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Only Child Wants To Move Away From Home  
User currently offlineKLM672 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2468 posts, RR: 3
Posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4183 times:

Hello everyone.
Just looking for a bit of advice. I've been an "on again, off again" college student for nearly 6 years now. I've gotten Full Time jobs and have dropped out of college all together. Other times, I was able to take a few classes on the side. Once, I even moved out of town, about 600 miles away from home, and gained some aviation experience as an FA. Being an FA (with obviously flight benefits), I was able to create a schedule in which I could be at home a few weeks at a time. After the year-long stint as FA I returned home and enrolled back into college, full time. I am not at the end of my college career and will be graduating in May. I've made it known that I'd like to move out of state. In my small New England state, there is nothing for me. I am into aviation and our local airport (an hour drive away) is small. The biggest aircraft it sees is the A320.

I have an uncle in the DFW area and was able to visit him a few years ago. I fell in love with DFW and was amazed at what it has to offer for jobs, weather, prices (in comparing prices, you'd pay the same for a nice apartment in DFW as you would for a dump where I live).

Today, while having coffee with my mom and her long-time friend, she announced that I had plans to move after I graduate. She then began to cry.. I will be moving with my long-time girlfriend who is equally excited about the opportunities ahead. Her parents seem to be "ok" with the move. My mom wants us to move back home when the baby comes, but at 24 years old, a baby isn't even on the radar for us. How do I deal with this? I am excited about moving and bettering my life, but I don't want to leave my mom all sad. She is in a happy marriage with my father (who doesn't seem to know about the move), so its not like I am up and moving and leaving her all alone here. I will get an aviation job in the DFW area, so I'll still have flight benefits (but to her, that doesn't seem to matter). I am an only child which makes it even harder (for the record, so is my gf). Any thoughts or stories?
Thanks!

*please try to not say "its your life, do whatever, as I know that but it was very hard to see her cry today*

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6305 posts, RR: 33
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4170 times:

You're about 6 years overdue to leave your mothers home. As for her being sad, you'll maybe in 18 years feel it also, we all do.


Damn, this website is getting worse daily.
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4160 times:

Quoting KLM672 (Thread starter):
*please try to not say "its your life, do whatever,

Unfortunately for you that's what you're going to have to do.You're going to have to suck up seeing her crying, and she's going to have to suck up seeing you leaving. Been there, done that, more times than I'd like to admit.

She will get over it eventually. Don't think much about it. Moms will always be moms and most will cry rivers when their little baby leaves the nest.


User currently offlinephotopilot From Canada, joined Jul 2002, 2767 posts, RR: 18
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4143 times:

It's all about control. Who is in control of your life? Yourself (and your girlfriend) or is Mommy still in control? The very fact she states she wants you to move back home when "baby" comes along clearly shows this.

I'd RUN as fast and as far away as possible and as quickly as possible.

It is YOUR life, YOUR independence, and someday YOUR family. It's a no-brainer decision.


User currently offlineasuflyer05 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2373 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4137 times:

I moved away from home at 18 - my mother cried.

I moved near my parents home at 21 - my mother cried.

I moved away from home at 23 - my mother cried.

I recently moved back to the same coast as my mother - she cried.

You have to do what is truly right for you and your girlfriend. Look at it as an adventure. All the rest will fall in line.


User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4119 times:

Quoting asuflyer05 (Reply 4):
I moved away from home at 18 - my mother cried.

I moved near my parents home at 21 - my mother cried.

I moved away from home at 23 - my mother cried.

I recently moved back to the same coast as my mother - she cried.

LOL sounds almost as bad as my mom. Heck, she almost cries every time I go on a flight or any trip longer than a day  


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8320 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4117 times:

It's only September - you have a long time to think about your options before you graduate.

It may be that there are aviation jobs closer, or that you'll get into a company that offers travel benefits. It's amazing how Mothers can get involved in other things when they aren't taking care of you.

It's also amazing how beneficial mothers can be when (and if) you do have children. Grandfathers aren't half bad either and I'm a pretty skilled grandfather these days - especially after the diaper days are past.

Take you time, think it over and talk it over. This is a country where you can always rent a truck and move somewhere.


User currently offlinevio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1440 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4116 times:

Quoting IMissPiedmont (Reply 1):
You're about 6 years overdue to leave your mothers home..

