Sponsor Message:
Non Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
How Much Do You Bench?  
User currently offlineElite From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2006, 2796 posts, RR: 10
Posted (4 years 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6754 times:

How much do you bench? If you want, post your weight, but that is optional.

Also, is benching really the benchmark (no pun intended) of strength like they do in the NFL combines? I always thought it was just using chest muscles and does not take into account bicep and tricep strength that much.

19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSwissy From Switzerland, joined Jan 2005, 1734 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 6725 times:

During the time I joined a gym with my dad (4 years total) I was able to get up to 120kg by myself and my weight was around 88kgs... , however since I moved to Canada have not done any bench pressing... just beer and BBQ 

Cheerios,


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19495 posts, RR: 58
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6715 times:



User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6712 times:

Quoting Elite (Thread starter):
I always thought it was just using chest muscles and does not take into account bicep and tricep strength that much.

It's mostly chest, but there's some tricep in there as well - any motion in which you're extending your forearm against resistance exercises your tricep. No bicep, though, as that's used when you retract your forearm against resistance.



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineAA757MIA From United States of America, joined May 2008, 253 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6710 times:

It's all about doing it right, not what you can bench. I've been working out for about 10 years now (on and off, and even though I've been going to the gym lately, there are weeks I don't go on a single day) and I can only bench like 100 lbs. I weight ~160.
I see guys lifting twice as much but they're just trying to get injured, their muscles are not strong enough for that kind of weight. They bounce the bar on their chest, don't come down enough, all kind of stupid moves.


User currently offlineBlueShamu330s From UK - England, joined Sep 2001, 2894 posts, RR: 25
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 week 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 6698 times:

Quoting AA757MIA (Reply 4):
It's all about doing it right, not what you can bench.

  



Quoting AA757MIA (Reply 4):
I see guys lifting twice as much but they're just trying to get injured, their muscles are not strong enough for that kind of weight. They bounce the bar on their chest, don't come down enough, all kind of stupid moves.

  

They normally grunt like chimps and fart protein mix too LOL EVIL !   

Don't ever, EVER bounce the bar.   

It's all about method, not weight. I'm 107kg and press 100kg. The benchmark for achievement is to be able to press your own weight, but I don't buy that and alot of guys injure themselves with their obsession of achieving that goal. Instead of doing 3 sets of 10 reps at X weight, I'd rather do 3 or 4 different exercises, with less weight and more reps. I'm what you'd call a typical endomorph, so more reps and less weight gives me better definition instead of the typical puffed up look which I think can look a little gross.

Quoting Elite (Thread starter):
I always thought it was just using chest muscles and does not take into account bicep and tricep strength that much.

It is far more than just your pecs. Another fast track to A&E is to lift too much weight wrongly whilst relying on just your chest muscles. Posture is paramount. Feet firmly on the ground is your stabliser. Working out your core improves your stability too and enables you lift more weight once you have established and mastered the correct movement to do a satisfying chest press.

Finally, the chest is a relatively easy part of your body to build, so don't overdo it; too many guys think big pecs are the be all and end all, but without paying attention to the rest of their body, they end up looking like Pamela Anderson with stubble !  

Doc, down boy !  

Rgds



So I drive a 4x4. So what?! Tax the a$$ off me for it...oh, you already have... :-(
User currently offlineSurfandSnow From United States of America, joined Jan 2009, 2862 posts, RR: 30
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 6623 times:

Quoting Elite (Thread starter):
How much do you bench?

When I maxed out last month I was able to do 205 lbs. However I don't feel comfortable doing reps above 175 or 185 lbs.

I also enjoy bench pressing with dumbbells, as doing so is considerably more challenging (and develops your stabilizer muscles a lot more than the straight bar). I have never "maxed out" but usually do sets with 70s, 75s, or 80s.

Quoting Elite (Thread starter):
post your weight

Currently weigh about 180 lbs but trying to pack on another 10-15 lbs of muscle by 2011! Hopefully my bench press max will increase accordingly...

