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Can Netanyahu Actually Do It?  
User currently offlinecaliatenza From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1481 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2111 times:

I mean, we all know his past record (wye river, the planned dismantling of the Oslo records), but for some reason, he seems sincere this time. Im surprised he even agreed to the talks....maybe Obama put some pressure on him  . I seriously think that in the Middle East, its only the hard liners that can eventually come up with an agreement on something (see Rabin, Beign/Sadat, et al ). I know the PA side has to be corraled, and Hamas is the big elephant in the room...but i see something happening this time.

But my lingering question though is why is Iran involved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? They arent Arab, they are Persian...and they have numerous problems within their own country. Are they just on the bandwagon because the mullahs have nothing else to do?

48 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinedirectorguy From Egypt, joined Jul 2008, 1639 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2103 times:

Quoting caliatenza (Thread starter):
But my lingering question though is why is Iran involved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? They arent Arab, they are Persian...and they have numerous problems within their own country. Are they just on the bandwagon because the mullahs have nothing else to do?

It's partly a power dynamics thing. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict goes beyond religion, ethnicity or simple geography. A key player is the United States, and they're not Arab, or Muslim or even in the Middle East. They're basically one of the three/four principal players when it comes to brokering a solution.
Iran, however, is very much in the Middle East and has very real security concerns of its own (i.e. they don't like a nuclear Israel). At first glance both Iran and the majority of the Palestinians are Muslim-but different brands, one Shi'a, the other Sunni. These divides are a problem unto themselves, however in the face of a common enemy (Israel) Islam as a unifying factor overrides various sectarian divides. Iran wants to be a regional power-it already is, and it's increased involvement in the Palestinian question is a way of consolidating its regional position. Iran may have internal problem of its own, but they're not so overwhelming as to deter Tehran from making its presence felt.


User currently offlinecaliatenza From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1481 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2100 times:

Quoting directorguy (Reply 1):

It's partly a power dynamics thing. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict goes beyond religion, ethnicity or simple geography. A key player is the United States, and they're not Arab, or Muslim or even in the Middle East. They're basically one of the three/four principal players when it comes to brokering a solution.
Iran, however, is very much in the Middle East and has very real security concerns of its own (i.e. they don't like a nuclear Israel). At first glance both Iran and the majority of the Palestinians are Muslim-but different brands, one Shi'a, the other Sunni. These divides are a problem unto themselves, however in the face of a common enemy (Israel) Islam as a unifying factor overrides various sectarian divides. Iran wants to be a regional power-it already is, and it's increased involvement in the Palestinian question is a way of consolidating its regional position. Iran may have internal problem of its own, but they're not so overwhelming as to deter Tehran from making its presence felt.

But the US is the world's sole superpower (and Israel's main ally)...Iran is a regional player. And it was only after the Iranian Revolution that they sided with the Palestinians. Eventually, if the rest of the muslim world recognizes Israel..Iran is gonna have to as well.


User currently offlineGingerSnap From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2010, 892 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2070 times:

Quoting caliatenza (Reply 2):
But the US is the world's sole superpower

I'm sure some folk may disagree with you there  

But as far as Iran goes...well it's Israel so one almost expects them to be involved somewhere along the lines.

[Edited 2010-09-05 09:58:38]


Flown on: A306 A319/20/21 A332 B732/3/4/5/7/8 B742/4 B752 B762/3 B772/W C152 E195 F70/100 MD-82 Q400
User currently offlinedirectorguy From Egypt, joined Jul 2008, 1639 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2050 times:

Quoting caliatenza (Reply 2):
But the US is the world's sole superpower (and Israel's main ally)...Iran is a regional player. And it was only after the Iranian Revolution that they sided with the Palestinians. Eventually, if the rest of the muslim world recognizes Israel..Iran is gonna have to as well.

I don't see how in the short-term any Muslim countries will recognise Israel. They are very conservative when it comes to dealing with Israel, and as such, it would require an extraordinary event to bring about recognition of Israel. Another interesting scenario is if Israel sides with the Arab world against Iran. Already some events have hinted at that possibility. I always think of the Iran-US-Israel-Palestine issue as a power dynamic fuelled primarily by the need to be top dog. Religious/ethnic/sectarian/cultural divides are of secondary importance, albeit running parallel to the main factors that determine said power struggle.


