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Want To Try Out Ubuntu/Linux. Experiences?  
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 2211 times:

Alright so strictly just out of curiosity (yes, my computer is perfectly fine, runs very fast, is safe, and I love Windows 7) I was thinking about trying out Linux, or more specifically, Ubuntu. I'm currently formatting a spare hard drive just for installing the OS, in dual boot of course. I'm doing it because mostly I'm bored, but it sounds like it would be a good OS for the other 11 year old computer here at home, and eventually I would like to run one of the more advanced distros, like Backtrack, on a netbook/laptop. I also downloaded Knoppix just in case it may come in handy in an emergency.

Anyways, just want to see what's all the hype about.

I've read up a lot on it but still feel kinda lost and want feedback from real people, not journalists. Have any of you given up Windows/OSX completely and used a Linux distro exclusively? How easy is it to master/learn the command line prompts? The fact that it is open source and that you can modify the OS as you wish down to the kernel intrigues me and I wouldn't mind fiddling with that.

Any feedback appreciated.

26 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3525 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2190 times:

Fiddle away but don't quit the Windows. For background, I have been using PCs since DOS 3. I am running Ubuntu on 3 comps at home for the last year or so because I'm too cheap to buy Windows 7 and have been waiting for the 3 licenses for $150 again (its back now). As an example of real world experience, I just spent over a week trying to get a tv tuner to work. Actually the tv tuner worksfine, the driver is included, but most all of the tv software is flaky. In fact, I have never used such a bunch of flaky software in my life as what I find in the Linux world. That sometimes includes ubuntu itself too. I have a tuner program working now but it loses sound after a period of time. Meanwhile, in my dual boot XP, the tv tuner software works right out of the box, reliably.

It got so bad this week, I was downloading an upgraded tuner that required a special, fairly obscure program to unpack (cmake). Problem was, it took 2 hours of searching to figure out the command lines for it and then the guy who wrote the upgraded program forgot one line in the file to make cmake work. What a colossal clusterf*ck the Linux world is. Much of it I believe is because of too much fragmentation and too much old information out on the internet that does not pertain, such as bad commands.

I could go on and on, I'll remember more later, its been quite a ride. I hope to buy Windows 7 this week. Some things are ok about Ubuntu, foremost, the price.


User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2183 times:

Interesting account Mham001. Funny cuz I got that same feeling from the whole Linux community as well. This is my first official post in Ubuntu. Hard to give a first impression yet other than it's very.... different. I want to say it's a bit slower than Win7, but maybe because I chose the ext4 file system, also from what I read Ubuntu isn't too good on 64 bit systems. Anyways, I got plenty to explore so I may write back with more thoughts.

User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3525 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2177 times:

First thing I do is install Ubuntu Tweak. It lets you put buttons in more familiar places.

BTW, don't believe the fanboys who claim Ubuntu or Linux can't be broken, I can make it crash in 10 minutes. In fact I had a terminal crash with a command line this week.

[Edited 2010-10-25 19:44:19]

User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2170 times:

Quoting mham001 (Reply 3):

BTW, don't believe the fanboys who claim Ubuntu or Linux can't be broken, I can make it crash in 10 minutes. In fact I had a terminal crash with a command line this week.

Oh I take that with a grain of salt alright. Only thing worse than a Linux fanboy is a Mac fanboy.  


Well after poking around for over 3 hours I still felt very lost. Just installing things seems waaaay too complicated, I'm not used to all this unpacking, compiling, writing etc etc crap and having to use command lines for doing every single step.


User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3525 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2163 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 4):

Well after poking around for over 3 hours I still felt very lost. Just installing things seems waaaay too complicated, I'm not used to all this unpacking, compiling, writing etc etc crap and having to use command lines for doing every single step.

But the Linux guys will tell you frequently that the setup is all very logical, the rest of the world just doesn't understand and maybe you just aren't smart enough.

They seriously crack me up sometimes. they tell you how easy it is, then commence with 30 lines of gibberish commands.


User currently offlinenighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5123 posts, RR: 34
Reply 6, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2117 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 4):
Well after poking around for over 3 hours I still felt very lost. Just installing things seems waaaay too complicated, I'm not used to all this unpacking, compiling, writing etc etc crap and having to use command lines for doing every single step.

90% of software you'll need can be installed through the Software Center, or whatever its called these days. All you need to do is search in there for it, and click install. Far easier than on windows. The remaining 9% can be downloaded as an RPM / DEB, which is a case of double clicking and it installs. Occasionally you will find the 1% that needs to be installed the way you have done so.