Quoting Elite (Thread starter):
is benching really the benchmark (no pun intended) of strength like they do in the NFL combines?

My personal trainer was an NFL player and bench pressed 225 lbs 40 times (in a row) with ease! This link:

http://www.nfl.com/combine/workouts

explains the NFL combine in detail and says that players are expected to bench press 225 lbs as many times as they can. Being able to do many reps at 225 lbs is a way to show strength AND endurance.

Quoting Elite (Thread starter):
I always thought it was just using chest muscles and does not take into account bicep and tricep strength that much.

Bench press does not work biceps at all. While bench press primarily works out your chest (pec) muscles, triceps and shoulders (deltoids, traps) are worked as well given that they function as support/stabilizer muscles. This is why (if you are on an advanced work out regimen) it is a very good idea to work your chest and triceps on the same day, with back and biceps on alternate days.

Quoting AA757MIA (Reply 4):
It's all about doing it right, not what you can bench.

Absolutely. The idea that you should be able to bench press your body weight is a rough estimate, but here is a more specific guide from a fitness professional:

"According to Robert Kennedy, author of the book Mass: New Scientific Body Secrets, the average 175 pound man can bench about 135 pounds—however, Kennedy affirms, this is an average which includes men from every fitness level, including those who don’t work out at all.

Certain factors must be considered when setting your goals. These include things like body weight and current fitness level. Obviously, a man who has never worked out before would set a lower goal than a seasoned bodybuilder.

The chart below indicates what Kennedy says are appropriate bench press goals. The first column indicates the weight range for the goals, listed in the right two columns. The one rep max listed in the second column indicates the goal range for bodybuilders, while the second column indicates the goal range for men who would just like to stay in shape and strong (or, for beginners.)

Body Weight/Bodybuilder/Beginner

105-120 / 260 / 156

121-135 / 285 / 171

136-155 / 310 / 186

156-170 / 335 / 201

171-185 / 360 / 216

186-205 / 385 / 231

206-225 / 410 / 246

226-245 / 430 / 258

246+ / 440 / 264"

http://www.brighthub.com/health/fitness/articles/37095.aspx

Quoting AA757MIA (Reply 4):
I've been working out for about 10 years now (on and off, and even though I've been going to the gym lately, there are weeks I don't go on a single day) and I can only bench like 100 lbs. I weight ~160.

Consistently is critical to not only gaining strength but maintaining it as well. Muscular atrophy (the breakdown of muscle tissue/loss of strength) begins to occur within 48-72 hours of your work out. So, if you intend to get stronger or maintain your strength, you should plan to be working the muscles at least twice a week (without overtraining, which is equally bad). Those weeks on end where you are not going in at all are certainly not helping your bench press abilities!

Quoting AA757MIA (Reply 4):
I see guys lifting twice as much but they're just trying to get injured, their muscles are not strong enough for that kind of weight. They bounce the bar on their chest, don't come down enough, all kind of stupid moves.

Benching heavy amounts of weight is perfectly acceptable if you are firmly in control of the weight and bringing it to approximately 1/2 inch above your chest. Just remember to ALWAYS use a spotter if you are pushing yourself!

Quoting BlueShamu330s (Reply 5):
I'm what you'd call a typical endomorph, so more reps and less weight gives me better definition instead of the typical puffed up look which I think can look a little gross.

What is an endomorph? LOL..

More reps and less weight will always give you better definition as it a more cardiovascular work out. Even if you are trying to build muscle mass, you shouldn't be 3 identical sets at the same weight. Always use different levels of weight and reps for maximum effect!

Quoting BlueShamu330s (Reply 5):
Finally, the chest is a relatively easy part of your body to build, so don't overdo it; too many guys think big pecs are the be all and end all, but without paying attention to the rest of their body, they end up looking like Pamela Anderson with stubble !

