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Quitting Your Job - On A Bad Or Good Note?  
User currently offlineAA7295 From Australia, joined Aug 2007, 622 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2825 times:

Hi All,

I realize this is an obvious answer – most of you will say it will be best to leave on a positive note.

However I have something that I call integrity (and I’m not saying any of you don’t). But I don’t believe it is right to leave and say “thanks you for this experience” and all that rubbish sucking up to management and HR. I realize I’m ahead of myself.

Long story short for the past 5 years, I have worked for company (a very large notable company – however the affiliate in Australia is quite small with only 60 people in the office). I wanted to remain in this company as I was passionate about it and essentially wanted a long career with them. At the beginning of this year we had a restructure and I had all my managers change etc. My current GM has never had experience in the field I work in. Yes the company put a GM as the head of a division in which she has had no prior working experience. In addition, my direct report is not from Australia and doesn’t speak English well.

This is all fine, except, me being the junior, I am sick of teaching my GM procedures, methodologies and strategies, and sick of teaching my direct report the English language and how things are done in Australia. So despite all of this, things aren’t getting done, because of the poor management structure, and I am being blamed. My GM who is single and has no life expects me to stay in the office until at least 8pm. I am just above entry-level and my salary certainly does not reflect the hours I do in addition to the extra tasks I have to do. I am a very persistent and conscientious person, but they are taking advantage of me and not rewarding my career with my extra efforts – I recently heard my contract will not be renewed when it expires.

The good news is, I am very good at my job and have been headhunted to take up a similar role in a completely different industry and I don’t intend on returning back to this one.

Let me be clear, I don’t want to swear and use profanity when I leave, but I don’t want to cloak my reasons and I want them to know how I really feel without drawing emotion into the situation.


Has anyone got resignation stories similar to what I will hopefully do? Was there any consequences etc?


Also, adding to the situation, I am thinking of resigning outside of my notice period. I have 4 weeks holiday banked up and I have to give 4 weeks leave. I am thinking of just leaving an forgoing my 4 weeks holiday just to get out? Thoughts?


Thanks all for your help and advice!

AA7295

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinepliersinsight From United States of America, joined May 2008, 494 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2808 times:

First, you get on the PA and swear at people, then grab a few brews on the drink cart, trigger the emergency slide...oh wait, sorry that one was done already.

I'd never burn a bridge, but I am also older, lazier and self employed so ANYONE out there is a potential customer. That being said, here are some funny ideas you'd regret doing:

1. Send and e-mail blast company wide that details your gripes. However, do it with style, maybe in the form of a goodbye letter with lines such as "Oh, and GM, I am going to miss our late hours at the office where I helped you learn how to do your job and comprehend diffcult concepts like the English language. You've come a long way, and I know you'll keep reaching for the stars without me. Be sure to ask Joe or Ed for help if you need help because they have lots of free time when they aren't discussing youtube videos at the watercooler."

2. Send a cake to the office with "The top the reasons why I left" on it in icing.

3. Post on the airliners.net message board. Oh, never mind.

4. Make a fake photo scrapbook to leave behind at your desk that describes all the things that annoyed you about the place.

5. Hide dead fish and cheese all over the place before you leave. Air ducts, behind desks, you get the idea.


User currently offlinelewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3636 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2797 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
Long story short for the past 5 years, I have worked for company (a very large notable company – however the affiliate in Australia is quite small with only 60 people in the office). I wanted to remain in this company as I was passionate about it and essentially wanted a long career with them. At the beginning of this year we had a restructure and I had all my managers change etc. My current GM has never had experience in the field I work in. Yes the company put a GM as the head of a division in which she has had no prior working experience. In addition, my direct report is not from Australia and doesn’t speak English well.

This is all fine, except, me being the junior, I am sick of teaching my GM procedures, methodologies and strategies, and sick of teaching my direct report the English language and how things are done in Australia. So despite all of this, things aren’t getting done, because of the poor management structure, and I am being blamed. My GM who is single and has no life expects me to stay in the office until at least 8pm. I am just above entry-level and my salary certainly does not reflect the hours I do in addition to the extra tasks I have to do. I am a very persistent and conscientious person, but they are taking advantage of me and not rewarding my career with my extra efforts – I recently heard my contract will not be renewed when it expires.

Take out the English problems with your direct report, I was exactly in the same situation. Was in a low position, lost my manager and ended up bearing all the workload because I was the only one left in the new team with prior experience with my clients. My salary did not reflect the long hours/weekends that I had to work and in addition to all that, everyone above me never had something good to say to me or for me, even when I made my dept an extra 100,000EUR by getting involved in a project abroad, something that nobody in the company had ever done before.