User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 5, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2048 times:

You would think not if this is what actually happens.

http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomac...current-settlement-freeze-1.312340

Barak: Israel unlikely to extend current settlement freeze
Freeze on West Bank construction will end as scheduled on Sept. 26 - but may continue in another form, defense minister says, hinting that Israel may compromise to keep talks alive.


Abbas is not going to get a great reception if it appears he went to Washington to agree to continued building.

Interesting discussion at

http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/opinion/talk-to-us-bibi-1.312216

The ground rules are clear. On the Israeli side you must not agree to a withdrawal, Jerusalem must not be divided, no returning of refugees, and don't relinquish water resources or the Jordan valley. On the Palestinian side there is no giving up on a single inch of land but only minor land swaps, the refugee issue can be discussed, East Jerusalem is the capital of Palestine, and no settlement will remain in Palestinian territory.

......
Without this honest conversation with the Israeli public, Bibi will remain the matador, who with elegance and style drives the sword into the process, blames the Palestinians and declares that he won.


Hope that is not prophetic but it probably is.


User currently offlinecaliatenza From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1481 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 2036 times:

Quoting directorguy (Reply 4):

I don't see how in the short-term any Muslim countries will recognise Israel. They are very conservative when it comes to dealing with Israel, and as such, it would require an extraordinary event to bring about recognition of Israel. Another interesting scenario is if Israel sides with the Arab world against Iran. Already some events have hinted at that possibility. I always think of the Iran-US-Israel-Palestine issue as a power dynamic fuelled primarily by the need to be top dog. Religious/ethnic/sectarian/cultural divides are of secondary importance, albeit running parallel to the main factors that determine said power struggle.

well the Arab League has said that if the conflict is solved, then they will recognize Israel.


User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 7, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2016 times:

Quoting caliatenza (Reply 6):
well the Arab League has said that if the conflict is solved, then they will recognize Israel.

I suspect they have this funny idea that solving the conflict involves as far as the Arab League is concerned involves removing all existing settlements let alone continuing building new ones even at a reduced rate. So you are correct in principle, but DG will be right as things pan out - I fear! As someone wrote a while ago, what part of NO does Bibi not understand?


User currently offlineLTU932 From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 13864 posts, RR: 50
Reply 8, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2009 times:

Quoting caliatenza (Thread starter):
Can Netanyahu Actually Do It?

Simple answer: No. Bibi is weak, he bows down to the demands of the radical right wing elements and of the religious nutjobs in his government and within the country. He knows that whatever he does that even looks like a concession to the Palestinians, the religious factions in the government (e.g. Shas and particularly the party of Avigdor Lieberman) will break up the coalition and it's election time again.

If there's an election, the only choice Likud has to stay in power is either a Grand Coalition with Kadima (which somehow seems unlikely, given the bridges that Sharon probably burned when he left Likud to form Kadima), or a multiparty alliance with religious parties and other right wingers. Not knowing about the dynamics of Israeli politics, my guess is that if early elections are up, the best chance the peace negotiations have are with Kadima and Likud in a Grand Coalition, because it strikes me as the more moderate choice.

[Edited 2010-09-05 11:06:42]

User currently offlinecaliatenza From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1481 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1998 times:

The thing i dont get about Jerusalem is this: Why does Israel want the East side? Its all Arab neighborhoods anyways save for the Temple Mount. Maybe the UN or a 3rd party like the Swiss can administer Temple Mount/Al Asqa. The Right of Return is DOA though. No way Israel is gonna let those people come back to Israel proper..so i think the Palestinians should drop that point. As for settlements, either they get evacuated or those people can stay on in a future Palestinian state...i really think that needs to be the line here.

