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Regular Gas To Dissapear In Germany?  
User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2578 times:

Hi all,

I noticed that regular gas ("Normal Benzin" in Germany) is dissapearing more and more from gas stations here in Germany. Ok, no wonder, in the last few months it was always as expensive as the slightly better "Super".

The oil companies are inventing more and more premium brands, Aral for example has "Ultimate 100" (or even "Ultimate 102") as their premium brands and Shell has "V-Power 95" and "V-Power Racing" as their premium brands. I also noticed that the "Super Plus" gas is making a comeback since they discontinued "Normal". Now "Super" is the cheapest while "Super Plus" is the gap-filler between the cheapest "Super" and all of the aforementioned premium brands.

Aral even has "Ultimate Diesel" and Shell has "V-Power Diesel".

How is the situation in other countries all over the world? Do these premium brands also displace the cheap regular gas there as well?

Germans, what do you think? Do you fill up your car with the premuim brands?

Patrick

69 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2568 times:

In the US, at least where I live, we have Regular Unleaded, Super Unleaded, and Premium Unleaded. In Oklahoma, the octane ratings are 97, 98, 99 generally. I believe it varies from state to state. Of course, different gas stations brand the octane ratings differently. Like V-Power (Shell I think).

What I am seeing here are stations that are offering 97 octane, and 97 octane with 10% Ethanol at a cheaper price.

Personally, I don't bother filling my car up with premium. I drive a Mercedes-Benz, but I just don't see the point. I'm not racing the car, in fact, I drive it like a grandma.

UAL


User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7382 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2569 times:

Quoting Sabena332 (Thread starter):
V-Power Diesel

good stuff V-Power Diesel, I used it when in Germany earlier this year, I'm sure I felt an improvement in performance, my MINI felt more responsive, economy improved buy approx 50km more from a tank. If Shell sold it in Norway I would buy it.


User currently offlineajd1992 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2549 times:

We still get the standard petrol/diesel along with the premium stuff. Ordinary fuel is 1,40 (euro, that is) a litre here so premium is far too expensive.

User currently onlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26495 posts, RR: 75
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2542 times:

Quoting Sabena332 (Thread starter):


I noticed that regular gas ("Normal Benzin" in Germany) is dissapearing more and more from gas stations here in Germany. Ok, no wonder, in the last few months it was always as expensive as the slightly better "Super".

The weird thing about Germany is that I always saw 2 kinds of 95 (91 in the US, which is the highest you can get here)

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 1):
In Oklahoma, the octane ratings are 97, 98, 99 generally.

What? Since when? Admittedly, Oklahoma is one of like 4 states I haven't been to, but I have never seen a departure from the 87/89/91(2, 3) other than in high altitude places like Amarillo.

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 2):

good stuff V-Power Diesel, I used it when in Germany earlier this year, I'm sure I felt an improvement in performance, my MINI felt more responsive, economy improved buy approx 50km more from a tank. If Shell sold it in Norway I would buy it.

I would guess that the "V-Power" Diesel is ultra-low sulfur, which means more actual hydro-carbons to burn.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2527 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 4):
What? Since when? Admittedly, Oklahoma is one of like 4 states I haven't been to, but I have never seen a departure from the 87/89/91(2, 3) other than in high altitude places like Amarillo.

Oh, sorry, that should be 87, 88, 91. You are right.


User currently onlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26495 posts, RR: 75
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2507 times:

BTW, there is a little bit of translating needed. The US uses a different equation than Europe, but it tells the same thing. 95 octane in Europe is 91 in the US. 100 is 95-96 in the US. Indeed, one of the reasons gas is more expensive (not nearly as much of a difference as it used to be though) in Europe is because they only use higher test gas.


Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2503 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 1):
Personally, I don't bother filling my car up with premium. I drive a Mercedes-Benz, but I just don't see the point. I'm not racing the car, in fact, I drive it like a grandma.

And when your engine gets gunked up, MPG's drop and you start misfiring. Don't wonder why. There is a reason there is a minimum octane rating on the fuel door.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8541 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2500 times:

One thing to keep in mind is 95 European octane is about 90 American octane. So their 98 is roughly our premium 93. Anything bove that should be considered specialty fuel. Even Ferraris run fine on 93 American.

User currently onlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26495 posts, RR: 75
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2500 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 1):
Personally, I don't bother filling my car up with premium. I drive a Mercedes-Benz, but I just don't see the point. I'm not racing the car, in fact, I drive it like a grandma.

If the car says 91 required, put 91 in it. I'm surprised you haven't gotten computer induced knock yet. Or maybe you have and don't pay attention.