Hahaha. If you work out your chest a lot (guilty!) make sure to balance it out with a lot of back work outs. Nobody is going to say, "oh, hot back man!" but if you focus only on chest and ignore back, you end up with shoulders hunched forward and all kinds of other problems. Then you have the guys who religiously work out their upper body but have twig legs - it used to be me, until I rolled my ankle really bad from a minor fall (the physical therapist later told me my legs were way too weak for my weight!). Now I make sure to work legs just as much as upper body so that I won't have any more devastating accidents!



Flying in the middle seat of coach is much better than not flying at all!
User currently offlinesw733 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 6311 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 6592 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 2):


User currently offlinekalakaua From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1516 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 6542 times:

Barbell:
Flat--250lbs, three sets of ten reps.
Incline--230lbs, ""
Decline--260lbs, ""

Dumbbell:
Flat--110lbs on each arm, ...
Incline--90
Decline--100



Gravity explains the motions of the planets, but it cannot explain who set the planets in motion.
User currently offlineMasterBean From UK - England, joined Apr 2010, 181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 6487 times:

About 10kgs but it used to be about 20.

User currently offlineAA757MIA From United States of America, joined May 2008, 253 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (4 years 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6453 times:

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 6):
Those weeks on end where you are not going in at all are certainly not helping your bench press abilities!

I know! That's why I mentioned it, because I know that's the reason why I cannot bench more than ~100 lbs. Thanks to my stupid work/travel schedule, otherwise I'd go at least 4 times a week.

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 6):
Benching heavy amounts of weight is perfectly acceptable if you are firmly in control of the weight and bringing it to approximately 1/2 inch above your chest.

Right, but those guys I was referring to are not firmly in control of the weight when they bounce the bar on their chest, cannot bring it down enough, etc...


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19495 posts, RR: 58
Reply 11, posted (4 years 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 6438 times:

Quoting sw733 (Reply 7):

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

I deserved that.


User currently offlinemirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Reply 12, posted (4 years 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6370 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting AA757MIA (Reply 4):
they're just trying to get injured, their muscles are not strong enough for that kind of weight. They bounce the bar on their chest, don't come down enough, all kind of stupid moves.

You ought to jump in and show them the right way. Form is key!

But if you do it right, there is no reason one can't bench their own bodyweight, if that is their goal and do it safely.

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 6):
I also enjoy bench pressing with dumbbells, as doing so is considerably more challenging (and develops your stabilizer muscles a lot more than the straight bar)

As do I. Also, I have to since I rarely have a spotter.

So I don't enjoy working chest as much as back.

As of yesterday I was 163 lbs.

Barbell:
Flat--290 lbs (*)
Incline--210lbs, ""
Decline--210lbs, ""

Dumbbell:
Flat--95lbs on each arm
Incline--90

Then I do 100 dips.



so this brings up a question.....

my schedule is such that I just can't work with a partner. So on a barbell, I never push past 180 to 190 lbs without a spotter. That also goes for when I use a Smith Machine to bench, although I only added that last week.

That said, I tend to use the following, which I can get up to 290 lbs. It helps as far as not needing a spotter. It is a bench "machine, but does it really technically "count" as benching?




Forum moderator 2001-2010; He's a pedantic, pontificating, pretentious bastard, a belligerent old fart, a worthless st
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7247 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (4 years 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 6321 times:

I've wondered about machine like the one posted above, I've seen people move some pretty huge weights on which they couldn't on a flat bench press. I max out at 70kg and am trying to bench my body weight, on one of these machines I can do 90, 20 less than I weigh. For me I think the issue is mental, I just don't have the confidence to bench heavier.

Now legs I've got, calf raises (donkey or seated) 150kg, leg press 400kg (on a good day 4-6 reps), I used to squat 120-130kg although I don't squat anymore since I've now blown out my knee twice, once skiing the other time when I slipped on some ice.

One of the strongest All Blacks (power to weight) and rugbys greatest fullback was Christian Cullen, for a small guy weighing 85kg he could bench 150kg.

