency not a federal government agency. Each of the 50 States in the United States has there own system of licensing motor vehicles and their drivers.


25 Ltbewr : I have seen passports requested at Nightclubs and various businesses to verify age or idenity if a person is apparently a foreign national and does no
26 Pyrex : There are two requirements to being a bouncer in a bar/nightclub: be an asshole and be able to stand by a door. Boston bars and nightclubs are notorio
27 AirframeAS : Let's just agree to disagree and call it a day.
28 Maverick623 : A photocopy will suffice for most purposes. If they really wanna see your passport they'll escort you back to your room to get it. The only time I wa
29 grozzy : Ive been to places in London which require photo ID as deposit for the audo guide. No way am I giving up my passport, so my Australian liscense has be
30 bookishaviator : I regularly get asked to show my passport when going out in NYC (has happened on each trip there to date), but I rarely have it on my person so have o
31 PanHAM : ManuCH's father is right. First thing I do when getting into my hotel room is putting the passport and the credit cards I don't need into the room sa
32 gabrielchew : Why on Earth are out-of-State driving licenses not accepted out-of -State? Does each State issue completely differnt licences? When I was in DC in Dec
33 falstaff : In Michigan it is handled by the Secretary of State's office.
34 DiamondFlyer : No kidding. I took some community college classes last summer in Kansas City, and I swear every person there frequented P&L. Couple that with the
35 Post contains images sw733 : Indeed. It's to the point where I won't even go. It's stupid, it's a rip off, and it's the only place in KC where you have to pay for parking. In a c
36 Post contains images AirframeAS : This was a major part of the illegal immigration debate a few years back and this idea got slaughtered pretty quick by the American people!
37 Maverick623 : State governments are required to give full faith and credit to other state's driver's licenses. However, private establishments may refuse any form
38 dc9northwest : I realize that... What I don't realize is why that is.
39 Post contains links aa757first : Mainly privacy concerns. http://www.aclu.org/technology-and-l...berty/5-problems-national-id-cards http://www.aclu.org/technology-and-l...urging-him-
40 dc9northwest : Thanks aa757first, a nice read... But I don't see how such a device would be used to track movements, for example. No one scans your driver's license
41 DiamondFlyer : What are the benefits of spending a metric ton of money, in order to get a ID card which people already have? I can't think of one benefit that havin
42 dc9northwest : I don't see why states should issue their own IDs, that's all. Yes, they have their own laws as well federal laws, but if you're American, why have a
43 sw733 : Not necessarily. If you moved, you have a new address. If you have a new address, you should need a new ID. Therefore, you would still need to get a
44 dc9northwest : Hmmm. I guess you're right here. Never mind... Bad example on my part.
45 Aesma : Maybe you didn't read the thread ? Several people stated that their state ID was a problem out of state. And it wouldn't really cost a ton of money,
46 Maverick623 : Completely different things. I can choose whether or not I want to drive a car. I can't exactly choose whether or not I want to be an American citize
47 JRadier : The big question with that is why? Here in the netherlands your adress isn't on your ID-card, passport or driverslicense. I moved twice and both time
48 sw733 : Well that's kind of what happens here, at least in Kansas where I live. If I move, the first thing I do is go online and let them know. Then, if I wa
49 DiamondFlyer : How would it not cost a ton of money? You can't replace state ID, without making a federal driver's license. I can't imagine the incredible amounts o
50 MoltenRock : LOL! I'd bet $20 that this dude wanted to see a credit card with your name on it, like a "VISA" card, as a 2nd form of ID to make sure you were reall
51 sw733 : This is a really good point. That is quite common here in the USA...more of a proof that the first ID is real, because you can get credit cards befor
52 Post contains images Aesma : In France the address is on the ID card, the passport, and the driver's license...but it is not mandatory to update them. And the driver's license is
53 ajd1992 : Actually, it might be illegal to not notify them of a change of address. It's punishable by a £1000 fine or 6 months in prison in the UK if you don'
54 aa757first : Driving license laws are different in each state. For example, in California you can get your permit when you're (I think) 15.5 years old and then ta
55 N1120A : I would immediately express my displeasure with his behavior and leave. The DMV isn't a US government agency. Indeed, the DMV is a generic term for w
56 57AZ : Indeed. The SSN card also lacks a signature and has no safeguard features to prevent tampering. Essentially every state uses tamper resistant technol
57 exFATboy : Actually, the Social Security card was never an acceptable form of ID - up until the 80s, they actually said "not for identification" right on the fr
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