I do know some BMWs don't require 91, so if your Mercedes also doesn't require it, no problem. If it does, you have likely voided any warranty you have, along with killing your fuel economy and engine power.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2494 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 1):
Personally, I don't bother filling my car up with premium.

Same here! I tested it but I wasn't satisfied, it felt exactly like the cheaper "Super", so why should I fill my car up with the expensive stuff? (although it is recommended in the manual of my car).

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 2):
good stuff V-Power Diesel, I used it when in Germany earlier this year, I'm sure I felt an improvement in performance,

Did you really feel a difference? Maybe it is more noticable with the Diesel stuff?

Quoting ajd1992 (Reply 3):
Ordinary fuel is 1,40 (euro, that is) a litre here

Same here, yesterday Super was 1.36 EUR, earlier today it was 1.40 EUR. It is always something around 1.40 EUR.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 6):
The US uses a different equation than Europe, but it tells the same thing. 95 octane in Europe is 91 in the US. 100 is 95-96 in the US.

Interesting, I didn't know that before.

Patrick


User currently offlineiakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3313 posts, RR: 34
Reply 11, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2462 times:

Quoting Sabena332 (Thread starter):
Germans, what do you think? Do you fill up your car with the premuim brands?

I am not German so I take a liberty...so-called "premium" brands are little else than an incentive to pay a little bit more.
Pity for them that 95-98-100 are so close to each other already, they would have invented another half a dozen grades to "differentiate" the offer. It is marketing.

In Bulgaria last week I found Super Carrera (98) next to Normal Super (98), at different prices of course.
What's next ? 100 Ferrari turbo super-charged ?

In Greece, gas station employees have been instructed to try to sell the premium 98, most probably in the best interest of the car drivers...   


User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2440 times:

Quoting iakobos (Reply 11):
I am not German so I take a liberty

Gladly, you're more than welcome! Of course I didn't want to adress Germans only, sorry!

Quoting iakobos (Reply 11):
It is marketing.

Sure, thus all these fancy names like "Ultimate 102" or "V-Power Racing".

Quoting iakobos (Reply 11):
In Bulgaria last week I found Super Carrera (98) next to Normal Super (98), at different prices of course.
What's next ? 100 Ferrari turbo super-charged ?

  

Quoting iakobos (Reply 11):
In Greece, gas station employees have been instructed to try to sell the premium 98, most probably in the best interest of the car drivers...

You know what is also strange... we have full service stations (with a guy who fills up your car) at all Shells here recently. Of course do these guys recomment the best always, packed in nice sentences like: "You have a great car, it surely needs the best, eh?" while having the V-Power Racing nozzle in his hand already.

Patrick


User currently offlineKent350787 From Australia, joined May 2008, 965 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2407 times:

Standard fuel here in Australia is 91 octane (!) and its awful! It's being phased out and replaced by E10 - upping the octane rating but reducing the volumetric efficiency. As there is a price difference of up to 20% between standard and premuium fuels, standard is still the volume seller.

User currently offlineME AVN FAN From Switzerland, joined May 2002, 13920 posts, RR: 25
Reply 14, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days ago) and read 2379 times:

Quoting Sabena332 (Thread starter):
Do these premium brands also displace the cheap regular gas there as well?

I do not care at present, as some two years ago, my doctor stopped my car driving. But I still remember the year when I had just purchased my first car going on "unleaded" and planning a travel trip to the U.K. where everything was still leaded, and I frankly got a bit panicked. But then, Prince Charles rushed forward and made some big speaches in favour of unleaded petrol, and established a "movement" supporting "unleaded petrol" and when I arrived on my holidays in Britain, there were petrol stations here and there. The great Prince of Wales had saved me from trouble !! It was a small step for him, but a big thing for me ! Comparable to Edward Heath. I back in 1970 started to plan a stay in the UK to learn English. The only thing which gave me headaches was the currency with that 1:20:12 system of pound, shilling and pennies ! Right in time for me, Teddy Heath changed the old currency system into the present 1 pound to 100 pence system . You may now guess which two political figures of Great Britain are most appreciated by me ?!


User currently onlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5712 posts, RR: 18
Reply 15, posted (4 years 1 month 4 days ago) and read 2362 times:

Quoting Sabena332 (Thread starter):
How is the situation in other countries all over the world? Do these premium brands also displace the cheap regular gas there as well?

Not necessarily replace, but even supermarket gas stations like Tesco, Makro or Globus now offer "premium" gasolines.

