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Which One Android/iPhones Or Blackberry Phones?  
User currently offlineea772lr From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2836 posts, RR: 10
Posted (4 years 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2094 times:

I've been using Android phones for almost 2 years now and was thinking of jumping ship to the Blackberry. I used a friend's Blackberry Bold 9700 this weekend and though it didn't have a touch screen, I liked many of the other features on the phone. I love how seamlessly the Android phones sync via google to my gmail, contacts, etc. Just wondering what you guys/gals preference between these phones is? I'm currently with T-Mobile btw.


We often judge others by their actions, but ourselves by our intentions.
24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinecorinthians From United States of America, joined May 2008, 340 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2080 times:

It depends on what you want. Android, especially the higher end devices, can do a lot more. There are way more apps. The phones are generally much more powerful. Internet viewing is much better. Multitasking is better. Of course, all of this depends on the device you have. Some of the earlier Android phones (like the G1) were pretty bad.

With Blackberry, only a few phones have the touch screens and they’re not all that great. The Torch is the newest BB and it’s gotten mixed reviews. BB also has a new operating system which is pretty similar to the old one. When it comes to messaging and email, BB is second to none and nothing else compares. Also, battery life on BB devices (except the Storms) is the best of any smartphone. But you lose out because BBs are not as fast and their internet viewing experiences are poor. Only the Torch can compete with the higher end Android devices when it comes to internet viewing.

I don’t know. I just got my first Android device yesterday and have been really impressed. I wasn’t a fan of the Droid phones (except for the Droid Incredible) on Verizon, but I just got the Samsung Epic on Sprint and it’s remarkable. On TMobile, you have the Vibrant, which is from the same Galaxy family. Great phone as well, but it has some GPS issues that should be getting fixed in a software update. You guys also should be getting the G2, which is supposed to be awesome. Personally, I think BB is going downhill because they seem about two years behind the competition. But there are some who just can’t live without them.


User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25199 posts, RR: 48
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2076 times:

Happy user here of the new Palm webOS.
Excellent combination of BB like work and email productivity and iPhone like entertainment and web. Also has both a touch screen and real keyboard which is a plus.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlinemt99 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 6584 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2071 times:
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Quoting ea772lr (Thread starter):
thinking of jumping ship to the Blackberry.

Wow. That would put you in the select minority.

Most people are ditching Blackberry



Step into my office, baby
User currently offlineswissy From Switzerland, joined Jan 2005, 1734 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2062 times:

Quoting corinthians (Reply 1):
It depends on what you want.

And need 

I have a BB 9700 and it is my little office away from my office, use it not too much for browsing or have not done too much with the apps... e-mail/txt very much, battery life is fantastic, camera is oki doki, solid build... waiting to get my hands on a Torch so I can do the touchy touchy too  flipping between the apps... and having a bigger screen...

A BB is not old or behind technology... try to use a I phone as a BB or a Android as a I phone... 

If you want to jump try out the Torch...    

Cheerios,


User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2059 times:

If you want to be connected securely to your company e-mail/ Exchange server - BB is the only way to go. I've used a BB in the past and it worked seamlessly with g-mail, and the company MS Exchange based e-mail of my employer.

If your main need for a phone is not based on work/ maintaining contact with a corporation - then BB may not be the way you want to go.

Basically - for business - BB still rules, for personal use - Android in my opinion.


User currently offlineklaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 2054 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 5):
If you want to be connected securely to your company e-mail/ Exchange server - BB is the only way to go.

No, that information is seriously outdated.

I'm doing exactly that with my iPhone and my iPad – complete with enforced policies, remote wipe, hardware device encryption and so on.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15735 posts, RR: 27
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2027 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 5):
Basically - for business - BB still rules, for personal use - Android in my opinion.

That's kind of how it lines up, but I expect Android to catch up a bit in the coming years.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinefr8mech From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 5400 posts, RR: 14
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2011 times:

I just left my BB behind. Moved onto the Droid Incredible.