I really don't agree with you. This is a stupid "Western / North American" practice that is aimed at enslaving young people into paying rent, buying a house etc.


@ KLM672

If you have a good family and have it good at home, why leave? Save your money, see the world and enjoy life. True, there are some small sacrifices one must make to leave under the parental roof, but I think they are well worth it.

It's a bit hypocritical of me to say this, since I moved away from home at the age of 21 after graduating college, but I wanted to see the world. I do regret it now. I should've stayed at home and finish CPL while living with my parents. By moving on my own I had more independence, but it was so hard for me. I had to work full time as an engineering to afford rent, food and pay my flight school... It was VERY HARD.

So my advice to you...

If you want to move away just to be away, don't do it. If you want to move away for a specific reason, go for it, but weigh your options and make sure you benefit from it.



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineeinsteinboricua From Puerto Rico, joined Apr 2010, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 4112 times:

Quoting KLM672 (Thread starter):
please try to not say "its your life, do whatever, as I know that

Sorry for sounding rude, but what else can we say? Are you ready to leave the nest, financially, professionally, and emotionally? If the answer is yes to all three, then fly away.

I still haven't left my nest (I'm still in college) but I know and my parents know that when I have a job and can manage being alone, I'll leave the nest. And if you leave with the certainty that if you should fall your parents will be there no matter what, then you should have nothing to worry about.

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 2):
Moms will always be moms and most will cry rivers when their little baby leaves the nest.

Heck, moms even cry when the baby goes to other nests nearby. My mom almost cried when I went and slept over at my cousin's house many years ago. She also cried when I went to Orlando, Europe, and recently Memphis. But she says that helps her get ready for when the time comes.



"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4077 times:

Quoting vio (Reply 7):
This is a stupid "Western / North American" practice that is aimed at enslaving young people into paying rent, buying a house etc.

              

Many of us do seriously feel the need to move out of their parents house. It's certainly not because society tells me to in my case. Yet ,I'm a 26 y/o still living (extremely reluctantly) with his parents. I have a job (that pays peanuts) a car and what have you not. Yet I simply can't afford moving out. Do I need to move out? Yes, but just to keep my mental sanity. I can't stand living with my parents, as good as they are, it's like some biological clock went off in my head saying I need out, NOW. I really miss my independence, having my own apartment in college and what not, that was bliss. And it's not like my parents have a curfew for me or like they're strict, quite the opposite actually, however, I just feel like I need to GTFO out of this nest. Hard to explain, must be biological, but it has caused many unnecessary altercations with my parents. I know many friends in my place that can really relate.


User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4054 times:

At 18 I joined the USAF, my patients boarded up the house and left on five year vacation. I was happy and they were happy.

User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5670 posts, RR: 10
Reply 11, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4054 times:

Quoting vio (Reply 7):
If you have a good family and have it good at home, why leave? Save your money, see the world and enjoy life. True, there are some small sacrifices one must make to leave under the parental roof, but I think they are well worth it.

It's a bit hypocritical of me to say this, since I moved away from home at the age of 21 after graduating college, but I wanted to see the world. I do regret it now. I should've stayed at home and finish CPL while living with my parents. By moving on my own I had more independence, but it was so hard for me. I had to work full time as an engineering to afford rent, food and pay my flight school... It was VERY HARD.

So my advice to you...

If you want to move away just to be away, don't do it. If you want to move away for a specific reason, go for it, but weigh your options and make sure you benefit from it.

Wow.... I thoroughly disagree but I know that for each person it is different. I would say that the specific reason of it being "hard" is exactly the reason to move away. Life is not easy and you need to be exposed it (if you are capable of functioning in the world) in order to learn how to live and exist in the world at large. And the earlier you do it the better. When my kids grow up I will very much be supportive of them to leaving the nest and getting into life. One needs to learn to take control of their life and live it and that takes experience.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 9040 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 4045 times:

Quoting KLM672 (Thread starter):
*please try to not say "its your life, do whatever, as I know that but it was very hard to see her cry today*

When all is said and done, and there is a loving relationship, never forget, your Mother is your best friend. I always told my children, you are free to move out, just do not burn the bridges on the way out, and you will have a way to return in tough times. My children never left until they were both married. they both live near me, I have a very close realtionship with both and with my grandchildren. I would be heartbroken if they left the area. I wish you luck with your decision.