Quoting Sabena332 (Reply 10):
Did you really feel a difference? Maybe it is more noticable with the Diesel stuff?

I don't know, I refuel the ordinary stuff. I think it's partly placebo effect and partly a marketing scam and as a matter of principle I refuse to pay for fuel more than absolutely necessary.
Shell had a pretty nasty scandal here not a long time ago, when one of the major dailies tested in labs all these "miraculous" fuels and Shell V-Power Diesel ended up last with a verdict that it is simply an ordinary, average at best diesel fuel. The scandalous discovery was, that it lacks the GTL component despite being advertised as such.

[Edited 2010-08-16 16:33:41]

User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 3102 posts, RR: 8
Reply 16, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2333 times:

We had a gas company that dispensed regular, premium, and ultra with octane between 89, 91, and 93.

Nowadays we have only two choices for the unleaded type and one diesel type. There are even some gas stations that offer regular gasoline only, but these are the independent brands, which I don't trust. I'd rather fill my car's tank with Texaco or Shell gasoline.



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlineCadet57 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 9085 posts, RR: 30
Reply 17, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2328 times:

Quoting iakobos (Reply 11):
.so-called "premium" brands are little else than an incentive to pay a little bit more.

Not really. In the US at least. My turbocharged VW recommends a minimum of 91 octane. When I first bought the car I was being cheap and figured there was no big difference. Turns out when I went thru a coil pack and a misfire and when I had to replace my spark plugs about 15k early, there was. I've been running 93 octane ever since without a problem.



Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8541 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2270 times:

Yes turbocharged cars set for premium can only run happily on prem fuel. They will "limp" on regular fuel thanks to computer knock detection. But they only run so in a constant state of stress. If the knock sensor fails you can lose pistons - it happened to a Cadillac SRX tester this year. It applied boost as if it had premium fuel, which it didn't, and the undetected knock blew the motor. Sometimes they really do expect you to use premium, most especially high pressure turbo cars so labeled. It's very easy to feel their roughness and lack of power when running regular.

User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6656 posts, RR: 11
Reply 19, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2229 times:

What was called "premium" in the OP mind was what I would call "designer gas", with a fancy name. The octane rating is not a lie. But in the US you call high octane gas "premium", hence the confusion.

Designer gas (or gasoil) is useless, and I even heard that when a gas station has both fancy and normal gas/diesel, both tanks are filled with the same stuff.

Also, keep in mind regulations on quality are harsher and harsher so even the cheapest gas is of high quality. Low sulfur is mandatory, etc. Water content must also be avoided especially for diesel, the ultra high pressure injectors of modern diesels are killed very quickly by it.

Here in France we have unleaded 95, unleaded 98 (sometimes called super 98) and gasoil (diesel fuel). Unleaded 95 is now in fact E10. My car only needs 95, but being from 2002 I'm not sure the engine can take ethanol without problems, and E10 is usually like 1-2 eurocent cheaper than 98 so I don't bother and take the 98. Never designer gas.

That E10 thing is really a good scam, BTW.

Now about 100 or 102 octane, that's almost nonexistent here but more common in Germany and Switzerland, can be useful if you have a nice engine and bring your car on a track (the only pumps in France are near tracks).

On a side note and because we're on airliners, what is also disappearing is 100LL for GA planes. The engine makers need to follow the lead of Rotax and their engines that can be run on automotive gas. Moreover, that's cheaper, and greener.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently onlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26495 posts, RR: 75
Reply 20, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2219 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 19):

Designer gas (or gasoil) is useless, and I even heard that when a gas station has both fancy and normal gas/diesel, both tanks are filled with the same stuff.

Some people like the detergents, some don't. GM Vortec truck engines had a hell of a time with Chevron's Techron additive in the late-1990s.

Quoting Aesma (Reply 19):

That E10 thing is really a good scam, BTW.

Actually, it isn't a scam. E10 is standard in California and has been for several years, after it was discovered that MTBE (the additive that replaced lead) was leaching harmful levels of manganese into ground water. Since ethanol is just basic alcohol, there aren't the environmental concerns. On the other hand, you really shouldn't worry about running your car on it.

Quoting Aesma (Reply 19):
On a side note and because we're on airliners, what is also disappearing is 100LL for GA planes. The engine makers need to follow the lead of Rotax and their engines that can be run on automotive gas. Moreover, that's cheaper, and greener.

Yes. This has been a long time coming. As are the diesel engined GA aircraft that can run on regular diesel or jet fuel (which is basically diesel).