Of course, it helps that I don't need to be hooked up to the office anymore. The company does not support anything but BB. It does appear, from the literature, that the Incredible will work just fine on a company server.

I do like the BB calendar featues better, but the Droid is awesome when it comes to browsing and applications.



When seconds count...the police are minutes away.
User currently offlineGuitrThree From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2045 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1970 times:

Quoting fr8mech (Reply 8):
I do like the BB calendar featues better

When you download the google program (on your computer) to sync your google calendar to your outlook calendar, that makes the Android calendar pretty darn competitve.



As Seen On FlightRadar24! Radar ==> F-KBNA5
User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 10, posted (4 years 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1935 times:

I have iPhone 4, and I'm pretty happy with it. The massively improved screen is the biggest attraction - but the construction is better too - and I find the glass (front and back) is much easier to keep clean and free of smears.

The camera on it is also surprisingly good - better than I expected. Not so much in the way of megapixels, but the image quality is decent.


User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3267 posts, RR: 16
Reply 11, posted (4 years 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1929 times:

I've had the HTC Evo running Droid since it came out. I love the phone. My wife who loved her BB Curve, ditched hers for an EVO.


Yay Pudding!
User currently offlinecaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 12, posted (4 years 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1916 times:

Quoting LAXintl (Reply 2):
Happy user here of the new Palm webOS.
Excellent combination of BB like work and email productivity and iPhone like entertainment and web. Also has both a touch screen and real keyboard which is a plus.

With you on that one. I have looked and a few Android devices, and I am really not convinced yet. I really really do find Android a horrible OS, but I prefer it to IOS and RIM.

I am hoping that HP comes out with something. In the event that they don´t well i would have other option but to go with Android and I am thing the Galaxy S way.



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 13, posted (4 years 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1916 times:

Quoting ea772lr (Thread starter):
I'm currently with T-Mobile btw.

I have T-Mo as well. However, I am quite disappointed that Blackberry always gives their superior products to other cell providers and never T-mo. Honestly, I don't get it. I want a Blackberry Touch, but that is only available through AT&T in my area.

Currently, I am using the 8520.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26450 posts, RR: 75
Reply 14, posted (4 years 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1910 times:

Quoting ea772lr (Thread starter):
Just wondering what you guys/gals preference between these phones is?

For email and messaging, Blackberries are still the best. I had a Blackberry for more than 2 years before switching to an Android phone (Motorola Cliq/Dext) and prefer the Android, but still see the pros of the BB.

Quoting corinthians (Reply 1):
When it comes to messaging and email, BB is second to none and nothing else compares.

I agree here.

Quoting mt99 (Reply 3):

Most people are ditching Blackberry

I wouldn't go that far.

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 5):
I've used a BB in the past and it worked seamlessly with g-mail

It actually worked much better with Gmail than even an Android phone, as far as pushing everything from both my accounts very fast.

Quoting klaus (Reply 6):

I'm doing exactly that with my iPhone and my iPad – complete with enforced policies, remote wipe, hardware device encryption and so on.

That's because you work for Apple  
Quoting cpd (Reply 10):
I have iPhone 4, and I'm pretty happy with it.

Must not be a lefty then.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 15, posted (4 years 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1898 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 14):
Quoting klaus (Reply 6):

I'm doing exactly that with my iPhone and my iPad – complete with enforced policies, remote wipe, hardware device encryption and so on.

That's because you work for Apple

Quite the contrary - Apple works for me!   

And iOS does indeed provide proper access to Exchange servers (even policy-restricted ones), so that argument for Blackberries is just out of the window by now.


User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 3012 posts, RR: 37
Reply 16, posted (4 years 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1882 times:
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Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 13):
I have T-Mo as well. However, I am quite disappointed that Blackberry always gives their superior products to other cell providers and never T-mo. Honestly, I don't get it. I want a Blackberry Touch, but that is only available through AT&T in my area.