If it wasn't for my international transfer to the US working out fine, I would have quit. The things I would have said kept playing in my head like a long tape. Before leaving, I made sure that I made my point to the HR and the Partner of my department about how I felt. No profanity, no tone, just an honest discussion about feeling overworked, underpaid and without any recognition whatsoever. I am not sure how they felt about it but since I wasn't speaking in a bad way I didn't care really. If they want to correct some things in the department they can use my feedback, even if they feel it is harsh, if not, they can keep doing things the way they were and lose more people with knowledge and experience. I say go for it, as long as you keep your cool and don't come out too agressive about it.

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
Also, adding to the situation, I am thinking of resigning outside of my notice period. I have 4 weeks holiday banked up and I have to give 4 weeks leave. I am thinking of just leaving an forgoing my 4 weeks holiday just to get out? Thoughts?

Before taking my transfer I had 6 weeks paid leave accumulated after 2 years with no time off whatsoever. I took it because I would just have to sit around and get some rest while being paid. If your four weeks are paid leave, why not take it and spend it relaxing before starting your new job or spend it looking at all your options - while getting paid at the same time!


User currently offlinelewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3636 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2783 times:

Quoting pliersinsight (Reply 1):
1. Send and e-mail blast company wide that details your gripes. However, do it with style, maybe in the form of a goodbye letter with lines such as "Oh, and GM, I am going to miss our late hours at the office where I helped you learn how to do your job and comprehend diffcult concepts like the English language. You've come a long way, and I know you'll keep reaching for the stars without me. Be sure to ask Joe or Ed for help if you need help because they have lots of free time when they aren't discussing youtube videos at the watercooler."

2. Send a cake to the office with "The top the reasons why I left" on it in icing.

3. Post on the airliners.net message board. Oh, never mind.

4. Make a fake photo scrapbook to leave behind at your desk that describes all the things that annoyed you about the place.

5. Hide dead fish and cheese all over the place before you leave. Air ducts, behind desks, you get the idea.

These also sound like good options!


User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 4, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2769 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):

Let me be clear, I don’t want to swear and use profanity when I leave, but I don’t want to cloak my reasons and I want them to know how I really feel without drawing emotion into the situation.

Don't burn your bridges. Leave in a professional, courteous manner - so that if you should need to, you might have a chance to return. And take your paid leave (Rec leave?) - don't give that away, that's your entitlement.

In private sector, your leave and other entitlements don't follow you from one place to the next (unlike in the public sector) - so that's an even bigger reason to take your leave. You need some time as well to unwind and clear your head too.


User currently offlinegemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5664 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2749 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
I am thinking of just leaving an forgoing my 4 weeks holiday just to get out?

Check with your local state industrial relations agency. I don't think they can withhold leave payments due to lack of notice, no matter what a contract says.

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlineTOMMY767 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 6584 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2741 times:

I'm actually leaving my work to go to the east coast and I'll be sending out a company wide e-mail. I don't think many will care but it's a good gesture.


"Folks that's the news and I'm outta here!" -- Dennis Miller
User currently offlinephotopilot From Canada, joined Jul 2002, 2744 posts, RR: 18
Reply 7, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2741 times:

Look, here's the problem. Even if you're going to a different industry they'll still want references and will check. So the question you have to ask yourself is..... How will the manner of my leaving affect what they will say about me later?

If you'd only worked there a year or so, that's a manageable time period to "hide" on a resume. But you can't hide 5 years of your life. So the odds are very strong any new company will check references and contact your former employer. Unless you can find a way to not put them on your resume and still account for the 5 year gap.

Also, if you leave on professional terms, write your own letter of reference, outlining your history with the company, some of the highlights of your accomplishments, etc. Ask your boss to sign this. Many bosses seeing that you have already written one will sign simply because they're too lazy to start and write one from scratch. Unless of course you've lied and totally misrepresented what you say in the letter. So be honest, but shape the letter to your best advantage.

And lastly, and meaning no slight, but how can you be at a company for 5 years and still be just above entry level and not a great salary. It sounds like you were in a rut anyway, so leaving might be a good thing. But what you do when you leave is try to have another job lined up prior to quitting. So make some plans for your job search. First off, don't even think of applying for another job unless it pays 10-20% MORE than what you were making. Also look for a higher classification position that's a better job. That's how you climb up the ladder. I changed jobs 4 or 5 times in a 12 year period and each time increased my responsibility, salary, benefits etc, and now am MUCH better off than if I'd stayed at the same company for that period of time.

Good luck.