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6656 posts, RR: 11
Reply 21, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2202 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 20):
Actually, it isn't a scam. E10 is standard in California and has been for several years, after it was discovered that MTBE (the additive that replaced lead) was leaching harmful levels of manganese into ground water. Since ethanol is just basic alcohol, there aren't the environmental concerns. On the other hand, you really shouldn't worry about running your car on it.

The scam is that ethanol should not be taxed, and cheaper anyway than petrol (less energy in it, meaning less mileage), so E10 should be significantly cheaper than before, not the other way around. If I wanted I also could blend 98 and E85, it is available at some stations including one very close to home. E85 is far cheaper than regular gas.

And I worry about the fuel lines and the valves of my car, which may or may not like ethanol. I found contradictory statements about it, so I play it safe. I don't drive much anyway, I'll drive it to the ground.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineMingToo From Zimbabwe, joined Jun 2009, 464 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2202 times:

This could be a consequence of the increasing take up of diesel.

If you want economy, then you go with diesel. If you want performance then you go with gasoline. So as more and more people go towards diesel you are left with a natural premium market for gasoline where those that would have opted for the cheapest gasoline now use diesel.


User currently onlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26495 posts, RR: 75
Reply 23, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2191 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 21):

The scam is that ethanol should not be taxed, and cheaper anyway than petrol (less energy in it, meaning less mileage), so E10 should be significantly cheaper than before, not the other way around.

There really isn't a difference with E10, because it isn't any real difference from MTBE.

Quoting Aesma (Reply 21):

And I worry about the fuel lines and the valves of my car, which may or may not like ethanol.

All I know is that my car, which is 4 years older than yours and a high performance car, has had no problems since the changeover.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineflanker From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 1638 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (4 years 1 month 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2162 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 1):
Personally, I don't bother filling my car up with premium. I drive a Mercedes-Benz, but I just don't see the point. I'm not racing the car, in fact, I drive it like a grandma.

That would all be well in a 1990 dodge, but the ECU in your Merc is probably written specifically with 93 octane at least. (which is premium), unless its older non computerized.

You can run cheaper, but your timing/fuel/air is going to be off. It is best to put in the recommended

My 01 A4 required at least 91 rating. However, my ECU was flashed for 93 as I had GIAC 1.3 bar file on there. The whole map was changed and it would have run like shit if i put in anything lower.

Same goes for all performance vehicles.

Quoting Sabena332 (Thread starter):
How is the situation in other countries all over the world? Do these premium brands also displace the cheap regular gas there as well?

Here it varies by states. In Illinois we have 87-89-91-93 and of course the higher ratings which some people use for the track. For instance SHELL V POWER is 93 octane rating.