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlinevio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1440 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4032 times:

Quoting tugger (Reply 11):
Wow.... I thoroughly disagree but I know that for each person it is different. I would say that the specific reason of it being "hard" is exactly the reason to move away

True, but hey, there's a difference between working hard / facing life and just going out totally unpreparred. I'm the best example. I left home after finishing college. I hated engineering and I never wanted to do it. All I wanted to do was be a pilot. My parents told me: "Stay here, save your money and go be a pilot". I didn't listen to them and I left home at 21 years of age.

The next 3 years I've spent working my ass off, day and night, work, study, fly... If I would've listened to my parents I would've probably been a captain by now.

Don't get me wrong. Staying with your parents till you're 40 is wrong, but staying with them until you've achieved your goals and are ready to start living the life you want is not bad. Of course, all within reason.

Then again, I'm also Eastern European and staying home with mom and dad until you're married is totally acceptable... even if you're 30.... not that I would do it. The point here is DON'T LEAVE UNLESS YOU ARE PREPARED FOR LIFE!... whatever that life is...



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineairportugal310 From Tokelau, joined Apr 2004, 3656 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4023 times:

I mostly agree with Fly2HMO...you have to do what you have to do. If you can afford to leave, then do what is best for you. After all, your mom did the same at one point so it can't come as a total surprise that this would happen some day.

Quoting vio (Reply 7):
I really don't agree with you. This is a stupid "Western / North American" practice that is aimed at enslaving young people into paying rent, buying a house etc.

That is a rather general statement that, I believe, is largely unfounded. Some people have to move for jobs (as I did), some because of issues at home, etc.. Everyone has a reason for leaving, and that reason is not for us to decide as "stupid".

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 12):
When all is said and done, and there is a loving relationship, never forget, your Mother is your best friend.

Very true. My mother was sad as well, but understood the reality of the situation. I still visit my parents once every week or so to have lunch and catch up, she still makes me food to take back to my place, offers me money without me asking, etc... At 26, I only moved out last year and enjoyed my time living at home; if things ever got to the point where I had to move back, I would not hesitate for a second.



I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 9040 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4020 times:

Quoting tugger (Reply 11):
When my kids grow up I will very much be supportive of them to leaving the nest and getting into life. One needs to learn to take control of their life and live it and that takes experience.

Tugg

When one is old and gray, and if there were no family near, to me that would be very sad. I think people who are that independant because they were encouraged to be, tend to not give a dam about family. I think we can see the loss of family values every day now. My family and my wife's family stayed close, we all live in the area, not twenty miles between us, and as time has thinned us, I thank goodness that I have family and not strangers near. I do not want to depend on a stranger.



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 9040 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3988 times:

Quoting airportugal310 (Reply 14):
Very true. My mother was sad as well, but understood the reality of the situation. I still visit my parents once every week or so to have lunch and catch up, she still makes me food to take back to my place, offers me money without me asking, etc... At 26, I only moved out last year and enjoyed my time living at home; if things ever got to the point where I had to move back, I would not hesitate for a second.

A very wise attitude, every family is different, but most of the time, they are the help you can count on when times are tough.



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5670 posts, RR: 10
Reply 17, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3935 times:

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 15):
When one is old and gray, and if there were no family near, to me that would be very sad. I think people who are that independant because they were encouraged to be, tend to not give a dam about family. I think we can see the loss of family values every day now. My family and my wife's family stayed close, we all live in the area, not twenty miles between us, and as time has thinned us, I thank goodness that I have family and not strangers near. I do not want to depend on a stranger.

I absolutely agree that strong family ties are good and important. And well, my whole family lives in the same county and so does my wife's (except for her brother who is in the Navy, but even he worked to get stationed in the state and is almost always at the major family gatherings which happen several times a year). Regarding my wife, our first conversation, what started our entire relationship was a conversation about our mothers and how important they are. We see family at least twice a week. Family is the core of ones life and is very important.