One of the biggest mistakes made by new users is to search for software on the itnernet. Dont. Search through the software center, followed secondly by using the command line apt-get. Only if they cant find what you need should you be downloading software from websites.

I was using Ubuntu on my laptop exclusively, but I just got a new one with Windows 7, and have not yet installed Ubuntu. (I dont know if I will or not, im still undecided)



That'll teach you
User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 5959 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2108 times:

The best thing to do to install Ubuntu alongside Vista/7, is unpower the Vista/7 drive, and plug the new hard drive into that cable. Install Ubuntu, then hook everything back up to what it was prior, and make the Ubuntu drive the slave. Then, use EasyBCD to setup the Windows bootloader. Viola!


Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlinegolfradio From Canada, joined Jun 2009, 744 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2080 times:

Quoting mham001 (Reply 3):
BTW, don't believe the fanboys who claim Ubuntu or Linux can't be broken, I can make it crash in 10 minutes. In fact I had a terminal crash with a command line this week.


cd /
sudo rm -rf *


User currently offlineALTF4 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1206 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2073 times:

Linux is great for servers, I'd take a Linux (preferrably CentOS) over a Windows server any day, unless we're talking about a domain enviornment.

As for desktop use... its like the people who use used oil from restaraunts to fuel their cars. Sounds like a really good idea, seems to work at first, probably will continue to work, but... you just never quite know. In the end, though, all the work gets to you and you end up buying gasoline again... or in this case, Windows.



The above post is my opinion. Don't like it? Don't read it.
User currently offlinerichm From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 798 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2060 times:

I use Ubuntu on my home PC all the time now. I love it because it's fast, secure, stable And FREE! You don't need to worry about installing antivirus software on it, and there's very little point in de-fragmenting due to its solid ext4 file system. Not only that, it also has a huge opensource community which imo is a great thing.

I must admit, it took me a long time to make the switch to Linux. Back in the day, I kept switching from XP to Red Hat Linux but always found myself baffled and shortly went back to XP, where I felt more at home. (XP Home huh?) However, my interest prevented me from giving up and eventually, I was able to make the switch entirely. Linux has come a long way since those days (Fedora & Ubuntu for example) and it's now much more intuitive. On desktop distributions, terminal is more of an accessory these days rather than a primary tool!

I'm going to have to drop a bombshell here. In all honesty though, If you want to get used to Linux, the easiest way imo is to stop using Windows, at least in the meantime. You're familiar with Windows, so naturally you may prefer it. People often prefer what they're familiar with. However, when you get used to using Linux, your perception may change. Your perception is unlikely to change if you keep going back to Windows. I'd say give it at least a few weeks and then decide what's best for you. The reason it took me so long to make the switch to Linux, was because I kept going back to Windows every time I felt baffled or confused.

Of course, there's some things you can't do on Linux. For instance, there's some games and applications that simply won't run on Linux. Want to play that new Medal of Honor game? Want to play Flight Simulator X? Want to use the native WLM client? Forget it on Linux. However, there's often alternative programs that will do pretty much the same thing. For instance, I use "Pidgin" to connect to MSN, Yahoo and AIM. While on the subject of software compatibility, it should be pointed out that there is a "compatibility layer" known as WINE. In concept, it's similar to an emulator (Except it stands for "Wine Is Not an Emulator!") It allows you to run many Windows applications on Linux. That said, it's a bit of a hit or miss situation. Though, I use it to play WoW on Ubuntu and I actually get better FPS than I do on Windows! (Strange, huh?)

Software is becoming more and more web based. It won't be long until we're all using Office programs via our browsers instead of running it directly from our hard drives. That's the way computer applications seems to be heading in general. This has the potential to solve or overcome many compatibility issues in the future.

As for which OS is better overall, I think it's largely down to preference. They both have their own pros and cons. I think Windows 7 is a great improvement over its predecessor. However, the main reason I still use Linux is because I'm paranoid about security. It does pretty much everything I need it to do and it will perform well on older hardware. Last but by no means least, I don't have to pay for it. So, why not?

Quoting mham001 (Reply 3):
BTW, don't believe the fanboys who claim Ubuntu or Linux can't be broken, I can make it crash in 10 minutes. In fact I had a terminal crash with a command line this week.

Yup, but 90% of the time I bet you have to type the almighty "sudo" in order to do it.    But yeah, I agree. No operating system is bullet proof.

Rich

[Edited 2010-10-26 09:49:45]

User currently onlinecsavel From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1362 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2024 times:

When my Windoze laptop died I tried Ubuntu on an loder laptop and I freakin' love it.