You got that backwards, T-Mo isn't ordering the new models until they end release pricing. T-Mo is being cheap in other words and doesn't want to pay the 15% markup that new models often have in the 1st 6-9 months.

AT&T payed big bucks to launch the 9800 1st.

Quoting klaus (Reply 6):
No, that information is seriously outdated.

I'm doing exactly that with my iPhone and my iPad – complete with enforced policies, remote wipe, hardware device encryption and so on.

That's nice, and is the entire data stream true encrypted (3DES minimum) and compressed as well? True push (and no AS isn't)? Over the Air application push and updating?

BES may not be the only horse in the exchange mobile show anymore, but it's still the best.

Quoting corinthians (Reply 1):
With Blackberry, only a few phones have the touch screens and they’re not all that great. The Torch is the newest BB and it’s gotten mixed reviews. BB also has a new operating system which is pretty similar to the old one. When it comes to messaging and email, BB is second to none and nothing else compares. Also, battery life on BB devices (except the Storms) is the best of any smartphone. But you lose out because BBs are not as fast and their internet viewing experiences are poor. Only the Torch can compete with the higher end Android devices when it comes to internet viewing.

Just to clarify:
It's BB OS6 that gives the better browsing through the webkit browser, and yes it is impressive. But no the blackberry still is not a web surfing device, if thats what you want in a phone get a droid or iphone or whatever. If you want email and messaging, get a blackberry.

Oh yes, and as one of my friends puts it right now: iPhones are nice, but they don't have anything as good as BlackBerry Messenger!



Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
User currently offlinecaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (4 years 23 hours ago) and read 1861 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 14):
For email and messaging, Blackberries are still the best. I had a Blackberry for more than 2 years before switching to an Android phone (Motorola Cliq/Dext) and prefer the Android, but still see the pros of the BB.

I wish someone would substantiate that statement. Why is BB best for messaging and email? I use WebOS and it´s notifications system is second to none. Emails get to my phone INSTANTLY. I don´t know but I think back in the day BB was best for messaging and email, and simply don´t see what makes them superior to the competition (let´s talk IOS and Android, because WebOS is really not much competition) these days. The only thing I like about about BB, really the only thing (because even RIM 6.0 leaves a lot to be desired) is the keyboard on the Bold.

BTW, they could have done much better with the Torch, in this day an age with such a slow processor, and low resolution screen. Come on, this is late 2010. We´re talking 1 GHz and 800 x 400 at least.



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 18, posted (4 years 13 hours ago) and read 1820 times:

Quoting Klaus (Reply 15):
And iOS does indeed provide proper access to Exchange servers

I'll vouch for that - I use my iphone 4 with Exchange server, and it really does work flawlessly for my calendar and emails. Though I refuse to use it for contacts however.

In fact, even on my old iPhone (OS 3.0 on iPhone 3G) the emails and meeting invites/notifications came through to the iPhone faster than they would to my actual desktop computer (Outlook 2007). Very convenient.


User currently offlinecaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (4 years 9 hours ago) and read 1803 times:

Quoting cpd (Reply 18):
In fact, even on my old iPhone (OS 3.0 on iPhone 3G) the emails and meeting invites/notifications came through to the iPhone faster than they would to my actual desktop computer (Outlook 2007). Very convenient.

That is also a good point. I have noticed that on my Palm Pre. SO I go back to the question. What actually makes BB better for messenging and email these days? I am waiting for a factual response.  



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8228 posts, RR: 8
Reply 20, posted (4 years 8 hours ago) and read 1795 times:

Quoting captaink (Reply 12):
I am hoping that HP comes out with something.

Give them a few months.

Actually, it might be wise to wait until the Jan/Feb period.

That gives HP a chance to work with the Palm OS.

And lets MS deliver their Mobile Win 7.

Adds in a few more Androids.

And a possible iPhone 5.

Add it all together and they market should be delivering far more options then.


User currently offlineManuCH From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 3011 posts, RR: 47
Reply 21, posted (4 years 6 hours ago) and read 1777 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 16):
If you want email and messaging, get a blackberry.