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 8):

Simple answer: No. Bibi is weak, he bows down to the demands of the radical right wing elements and of the religious nutjobs in his government and within the country. He knows that whatever he does that even looks like a concession to the Palestinians, the religious factions in the government (e.g. Shas and particularly Avigdor Lieberman) will break up the coalition and it's election time again.

If there's an election, the only choice Likud has to stay in power is either a Grand Coalition with Kadima (which somehow seems unlikely, given the bridges that Sharon probably burned when he left Likud to form Kadima), or a multiparty alliance with religious parties and other right wingers. Not knowing about the dynamics of Israeli politics, my guess is that if early elections are up, the best chance the peace negotiations have are with Kadima and Likud in a Grand Coalition, because it strikes me as the more moderate choice.

Well what do the Israeli people really want? I mean i think they are tired of years of conflict, bombings, counter-attacks, war, etc..etc. Im sure the same is with the Palestinian people as well. I think everyone just wants to get on with their lives and make a buck, like the rest of the world.


User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 10, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1988 times:

Quoting directorguy (Reply 4):
I don't see how in the short-term any Muslim countries will recognise Israel. They are very conservative when it comes to dealing with Israel, and as such, it would require an extraordinary event to bring about recognition of Israel. Another interesting scenario is if Israel sides with the Arab world against Iran. Already some events have hinted at that possibility. I always think of the Iran-US-Israel-Palestine issue as a power dynamic fuelled primarily by the need to be top dog. Religious/ethnic/sectarian/cultural divides are of secondary importance, albeit running parallel to the main factors that determine said power struggle.

Well, Egypt, Jordan, Turkey, and (I believe) Mauretania all recognize Israel and are Muslim countries. Morocco has for quite some time had a liaison office in Tel Aviv. I think the really interesting issue is one generally not talked about: Israel's unofficial relations with Saudi Arabia. And, if Israel chooses to strike Iran's nuclear program, I don't think the House of Saud will be that unhappy.

For what it's worth:

http://www.voltairenet.org/article143716.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/02/world/middleeast/02diplo.html

Quoting Baroque (Reply 5):


Hope that is not prophetic but it probably is.

While I really do want to remain somewhat optimistic about the talks this time, sadly I think you're right.

The 'four basic issues' still remain:

-Right of return for Palestinian refugees and their children: This is simply not going to happen. Ever. It's possible that a form of compensation could be worked out and, maybe, some kind of statement from Israel regretting the mistreatment of Palestinians during the 1948 conflict. But that's it.
-East Jerusalem as a capital for Palestine: Even a small precinct in EJ would be so symbolic for Arabs everywhere. Also, unfettered access to the Dome of the Rock for prayer would be a very good gesture on Israel's part.
-Dismantling of the settlements in Palestine: This will happen in due course I think. The impetus for that would be a decision by the Israeli government to abandon the settlers (who, let's face it, are one of the main drivers in this conflict). Either they move back to Israel or they become Palestinian citizens and take their chances. I think the choice would be an easy one. This option really is in Israel's longer-term interests.
-The borders: I think they have to be substantially 1967 borders, perhaps with some land swaps.

Solving any of these vexing issues would be a huge win, but resolving all of them during these meetings would be a miracle. But, hey, look at those miners in Chile...that's a miracle.

-



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 2667 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1977 times:

Quoting caliatenza (Reply 2):
Eventually, if the rest of the muslim world recognizes Israel..Iran is gonna have to as well.

Not really. Many have said that once the Israel-Palestine issue is over they will extend recognition to Israel, but that by no means is compulsory.

I bring this:

Quoting caliatenza (Reply 6):
well the Arab League has said that if the conflict is solved, then they will recognize Israel.

And the reality is that though the Arab League (yes I know that Muslim world and Arab League are two different things) has the deal that once the conflict is solved they'll extend recognition to Israel, there are still some concerns. Take Syria. Would Syria just extend recognition and offer peace when Syria is still trying to re-take the Golan Heights? Syria would just see it as one hurdle less.

Quoting LTU932 (Reply 8):
will break up the coalition and it's election time again.

I think that if Netanyahu had a majority he would have proceeded with the negotiations a long time ago.