The biggest problem is that programs that I need to use for work (The Adobe Creative Suite) aren't available in in Linux. You can install something called Wine which will run Windows apps, albeit slowly.

Like everything it isn't a panacea and it isn't perfect, and Fly2HMO you're right Linux fanboys can be even more insufferable than Mactards, but it is free, a lot of the Open Source stuff (Open Office, e.g.) work just as well as Microsoft Office.

Few hints Firefox on Ubuntu isn't great. Firefox in general jumped the shark. Download chrome.

biggest hassle is sometimes USB drivers. My ubuntu laptop is older so doesn't have Wifi, the Belkin USB wifi adaptor is beautiful - as a piece of art. It sure doesn't work as an adapter. Another problem, given the DIY is that documentation is fragmented and contradictory.

That being said, what have you got to lose?



I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
User currently offlineAM744 From Mexico, joined Jun 2001, 1770 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2005 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Thread starter):
Have any of you given up Windows/OSX completely and used a Linux distro exclusively?

Tried for years, showstopper being peripherals and their Windows-only drivers. I'm not talking about esoteric devices, but printers and scanners. Also, too many poorly developed websites demand M$ proprietary constructs (ActiveX, wmv media files, etc, which are cumbersome to run within Linux). Diversity is a double edged sword too. Different distros use different approaches, specially for configuration and system chores. You'll be fine if you only use Ubuntu, but you'll have to deal with subtle variations if you decide to use other Unix-like systems. On the other hand, there is now some decent software and portability for word processors, spreadsheets, etc, which were a big hurdle in the past.

Quoting Fly2HMO (Thread starter):
How easy is it to master/learn the command line prompts?

Simple commands have the complexity level of a Windows command prompt, although they are more consistent, intuitive and powerful once you get a grasp of the philosophy, specially piping. There are several tutorials floating around in the web. Advanced features go as far and complex as you want them to be for Unix shells are languages and there are some commands like awk and sed that are languages themselves. Unix shells and advanced commands use regular expressions. Very useful and powerful for dealing with plain text, but this is yet another 'language' to be learned.

Generally speaking I've found Linux to be faster than Windows, up to Vista. Haven't tried Windows 7. The mere fact that you don't have to run antivirus bloatware all the time helps A LOT, specially on older hardware.


User currently offlineTLG From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 368 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1970 times:

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 6):
90% of software you'll need can be installed through the Software Center, or whatever its called these days. All you need to do is search in there for it, and click install. Far easier than on windows.

Now THAT does not make sense!

-TLG


User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1958 times:

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 6):


One of the biggest mistakes made by new users is to search for software on the itnernet. Dont. Search through the software center, followed secondly by using the command line apt-get. Only if they cant find what you need should you be downloading software from websites.

Yeah, I slowly learned that the hard way. I think I'm more or less comfortable with the repositories and the synaptic package thingy.

Quoting ALTF4 (Reply 9):


As for desktop use... its like the people who use used oil from restaraunts to fuel their cars. Sounds like a really good idea, seems to work at first, probably will continue to work, but... you just never quite know. In the end, though, all the work gets to you and you end up buying gasoline again... or in this case, Windows.

Well said.

Quoting richm (Reply 10):

As for which OS is better overall, I think it's largely down to preference. They both have their own pros and cons. I think Windows 7 is a great improvement over its predecessor. However, the main reason I still use Linux is because I'm paranoid about security. It does pretty much everything I need it to do and it will perform well on older hardware. Last but by no means least, I don't have to pay for it. So, why not?

Good write up. So far I'm trying to avoid windows as much as possible, though I am typing from Win 7 right now, I did spend all afternoon playing around with Ubuntu in Live USB mode. Was working ok until it froze 3 hours in. Not surprised as running it live isn't really a stable environment I guess.

Quoting AM744 (Reply 12):

Simple commands have the complexity level of a Windows command prompt, although they are more consistent, intuitive and powerful once you get a grasp of the philosophy, specially piping. There are several tutorials floating around in the web. Advanced features go as far and complex as you want them to be for Unix shells are languages and there are some commands like awk and sed that are languages themselves. Unix shells and advanced commands use regular expressions. Very useful and powerful for dealing with plain text, but this is yet another 'language' to be learned.

Looks like I got a lot of reading ahead of me lol

Quoting TLG (Reply 13):
Now THAT does not make sense!