Oh yes, and as one of my friends puts it right now: iPhones are nice, but they don't have anything as good as BlackBerry Messenger!

My emails get to me instantly on my iPhone. I do a lot of instant messaging (for leisure and for work) with BeejiveIM, and the notifications are pushed to me instantly. How is that any inferior to BlackBerry Messenger?

I think the big pros and cons can be summed up as follows:

Blackberry:
- hardware keyboard (may be a pro or a con, that's up to personal preference)
- less apps
- compressed data stream (less roaming charges for data usage abroad)
- needs a Blackberry subscription with your carrier to fully use Push

iPhone/Android
- touch screen (some Android models also have a hardware keyboard)
- way more apps
- better overall Internet experience

Feel free to expand the lists.

That said, my experience so far with the iPhone has been stellar in the areas I need it more (emails with push, IM and Internet browsing). OTOH, the thing I hear most Blackberry users curse about is the inferior browser and the lack of apps.

There's more: most Blackberry users I know keep the Blackberry for business use (because they have to, due to some outdated company policy), and buy an iPhone for whenever they need a "mobile Internet device" for personal use. They would love to integrate their work stuff in the iPhone as well, but they're not allowed to. I think some sysadmins are simply too lazy to adapt their systems to allow iPhone integration. The iPhone does support encryption, policies, remote wipe, yada yada yada. As others said, the Blackberry *was* superior as far as corporate emails are concerned, but that's now outdated information.

Some news: the Swiss finance department has recently banned iPhones for its employees - because they found out that they "forgot" to certify whether they're secure enough or not. But up to that day, they were happily configuring Exchange sync to whoever was asking for it. The security staff is now hastily trying to catch up to certify the iPhones for government use...



Never trust a statistic you didn't fake yourself
User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 3012 posts, RR: 37
Reply 22, posted (4 years 1 hour ago) and read 1756 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

Quoting ManuCH (Reply 21):
That said, my experience so far with the iPhone has been stellar in the areas I need it more (emails with push, IM and Internet browsing). OTOH, the thing I hear most Blackberry users curse about is the inferior browser and the lack of apps.

Ok compare:

Activesync (2007/2010):

cons:
Non-encrypted (Ms claims because it goes out over port 443 it is somehow magically protected once it exits SSL... right...)
non-compressed
Policies limited to basic restrictions (password, device protection, etc)
Dependant on device client for abilities, some very limited, some not, some require addition of application
Requires device heartbeat for push
Not true push
No condition awareness on server of device
Support model is poor (Microsoft support in general is iffy, and they don't support the non-wm clients beyond very basic steps... aka "reinstall and pray")
Poor logging
Remote wipe requires device to still be connected to ActiveSync account, easily fixed if someone has device access.
Some browser intranet access (requires extra software)
Device memory may be readable if read from outside source

pros:
No extra server
Simple to setup
works on multiple device/OSes
No "central node"


Blackberry Enterprise Server (5.0):

cons:
extra server
requires some planning for setup
Requires Blackberry data service from carrier
Requires Blackberry devices or Blackberry Connect application be installed
Relies on RIM Infrastructure

pros:
all Encrypted (3DES minimum, AES available, SMIME/PGP supported)
all Compressed (alot)
True push, no heartbeat required
ITpolicy control of basically any device setting
Client is built into all Blackberries
Device awareness
Good support - end to end
Excellent logging (at least if you like reading logs)
IT control of applications push and prevention
Remote Lock/Wipe on device as long as ITpolicy present on device, not deletable from device.
OTA updates of device OS on some devices
Browser site control and Intranet access via MDS
Also available for IBM Lotus Domino and Novell Groupwise (and no that's not something Activesync can do   )
No one has been able to crack even the default Blackberry device encryption yet, and content protection passed US DOD Level 4 requirements, thats high enough to transport top secret documents.