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlinecaliatenza From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1481 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1961 times:

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 11):
And the reality is that though the Arab League (yes I know that Muslim world and Arab League are two different things) has the deal that once the conflict is solved they'll extend recognition to Israel, there are still some concerns. Take Syria. Would Syria just extend recognition and offer peace when Syria is still trying to re-take the Golan Heights? Syria would just see it as one hurdle less.

Well the Syrian negotiations have to be seperate in this case.


User currently offlineracko From Germany, joined Nov 2001, 4856 posts, RR: 20
Reply 13, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 1932 times:

As far as I remember Olmert was very close to reach an agreement with Syria. That probably wouldn't be the problem.

A bigger problem might be that Bibi has no control over his coalition: http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomac...not-see-middle-east-peace-1.312364


User currently offlinekachum From Belarus, joined Jul 2006, 64 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 1927 times:

Netanyahu is the prime minister of Israel, not A.net. As such he should do what is best for Israel, and not what is best by any other popular opinion, be it of A.net, US, UN etc. And he should follow doctor's principle: when in doubt, do not do anything at all, so that no harm is done. There is no rush. Then everything will be A OK.

User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 2667 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1913 times:

Quoting kachum (Reply 14):
As such he should do what is best for Israel, and not what is best by any other popular opinion, be it of A.net, US, UN etc

Then I suppose Hitler should have remained as Fuhrer of Germany. After all, he was doing what is best for Germany, and not by the US or Britain. Yet the world recognizes that existing and further Israeli settlements in the West Bank are illegal since those lands are meant for a Palestinian state.

Quoting kachum (Reply 14):
when in doubt, do not do anything at all, so that no harm is done. There is no rush. Then everything will be A OK.

   Problem! Nothing's been done for far too long. Someone has to break the ice and whether Israel likes it or not, they must return to their designated 1967 borders. The issue here is also a political one. The second a Prime Minister accedes to return land his political career will be ruined but that's a risk politicians have faced and one that Israeli politicians must eventually face one way or another.



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlinekachum From Belarus, joined Jul 2006, 64 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1889 times:

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 15):
Problem! Nothing's been done for far too long. Someone has to break the ice and whether Israel likes it or not, they must return to their designated 1967 borders

So returning to 1967 borders is just "breaking the ice", or, since you brought Hitler in here, "the final solution"?

[Edited 2010-09-05 15:18:48]

User currently offlineTheCommodore From Australia, joined Dec 2007, 2550 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1875 times:

Quoting Baroque (Reply 7):
I suspect they have this funny idea that solving the conflict involves as far as the Arab League is concerned involves removing all existing settlements let alone continuing building new ones even at a reduced rate. So you are correct in principle, but DG will be right as things pan out - I fear! As someone wrote a while ago, what part of NO does Bibi not understand?

Yes I agree, I think this is central to the entire process in the peace talks. If Abbas can't take Israels word that all settlements will stop and some if not all are handed back over time then I'm not sure we will get the desired outcome that we all hope for out of these talks.

Quoting kachum (Reply 14):
There is no rush. Then everything will be A OK.

There should be plenty of "rush" as you put it. And NO, there is not plenty of time either I don't think. The world at large is really sick and tired of the instability caused by Israels problems with its neighbors. I think we ALL want it fixed ASAP don't you ?

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 15):
Yet the world recognizes that existing and further Israeli settlements in the West Bank are illegal since those lands are meant for a Palestinian state.

Exactly, hence my point above.

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 15):
Problem! Nothing's been done for far too long. Someone has to break the ice and whether Israel likes it or not, they must return to their designated 1967 borders. The issue here is also a political one. The second a Prime Minister accedes to return land his political career will be ruined but that's a risk politicians have faced and one that Israeli politicians must eventually face one way or another.

Bingo, said very well.
  



Flown 905,468 kms or 2.356 times to the moon, 1296 hrs, Longest flight 10,524 kms
User currently offlinekachum From Belarus, joined Jul 2006, 64 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 1840 times:

Quoting TheCommodore (Reply 17):
I think we ALL want it fixed ASAP don't you ?