But it doesn't preclude encouraging one's children to go out and explore. There is always "home" as the ultimate refuge if it is needed. Go, live, try new things, meet new people, remember what you learned and apply it.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineOzGlobal From France, joined Nov 2004, 2723 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 3905 times:

I agree with the comments about 'control'. Separate out the emotion from the thing.

i) You seem to have trouble completing a course of action: degree, job, moves, etc and end up back with mom.
ii) She is making announcements to friends in your presence, then adding courses of action for you to which you have not agreed. This sounds like subtle manipulation.
iii) Crying in front of you and her friend could be a sign of affection, but equally fear of loss of control. Does she fear she loses identity if she hasn't got you to 'look after.' (I once had a 36 year old flat mate whose mother used to call him long distance every morning to tell him it was time to get up. At 38, he moved back home, where she wanted him. He was the most emotionally immature person I have ever lived with and he let her ruin his life with 'care').
iv) The 'baby' is a secret weapon by which she can be newly 'needed / helpful' to you. This sounds more like 'need to be needed' than a free and autonomous generosity. Be careful.

Conclusion: Forget the emotion here, it is largely manipulative and you are both playing at it, I suspect. Make your decsion based on reason. Move where you want to be to achieve what you need to achieve. Visit and be a good son to your mon and you relationship will be freer and more genuinely loving.



When all's said and done, there'll be more said than done.
User currently offlinecasinterest From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4669 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3833 times:

When it's time to go, it is time to go.

For me, it was when I was 18 and on the way to college. My parents were divorced, I couldn't stand my Stepmother and I couldn't deal with my mother. For me the hardest part about leaving was saying goodbye to my Grandparents. They were the true anchors I had to home. Luckily college was 300 miles away, and it wasn't out of the question to make the 4-5 hour drive home.

Quoting vio (Reply 7):
I really don't agree with you. This is a stupid "Western / North American" practice that is aimed at enslaving young people into paying rent, buying a house etc.

I disagree here. 18 is the age when you are legally an adult. At that point high school is done, and you either get a job, or you go to college. Some lucky few go on some nice trips for a year or two. For me, getting out of the house and home helped me see many parts of the world and cultures I hadn't seen yet.
I miss home, but that is what visits are for.



Older than I just was ,and younger than I will soo be.
User currently offlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6122 posts, RR: 29
Reply 20, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3779 times:
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Quoting vio (Reply 7):
I really don't agree with you. This is a stupid "Western / North American" practice that is aimed at enslaving young people into paying rent, buying a house etc

I graduated from high school when I was 19 and couldn't wait to go to college and get my own place. It wasn't because I didn't get along with mom and dad, but that I wanted my own place. I moved into my house when I was 24 and bought the place when I was 26, not because society told me I should but because I wanted to.


I am an only child and I live in metro Detroit and mom and dad live in St. Louis. I moved out pf my parents house for good when I was 24 (when I graduated from college. I always had my own place, but I still had a lot of my stuff at mom and dad's and would stay there in the summers when I came back to St. Louis to work. Plus I kept at least on of my cars there.

Quoting asuflyer05 (Reply 4):
I moved away from home at 18 - my mother cried.

Mom did the same when I was 19.

I visit St. Louis on a regular basis so I have a place to visit. Mom and dad say the same thing about me living in Detoit, they have a place to visit.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineScarletHarlot From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 4673 posts, RR: 56
Reply 21, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3738 times:

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 15):
When one is old and gray, and if there were no family near, to me that would be very sad. I think people who are that independant because they were encouraged to be, tend to not give a dam about family. I think we can see the loss of family values every day now. My family and my wife's family stayed close, we all live in the area, not twenty miles between us, and as time has thinned us, I thank goodness that I have family and not strangers near. I do not want to depend on a stranger.
Quoting tugger (Reply 17):
I absolutely agree that strong family ties are good and important.

You guys are very lucky to be so close to your families. Some of us have families that let us down time and time again. I have no desire to interact closely with my blood family. I have no problem living 2000 miles away from them. Fortunately, I have built a wonderful set of friends here who are my family now. They do not let me down.

Quoting WarRI1 (Reply 16):
every family is different, but most of the time, they are the help you can count on when times are tough.

A dear friend of mine had a stroke last year. She is a single lady with no kids, and she's retired. Her sister came up from California to 'help' her. In doing so the sister had some of my friend's pets seized by animal control and euthanized. This was absolutely unnecessary and was a huge betrayal of my friend. When my friend (in a rehab center recovering from her stroke, mind you!) found out about this and told her sister what she thought of it, the sister said "okay, you don't appreciate my help, I'm going back to California" and took my friend's chequebook and financial documents and her jewelry! Fortunately I found out what was going on and another friend and I were named power of attorney and helped to get my friend home and deal with her finances.