If you ask any administrator who does both which they prefer 90% or more will say Blackberry, its just an easier all around solution for Enterprise.

Quoting ManuCH (Reply 21):
I do a lot of instant messaging (for leisure and for work) with BeejiveIM, and the notifications are pushed to me instantly. How is that any inferior to BlackBerry Messenger?

If you haven't used BBM its hard to compare them, its just a simple quick client for Blackberry to Blackberry IMing.

Just to put this in perspective, i do support and training on Blackberry, iPhone/iPaq, Android, Windows mobile, WebOS and Symbian devices, BES, Active Sync servers and various other things for a large wireless carrier. I try to not be biased but Blackberry is sooo much less trouble than any of the other things we support, and our large customers agree, most only have iphones/etc because the IT group got more fed up with users asking for them than the headaches associated with supporting them.



Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 53
Reply 23, posted (4 years ago) and read 1742 times:

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Activesync (2007/2010):

cons:
Non-encrypted (Ms claims because it goes out over port 443 it is somehow magically protected once it exits SSL... right...)

Communication is encrypted end-to-end (encrypted iPhone to secured server) and not dependent on an external provider server.

True: You need to keep the lid on your server and your certificates, as you'll need to do in any case. But that's pretty much it as far as I can see.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
non-compressed

Fortunately, since the BB compression is lossy on document attachments as far as I'm aware. I want and need the actual documents if I decide to download an attachment, not a grainy and low-quality derivative.

On an iPhone the Exchange connection is only for mail and the associated services, and for these compression makes relatively little sense and is becoming ever more irrelevant due to falling bandwith costs even with roaming.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Policies limited to basic restrictions (password, device protection, etc)

Not quite so limited - see below.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Dependant on device client for abilities, some very limited, some not, some require addition of application

The whole concept of BBs has always been that the devices were weak and limited so the server would have to do all the heavy lifting – but that is exactly why they're increasingly left behind, since modern devices are increasingly powerful and capable.

That will probably cause the demise of the BB concept before long: They just can't keep up on the device side.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Requires device heartbeat for push

Effectively every push connection is based on a heartbeat-like mechanism. You can only vary the protocol layer on which you're conducting that heartbeat. And this detail is increasingly irrelevant with increased stability and performance of the internet connection with current devices anyway.

Where is the noticeable difference between the two in real life?

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Not true push

There is no "true" push towards mobile devices. There are only slight differences in protocol design to the same end, and that end is generally met with an iPhone + Exchange just as well as with a BB.

There are minor differences remaining, but the killer argument for BB just isn't there any more – its advantage is mostly eroded and it's falling behind on more and more points which are increasingly important.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
No condition awareness on server of device

Such as?

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Remote wipe requires device to still be connected to ActiveSync account, easily fixed if someone has device access.

Not that I knew.

The second I connect my iPhone or iPad to Exchange it starts enforcing the server-required policies. I can only remove these restrictions by wiping all the Exchange information off the device.

And that's just because my server has a relatively lenient policy setup – it could also be hardcore and leave only a full device wipe as the only way out (which can also be triggered remotely or on local tampering detection).

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Blackberry Enterprise Server (5.0):

cons:
extra server
requires some planning for setup
Requires Blackberry data service from carrier
Requires Blackberry devices or Blackberry Connect application be installed
Relies on RIM Infrastructure

pros:
all Encrypted (3DES minimum, AES available, SMIME/PGP supported)

Where exactly is the security advantage over the end-to-end encryption in case of Exchange + iPhone supposed to be?

Particularly since with BB I need to route all my traffic through a RIM server while I'm autonomous and unobserved with Exchange (not least regarding communication taking place or not)?

All iOS devices since the iPhone 3GS have hardware encryption for all locally stored data, by the way, so that end is also covered.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
ITpolicy control of basically any device setting

Same on iOS devices.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Client is built into all Blackberries

Same on iOS devices.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
IT control of applications push and prevention

Same on iOS devices.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
Remote Lock/Wipe on device as long as ITpolicy present on device, not deletable from device.