I suspect we all want different things. I think it should be fixed right and in a way that guarantees Israel's security. ASAP is secondary to that.

Btw if you want something ASAP you should be prepared to pay the premium.


User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 2667 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1830 times:

Quoting kachum (Reply 16):
Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 15):
Problem! Nothing's been done for far too long. Someone has to break the ice and whether Israel likes it or not, they must return to their designated 1967 borders

So returning to 1967 borders is just "breaking the ice", or, since you brought Hitler in here, "the final solution"?

Look at it this way. You moved into an urban zone and right next to your house is an empty space that is meant for a person to build his/her house. The land developer (UN) gives you control of that piece of land but states the land is completely for another person. You're just supervising it. Every day you move your fence a little more inside that piece of land. Should you expect the person that's coming to build the house to be happy with what he's got? Will you say that he's lucky to have any land at all? I think not.

Let's say this person likes to throw loud late night parties and say it's the Palestinians equivalent of launching rockets. Is it YOUR position to deny this person the piece of land that is meant for him just because of the parties he throws? NO. What do you do? You call law enforcement. You don't take matters into your own hands, which is the lesson Israel needs to learn here.

So to answer your question, the return to 1967 borders is breaking the ice as there are still many other concerns for the Palestinians. What about a collective and mutual security agreement where both sides will abstain from violence to one another? Economic cooperation with the neighboring countries? Palestinian refugees? Palestinian settlements? There's no need for a "final solution" here. Simply every country to their designated borders and all land taken during war, returned.



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlineTheCommodore From Australia, joined Dec 2007, 2550 posts, RR: 6
Reply 20, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1826 times:

Quoting kachum (Reply 18):
I suspect we all want different things.

I dare say that's part of the problem

Quoting kachum (Reply 18):
I think it should be fixed right and in a way that guarantees Israel's security.

Well, not only Israels security, and what of the others in the region ? what about security for them too ?
You see, it must be a fair and equatable compromise between the tow sides, not always in Israels favor, wouldn't you agree ?

Quoting kachum (Reply 18):
Btw if you want something ASAP you should be prepared to pay the premium.

Um.... How long has this been going on now ?

Since 1967 or before that or sometime after that. Whatever, it's a long time in anyone's book. Hardly something that you should be made to pay a premium for after this long.

BTW, just what do you call premium ?

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 19):
Simply every country to their designated borders and all land taken during war, returned.

Yes, as you say it should be simple, but human emotions run hot and sensibility dose not always prevail at times.



Flown 905,468 kms or 2.356 times to the moon, 1296 hrs, Longest flight 10,524 kms
User currently offlinekachum From Belarus, joined Jul 2006, 64 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1823 times:

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 19):
So to answer your question, the return to 1967 borders is breaking the ice as there are still many other concerns for the Palestinians. What about a collective and mutual security agreement where both sides will abstain from violence to one another? Economic cooperation with the neighboring countries? Palestinian refugees? Palestinian settlements? There's no need for a "final solution" here. Simply every country to their designated borders and all land taken during war, returned.

Hm, what an offer. Like I said, no rush. Maybe in the next generation.

[Edited 2010-09-05 20:56:53]

[Edited 2010-09-05 20:58:12]

User currently offlineSOBHI51 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jun 2003, 3239 posts, RR: 17
Reply 22, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1800 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

What on offer is peace, unless you think that is not good enough.
Look at history, no big power stayed that way for ever, do you have any guaranties for the next generation in Israel or any other part in the ME?



I am against any terrorist acts committed under the name of Islam
User currently offlinecaliatenza From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1481 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1798 times:

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 19):


So to answer your question, the return to 1967 borders is breaking the ice as there are still many other concerns for the Palestinians. What about a collective and mutual security agreement where both sides will abstain from violence to one another? Economic cooperation with the neighboring countries? Palestinian refugees? Palestinian settlements? There's no need for a "final solution" here. Simply every country to their designated borders and all land taken during war, returned.

Hamas has to agree..and so far (the shooting of the Israeli settlers last week), they dont seem to agree the talks are going to go anywhere.