Sometimes the family you choose is better than the family you're born with.

To the OP - it is YOUR life. You must live it. I'm an only child too. I left home at 18 and went back for only a few months after that. Best thing I ever did.



But that was when I ruled the world
User currently offlineMCO2BRS From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2007, 540 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3693 times:

Without repeating what others have already said, I'll tell you what I have done. Both sides of my family are extremely independent people, with one exception - my mother. I have always been a totally independent spirit, and started to make plans to move out at 17 (My dad left his parents at age 16, my older brother bought his first house at 18) but after much debate my parents forbade me to move out. It wasn't until just before my 20th birthday that my parent went on vacation. I seized the opportunity, packed up and moved in with a friend about 15 miles away. My parents weren't too pleased, but once I was out, I had no intention of returning.

I successfully lived away from home and supported myself (living either with roommates, alone or with a partner) up until October of last year. I was living alone and became seriously ill, cut a long story short much to my disappointment reached the point where I was no longer able to care for myself, and had to move back in with my parents in February because I needed 24hr care.

I've spent the last 8 months recovering and now my partner lives with me here at my parents place, and we are about to move to the UK and start new lives there in a couple of weeks. She has lived in Japan on and off for several years so her family is used to her being away and not seeing her for a year or more at a time. My family has always been split up across 2 or 3 continents as well.

Don't do it unless you are fully prepared to deal with anything life can throw at you. You have to be prepared to fall on your face, and to learn from your mistakes, but you also have to be able to pick yourself back up and keep going. Its not going to be easy, but the more planning you do, and the more you communicate to your family what your plans are, the more likely they are to understand that you are more than capable. And just remember, your mother is going to cry no matter what - mine does!

Hope this helps.

MCO 2 BRS


User currently offlineLufthansa411 From Germany, joined Jan 2008, 692 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 3577 times:

As much of it has been said at this point, I will just add a couple of things:

Your mother, just like mine when I was first moving out, has 2 big issues. The first is the thought of losing you. I am very close with my mom, and so when I moved out, it was hard for her. She needed time to get used to the idea, and from the sound of things, so does your mom. Especially since it is somewhat "unexpected". At least you have told her early enough that she can get herself used to the idea.

The second thing is what my mom now calls "Grandchild Separation Anxiety". Once you get to be a teen, and are a pain in the ass to deal with, parents start looking forward at being able to interact with their grandkids. Unfortunately, if you are far away that does not happen. My mom is in NY, my sister in NC, my brother wanders, and I am in Berlin. She laments the fact that she will not get to "grow up with her grandkids" the same way both my grandmothers have. It is just the world we live in. Again, it takes time for her to get used to the idea of not being able to see them as often as they would like.

My advice is to download skype and make sure she knows how to use it. My mom does not get to see my niece often in person, but video chatting has helped a great deal.



Nothing in life is to be feared; it is only to be understood.
User currently offlineWarRI1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 9040 posts, RR: 10
Reply 24, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 3570 times:

Quoting ScarletHarlot (Reply 21):
You guys are very lucky to be so close to your families. Some of us have families that let us down time and time again. I have no desire to interact closely with my blood family. I have no problem living 2000 miles away from them. Fortunately, I have built a wonderful set of friends here who are my family now. They do not let me down.

I cannot argue with that, if you have no family to rely on, you have no choice but to rely on friends. I can only judge by my experiance. I was lucky, I guess.



It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
25 airportugal310 : To be even more specific, perhaps, one must learn to rely on oneself as well. That is part of this thing we call "life", I suppose. Self-reliance is
26 Post contains images ShyFlyer : Ya gotta do what ya gotta do. As an only child myself, I saw first hand how difficult it was for the maternal-unit to see "her baby" leave the nest. I
27 KLM672 : Hello and thank you for all the replies. The funny thing about it is that when my mom was young (around 17) she packed up her things and moved from Ge
28 ScarletHarlot : Yes, this is the bottom line, that you must be able to take care of yourself, since that may be all you have to rely on when times get tough.
29 YVRLTN : I moved from London (UK) to Vancouver when I moved out of my parents house. I was 24. They were sad to see me go but they knew it was the best choice
30 Airxliban : KLM672, Step 1: don't be upset or frustrated with your mother. Very few of us on here know what it is like to be a parent and even fewer know what it
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