[Edited 2010-08-16 11:03:16]

User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7247 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (4 years 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 6313 times:

This is a really good article.

http://www.criticalbench.com/pro-athletes-bench-press.htm

Interesting that Arnie never benched more than 450lbs. A few photos for Doc.



and a nice shot comparing Arnie to big Ronnie.



and another shot comparing Jay, Arnie and Frank Zane

http://reptilis.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/bodybuilder_bodytypes.jpg

I much prefer the older symetry over mass style of body building, guys back then looked like humans with muscle, whereas today they look like freaks.


User currently offlinemirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Reply 15, posted (4 years 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 6274 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 13):
For me I think the issue is mental, I just don't have the confidence to bench heavier.

Nah, I think you are being smart. I wont go heavier under a barbell for my own risk of safety. "benching" dumbbells and machines like the above do the trick.


And another thing, while I try to keep up with the right protein, I never have get enough carbs. But the one thing I enjoy about my bodybuilding goals is that I keep it all natural.



Forum moderator 2001-2010; He's a pedantic, pontificating, pretentious bastard, a belligerent old fart, a worthless st
User currently offlineElite From Hong Kong, joined Jun 2006, 2796 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (4 years 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 6271 times:

Quoting mirrodie (Reply 12):
That said, I tend to use the following, which I can get up to 290 lbs. It helps as far as not needing a spotter. It is a bench "machine, but does it really technically "count" as benching?

I think free-weight benching is a lot harder, and machines focus on the chest muscles a lot more. When you are using a free-weight bar, or even dumbbells, the balancing requires the use of a lot of small muscles that otherwise would not be used.


User currently offline4holer From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 3011 posts, RR: 9
Reply 17, posted (4 years 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 6223 times:

Can't believe no one's linked to this yet...
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7ttvq_how-much-ya-bench_fun



Ghosts appear and fade away.....................
User currently offlinemirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Reply 18, posted (4 years 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 6201 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting 4holer (Reply 17):
Can't believe no one's linked to this yet...

never seen it before. loved it. Farley Classic! Mimics a lot of the guys at my old gym.



Forum moderator 2001-2010; He's a pedantic, pontificating, pretentious bastard, a belligerent old fart, a worthless st
User currently offlineElBandGeek From United States of America, joined Jun 2008, 753 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (4 years 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6171 times:

I only recently started going to the gym (and have so far not been too good about regularly doing so) and I'm still figuring out exactly how much weight to use and such, but it seems I've at least been able to do about 90-100lbs for 5 reps in 4 or 5 sets. We'll see how I am in a few months if I start actually taking this seriously since I really need to get in shape.

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Car Insurance: How Much Do You Pay A Year? posted Fri Dec 28 2007 11:33:27 by F.pier
How Much Do You Read? posted Mon Oct 1 2007 16:49:07 by B747forever
How Much Do You Have To Pay For Licence Plates? posted Tue May 1 2007 22:17:42 by Airfoilsguy
How Much Do You Drive In A Day? posted Mon Apr 16 2007 19:48:53 by Greyhound
How Much Do You Care About National Unity? posted Tue Oct 17 2006 23:18:32 by AerospaceFan
How Much Can You Bench? posted Tue Sep 12 2006 19:41:22 by DeltaOwnsAll
Mormonism: How Much Do You Know About It? posted Wed Apr 12 2006 00:53:37 by Iamcanadian
How Much Do You Post? posted Mon Apr 10 2006 11:38:08 by Lordanmol
How Much Do You Drink When Beer Is Cheap? posted Sat Mar 25 2006 15:16:03 by Runway23
How Much Do You Hate Chelsea FC? posted Fri Mar 3 2006 14:43:14 by CHRISBA777ER
How Much Can You Bench? posted Tue Sep 12 2006 19:41:22 by DeltaOwnsAll
Mormonism: How Much Do You Know About It? posted Wed Apr 12 2006 00:53:37 by Iamcanadian
How Much Do You Post? posted Mon Apr 10 2006 11:38:08 by Lordanmol
How Much Do You Drink When Beer Is Cheap? posted Sat Mar 25 2006 15:16:03 by Runway23