User currently offlineSteeler83 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 9209 posts, RR: 20
Reply 8, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2713 times:

Quoting photopilot (Reply 7):

I think this piece of advise, along with those other similar pieces, are the best ones on here. Give notice of your leaving anyway. That will show your current employer (as well as future ones) that you meant well and are courteous to your employer. If you just up and leave without proper notice, you're really putting your employer and co-workers in a very hard place. They'll be one man short and will have a very hard time maintaining a high productivity rate. If you give someone notice (2 weeks is usually sufficient enough), they can announce an immediate opening, interview new applicants and perhaps hire your replacement right on the spot to make for a rather easy transition between a new employee and a soon-to-be former one.

Besides, when going for new jobs down the line, I believe one of the questions they ask a reference is if they were given proper notice prior to departure as well as why that person left. I don't think anyone will take too kindly to a response like, "Who, Scott? Hell, right when we were trying to finalize everything with the Johnson account, he decided enough was enough and did not tell anyone he was leaving. Because of that, we're now falling behind, and our productivity is way down," etc...



Do not bring stranger girt into your room. The stranger girt is dangerous, it will hurt your life.
User currently offlineiairallie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2616 times:

Quoting AA7295 (Thread starter):
I don’t want to cloak my reasons and I want them to know how I really feel without drawing emotion into the situation.

What is the point? You are leaving. This has nothing to do with integrity. It has to do with ego and maturity. Are you mature enought to leave without having to get the kind of instant satisfaction one gets from telling your employer exactly how you feel in detail? It would be best to just leave it alone and move on with your life.


User currently offlineoffloaded From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 886 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2602 times:

Leave on a good note, regardless as to whatever internal issues are. It should become apparent soon enough that your GM is out of his/her depth when you are gone, but that won't be your problem. I received an email a while ago from someone that left a company we use, and he was very unhappy about it. Rather than making the company look bad, it actually made him sound whiney and unprofessional. I understood his point, but he didn't word it well.


To no one will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice - Magna Carta, 1215
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 11, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2577 times:

Much sensible advice about not giving in to temptation, but in case you do give way:

Quoting pliersinsight (Reply 1):
5. Hide dead fish and cheese all over the place before you leave. Air ducts, behind desks, you get the idea.

don't forget the green prawns, they are a treat after a week or so.

Hope you are more happy in yr new position.


User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2554 times:

I know where you are coming from, but resist the temptation to broadside. If you should be asked to state your reasons for leaving you might add some constructive ideas but I wouldn't make a big deal of it unless they were looking for a way to persuade you to stay.

Never, ever leave the company on a bad note. You never know when it may come back to bite you in the bum. No company that is recruiting appreciates a potential employee bad-mouthing another employer. It smacks of disloyalty and suggests sour grapes. Many companies will follow up references and a company that you given a two-finger salute to is hardly likely to do you any favours. It may be that the law says you can not give a bad reference, but replies like, "I prefer not to answer that," can be far more damaging. And who knows, in five years time you might be looking for a another position only to find that the HR manager from your old place now works at the firm where you are applying for a job.

If you have the chance to get a definite job offer before resigning your present post, do so. But still give the required notice. You'll be respected all the more for it by your new employer.

Best of luck for the future.


User currently offlineswissy From Switzerland, joined Jan 2005, 1734 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2527 times:

Leave always in the best note despite the facts reflects different... never burn a bridge, as you state your "local" office is small means not much if you work/worked for a multi national company, always look at the big picture , have gone down a similar road and went from finance/airline industry to H2O, was chased by headhunters but I found something completely different on my own, still have very good contacts to the old industry and they would take me back in a instant...

Cheerios,


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7703 posts, RR: 21
Reply 14, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2512 times:
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What you should do is:

1) Tell your boss in no uncertain terms you don't need his job.
2) Call him 'bongo head'.
3) Ride out of the building while playing his head like a bongo.
4) As you ride of the premises over the bridge that leads you off the site, toss a lit match over your shoulder so that it burns.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineiairallie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2453 times:

Quoting Quokka (Reply 12):
If you should be asked to state your reasons for leaving you might add some constructive ideas but I wouldn't make a big deal of it unless they were looking for a way to persuade you to stay.

I'd weigh this one really carefully. A lot of employers conduct exit interviews. Unless you really honestly think that the feedback you are tempted to offer will lead to positive change after you go(answer is almost always not %^&! likely) keep it to yourself and give the honest but neutral reasons why you are leaving. I think Quokka mentioned it but there is too much risk of making youself look bad like an immature whiner and no real benefit to gain by giving a more complete answer. .


User currently offlineF9Animal From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 5053 posts, RR: 28
Reply 16, posted (3 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2398 times:

LMAO! I am not the one to ask how to leave a job. I would set her up for failure. However, if you are leaving for sure, take the time off!


I Am A Different Animal!!
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