User currently offlineTheCol From Canada, joined Jan 2007, 2032 posts, RR: 6
Reply 24, posted (3 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1796 times:

Quoting caliatenza (Reply 6):
well the Arab League has said that if the conflict is solved, then they will recognize Israel.

Good luck with that. The extremists aren't going to simply disappear. The only thing different will be more Arab on Arab violence.

Quoting einsteinboricua (Reply 11):
Would Syria just extend recognition and offer peace

Syria will do what Iran tells them to do.

Quoting caliatenza (Reply 12):
Well the Syrian negotiations have to be seperate in this case.

Don't expect any peace negotiations with Syria. There will be no peace in the region until Iran is taken out of the picture.



No matter how random things may appear, there's always a plan.
25 Baroque : I suppose you realise you are inviting the rewrite to "There will be no peace in the region until both Israel and Iran are taken out of the picture"?
26 ly001 : I think the question of the thread should be: " Can Mahhmud Abbas actually do it? Can the Palestinianes finally get to a decision?" Histoory in the Pa
27 ly001 : Do you mean steps like removing settelments from Gaza for breaking the ice? If the other side has demand for security then they can put it on the tab
28 EDKA : Don't be surprised, its always easy to blame Israel. The Palestinians are more dysfunctional and disjointed than ever, with outside forces such as Sy
29 slz396 : Everybody in Israel CAN do it, they just have to be MADE to do it by the US President. The content of the future Palestinian-Israeli agreement is clea
30 Post contains images Severnaya : No, the US is by far not the only superpower in the world. You seem to forget the EU and the BRIC countries. It's actually more the reverse, how much
31 Quokka : Two countries, Egypt and Jordan, already have. Turkey has as well, although officially it is not a Muslim State despite the majority of the populatio
32 kachum : This is very naive
33 slz396 : No it isn't. if Obama decides to play the music, Israel MUST dance to it, it's as simple as that... Let's hope Obama is as resolved on peace in the m
34 kachum : I guess then "we ALL" should take it up with Obama when the whole thing is not resolved ASAP.[Edited 2010-09-06 07:16:18]
35 Post contains links kachum : If you want to throw the refugees issue in there, don't forget about these refugees. http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Op-EdContributors/Article.aspx?id=1
36 Post contains images Baroque : Nice post. The single state should frighten the bejabers out of them, but somehow it does not. I guess with the armoury available, they will be able
37 ltbewr : A hard pro-Israel, 'right' wing politcan may be the only one in Israel that can do it. Netanyahu is defentiely in that category. I think another major
38 Baroque : You are not wrong there. Mind you do not get excited by how large the fields are, all discoveries are HUGE when the finders are trying to raise the f
39 directorguy : Sorry, should've clarified, I meant I don't see how many more Muslim nations will recognise Israel. All the liberal ones already have-Egypt, Jordan,
40 Post contains links Baroque : As best one can gather, the US generals will have been telling Obama that indeed he does have a strong security interest in the region and it is not
41 caliatenza : I am merely repeating the media's take on the situation. Thing is, Bibi has traditionally been a hardliner, but at the same time, its the hardliners
42 directorguy : That's absolutely correct of course. Now, the question remains whether US policymakers will face reality (that the USA's position in the region is de
43 Post contains images TheCommodore : Might be made easier if Israel stopped building settlements, gave back the land that has illegally been taken from the Palestinians. That may help an
44 kachum : And if grandma had the balls she would be a grandpa (Russian expression). For US to switch support from Israel to the other side, either US or the ot
45 Severnaya : I'm saying that you're generalizing way too much that the world is tired of bickering between Israel and its neighbors. Take for example me, i'm not
46 Baroque : Which election are you standing for? The number of constituencies in which that stance would get you elected is diminishing. And it might prove an ob
47 Post contains images TheCommodore : I'm starting to think that you need to take the rose coloured glasses off, if you really see it that way. I very much doubt that so many in the world
48 par13del : I will only add that NOTHING is responsible for the broader acceptance of the 1967 borders, initially it was simply a UN decision, since then based o
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