Calling an illegal alien an 'undocumented immigrant' is like calling a drug dealer an unlicensed pharmacist
25 flanker : Except that the energy required to make it is 2:1. thats so environmental! Its like buying a prius!
26 LTU932 : If Benzin costs the same as Super Bleifrei, then I don't see a reason why regular petrol should stick around. In Costa Rica (though I don't know what
27 Rabenschlag : My car is optimized for 98 octane (European reading). So I avoid Aral and Shell, as they do not offer the proper fuel. I'd feel bad to pay for 100 oct
28 Cadet57 : Not really. It's just how the different stations differentiate the different octanes. Nothing designer about it. You seem to be the only one confused
29 Starbuk7 : I have a Dodge Ram 1500 with the Hemi engine and it recommends that I use the 89 octane gas, so that is the only gas that I have used in it. Have neve
30 Post contains links signol : In South Africa, the octane ratings for regular unleaded, super etc. are different depending on the location - in Gauteng province (Johannesburg) it i
31 N1120A : Only if you focus on idiot versions of ethanol like virgin corn. Actually, 91 generally isn't less expensive. It depends on the level of oxygenation
32 Post contains images idealstandard : Its not displacing it I don't think. I spend a lot of time in Germany and I never struggle to find regular 95. I drive a diesel and always fill it wit
33 aerorobnz : I don't put anything less than 98 in my car. I'd appreciate it if it was made mandatory to have 98 or higher here so I could buy it everywhere.
34 KiwiRob : Not true anymore there are now a lot of performance diesels, BMW, Audi, Mercedes all make them, you can even buy a diesel Porsche. For instance the B
35 Cadet57 : I was referring to the difference between 87 and 93. Then again, its only about 15-20 cents more. I also realize that 91 takes the place of 93, espec
36 A342 : As mentioned, all Diesel fuels in Europe have been ULSD by default for quite a few years now. Correct, anything above that level is useless for facto
37 falstaff : It wouldn't be computer induced. It would be the computer retarding the timing to keep it from knocking. The knock sensor would be picking up the noi
38 Cadet57 : Sure, but im still surprised he hasnt seen a CEL because of it either from a misfire or a fuel related problem.
39 falstaff : So am I. I would think that a misfire would have been detected by now. Unless that system is very good at ignition timing managment. I have seen mode
40 Cadet57 : Yeah like I said, even my lowly VW let me know that 87 was not working with the car.
41 Post contains images PHLBOS : I'm a bit here; are you saying that 'regular' gas is being replaced by premium gasoline? Here in The States, as mentioned by several other posters, t
42 Flighty : Mainly I agree with that 100% However... I have this 4 cyl carburated boat. It stumbles quite a lot when first started. It also has "drivability" iss
43 N1120A : I thought you meant the difference in price was 91 to 93. I wonder how the people tooling around in that beast here in L.A. fuel their cars? I'm unde
44 Cadet57 : Well, you thought incorrectly.
45 falstaff : That sounds more like a carb issue. I work on Mercruiser I/Os sometimes and that is a classic carb problem. I have seen shift interupter issues that
46 A342 : No 93+ octane fuel available over there?!? Having said that, like most high-performance cars, it can also run on 91 octane gas, but will not produce
47 travelin man : I live in L.A., and generally I only see 87/89/91 octane gas (I have an Audi that requires 91, so that's what I fill up with). Having said that, Cali
48 Post contains images falstaff : 93 is around at every filling station in Detroit and St. Louis, two cities where I spend a lot of time. If you want 100 and 110 leaded racing fuel (o
49 flanker : It has a better burn, of course it will help.
50 falstaff : No it doesn't. It is less volatile so it resists burning so it can be compressed tighter before the sparkplug ignites it. Flighty is likely needing h
51 Post contains images Flighty : Ding. This boat is 17 years old and that's a young boat around here. It has low hours but there could easily be some buildup / sludge. So that increa
52 Rabenschlag : It's a BMW 528 iA (MY 2000).
53 flanker : I understand what you're saying, but I have always been under the impression from what I have read that higher octanes have a resistance to heat and
54 N1120A : I remember that it used to be 92. I too wonder if the oxygenation requirements change this. Remember, we have a different system. 91 = 95 in Germany
55 Post contains images Sabena332 : So let me ask you a stupid question: Why the fuck is there no worldwide standart? Is that too fucking hard to invent? I'll buy a bus ticket tomorrow,
56 falstaff : That is true, but it only burns better in a higher compression engine, using high octane gas in an engine that doesn't need it it will not burn any b
57 Post contains images N1120A : Its just a different version of a similar equation. I didn't invent the rules.
58 A342 : I know, that's why I largely used the American system in my post. Not worth buying Super Plus, IMHO. The compression ratio is low enough to work fine
59 aerorobnz : I use only two companies. BP Ultimate & Gull (a local company) Force 10 (10% BioEthanol). I drive a Renaultsport Clio 172 and the factory recomme
60 Post contains images chrisair : There's a place here in Tucson that sells 104 octane "racing gas." I've always been tempted to run my car dry and stick a tank of that in and see what
61 falstaff : If you have a fuel injected car you will destroy the O2 sensors with the lead and it will end up running worse. I have fixed that problem a dozen tim
62 PHLBOS : At least in the U.S., just about every car 1993 vintage and newer is equipped w/fuel enjected engines. Unless Chrisair and/or others are driving some
63 falstaff : The last car sold new in the USA without fuel injection was a 1991 Dihatsu (spelling?) Charade. That was even an oddity among those junkers as most o
64 PHLBOS : I thought the 1992 Jeep Grand Wagoneer was the last new vehicle sold in the U.S. without a fuel injected engine. I have an old issue of Collectible A
65 falstaff : I think that is the case. I was referring to cars, not trucks. I am going off the text book that I teach out of. Modern Automotive Technology. Trucks
66 Cadet57 : Yeah, thats what they used standard in the 91-93 Caprice, 91 Olds Custom Cruiser. The 5.7 was optional. From 94+ the base engine was the 4.3L L99 V8.
67 idealstandard : The fact that it gives me 50 miles extra to a tank on the Munich-Dunkerque (funnily enough - 585miles) which is an average slog (all motorway) is all
68 MasterBean : Tesco sell bog standard petrol which is £1.17 a litre and 99 octane petrol, branded as Momentum which they say increases performance and mileage and
69 Post contains links A342 : Unless all conditions are comparable on every single trip, the comparison is not meaningful. And the fact that premium diesel does not deliver a subs
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