Same on iOS devices. Policies can be more lenient, but they don't need to be.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
OTA updates of device OS on some devices

iOS devices could be excluded from server access unless they're updated, so that's not much of a substantial point either (slight inconvenience at most). iOS firmware updates are never done OTA.

Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
If you ask any administrator who does both which they prefer 90% or more will say Blackberry, its just an easier all around solution for Enterprise.

For administrators, users are generally just a nuisance which needs to be fought tooth and nail.

If you had always just asked administrators, we'd all use the exact same systems from the 1960s to this very day.

If that.   


User currently offlineNorthStarDC4M From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 3012 posts, RR: 37
Reply 24, posted (3 years 12 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 1689 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CHAT OPERATOR

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
No condition awareness on server of device

Such as?

Last contact time, phone number, IMEI, PIN, SIM number, OS version...
Active Sync will give you policy status with some devices, but not much more...

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
IT control of applications push and prevention

Same on iOS devices.

Not true, iOS+AS does not have native server based application push or application policy control.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Where exactly is the security advantage over the end-to-end encryption in case of Exchange + iPhone supposed to be?

Particularly since with BB I need to route all my traffic through a RIM server while I'm autonomous and unobserved with Exchange (not least regarding communication taking place or not)?

All iOS devices since the iPhone 3GS have hardware encryption for all locally stored data, by the way, so that end is also covered.

SSL can be broken, it has been. The whole reason Blackberry is having issues in the UAE and India right now is because the message stream cannot be broken into/snooped. Short of forcing S/MIME which not all AS clients support there is no other solution that can claim that.

3DES has been broken with alot of effort recently and not consistently. AES has never been compromised beyond brute strength attack packet by packet...

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Quoting NorthStarDC4M (Reply 22):
ITpolicy control of basically any device setting

Same on iOS devices.

Again not true, show me where you can force the font in iOS policy? Backlight settings? I'm not even sure it can tell a device to disable the camera or phone?

and you keep jumping to iOS, well thats nice if you want an iphone... what about other AS clients? Not to mention the problems with iOS like needing to have itunes available to setup devices out of the box (Blackberry doesn't NEED Desktop Manager to run, just charge the battery and it's good to go, all settings for email are on the device).

And let me restate this: I support both Blackberry and Exchange Active Sync, have for 6 years now, been supporting iPhone since the 3G. They are not in the same class.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Effectively every push connection is based on a heartbeat-like mechanism. You can only vary the protocol layer on which you're conducting that heartbeat. And this detail is increasingly irrelevant with increased stability and performance of the internet connection with current devices anyway.

Where is the noticeable difference between the two in real life?

Blackberry does NOT require the device to transmit once it is connected to the carrier to receive email. Blackberry uses the carrier to keep track of the device. It pushes email to the carrier it was last reported with. If the carrier cannot deliver it, it gets stored until the device registers again or 72 hours.

Activesync REQUIRES a device initiated session to push email EVERYTIME, and is therefore NOT a true push system.

Biggest real life difference? Battery Life! Blackberry will smoke an AS client on the same size battery, and we're talking 50-60% (more sometimes) better battery life vs an Activesync device in "push" mode. Tell me how long does an iPhone 3GS 16GB do on a charge with Activesync enabled? We average 28 hours for them (and that's full charge to not enough battery to connect, and that's without Bluetooth or wifi on). Blackberry 9700, mine, does about 48 hours on a charge in the same situation. And the iphone has a BIGGER battery 1620mah vs 1500mah on the 9700.

BlackBerry is no where near dead or dying... it's numbers of subscribers are growing still, and it is still the device of choice for corporations around the world. It does things ActiveSync doesn't and it does them well. Does it do EVERYTHING better than AS? Of course not, but it's still the solution to beat, the one everyone else is judged off of, and that is not going to change soon.

edit for spelling

[Edited 2010-09-04 15:52:04]


Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
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