I still think its much easier to google whatever you need, download the .exe, install it, and be done with it. Maybe it's just habit, but I find that much easier than searching and updating repositories, adding new ones, compiling, etc etc


User currently offlineGo3Team From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3267 posts, RR: 16
Reply 15, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 1954 times:

Quoting TLG (Reply 13):
Now THAT does not make sense!

Sure it does - Install via Synaptic. Makes installing thing much easier. Don't have to go hunting for dependencies as it installs whatever is needed as well.



Yay Pudding!
User currently offlinecaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 16, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 1937 times:

I use Ubuntu on my PC as well. I dunno, it seems to be just fine to me. i personally dislike Windows, but that is just me. On a linux machine you can expect some compatibility issues, lack of support for some devices but all in all it works just fine. You have to read up a bit, yoy have to run some stuff through the terminal, it´s a bit of work at times. Once you get everything up and running, your day to day activities just go by easier. I love the high level of customisation. I love the integration of music and social connectivity in the system. I love the organisation, I just that bit more productive on Ubuntu. I love the ability to tweak the life out of it. I love not having to run an antivirus in the background.

Start off with dualboot or on a second machine, give it a chance, try to tweak it to your taste, and then conclude if it is for you or not.

The only think I use Windows for is my magic jack which I have on my XP virtual machine. I will take this moment to boast my cool looking Ubuntu desktop. http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/7600/screenshotrgs.png



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineALTF4 From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 1206 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1917 times:

Quoting Go3Team (Reply 15):
Don't have to go hunting for dependencies as it installs whatever is needed as well.

Unless, of course, the dependancy (or maybe not the exact version, down to the fourth number in the third decimal grouping, like 4.3.2338) is not in the repository. Thats when the real fun begins...

Quoting captaink (Reply 16):
I will take this moment to boast my cool looking Ubuntu desktop.

Very spiffy  

What is that fake dock at the top? I know a few distros come with something of that nature, but I don't think Ubuntu does.



The above post is my opinion. Don't like it? Don't read it.
User currently offlinecaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 18, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1910 times:

Quoting ALTF4 (Reply 17):
What is that fake dock at the top? I know a few distros come with something of that nature, but I don't think Ubuntu does.

HAHA hey it is not a fake dock, it is a dock (even though Apple came out with the idea, I had one in Windows even) It is the Avant Window Navigator (AWN), I used it replace my panels, which I dislike, I have my most use apps available there, along with access to my terminal, and Ubuntu menu, along with my notification and indicators. It is a great desktop manager, and with it you really need nothing else.



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1838 times:

Been using it 5 days pretty much non-stop so far. I'm getting the hang of it, I think. However, it has completely locked up on me many times already, many more times than Windows 7 ever has in fact. And even more frequently I've had lock ups of the task bar/menu bar whatever its called in Linux, but already running programs still work. I guess it's because I got the 64bit version which from what I read isn't known for stability. And I'm still not liking the cumbersome installation system at all. Took me the better part of an hour to set up several simple programs that in windows would've taken me seconds. As for speed, it actually seems a tiny bit slower than Win7, an almost negligible difference. And the fact that it has to ask me for a password for every single installation/modification and none of the methods to deactivate it seem to work, makes things even worse. Hell, I thought it was supposed to be less annoying than Windows, guess not  

Also I think it's naive to completely dismiss the possibility of getting a virus in Linux, or any other OS for that matter. Sure, Unix-like viruses may be rare, but they're out there. And yes, you might be able to let your guard down a bit compared to Windows in this regard, but otherwise, I don't feel to comfortable doing so. Also, looks like sharing my printer is impossible while I'm running Ubuntu, and every time my mom wants to print form our other old XP machine I have to restart and boot to Windows.

So many flaws, yet I can't stop using it for some odd reason...   

[Edited 2010-10-29 10:33:03]

User currently offlinerichm From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 798 posts, RR: 7
Reply 20, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1826 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 19):
It has completely locked up on me many times already

That's strange, I've never had that problem. Run the update manager (System > Administration > Update manager) and download all the latest updates. Also check for proprietary drivers. (System > Administration > Additional drivers)

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 19):
I got the 64bit version which from what I read isn't known for stability.

I have virtually no problems with the 64-bit version. The only problem I have is with one application which is compiled to run on a 32-bit version. It's missing some 64-bit libraries, so some features don't work properly. However, I can't blame Ubuntu for the actions of third party developers.


Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 19):
Took me the better part of an hour to set up several simple programs that in windows would've taken me seconds.

When you get used to it, it really shouldn't take that long, even when installing software the "long" way. Sure, it's different, but it's can actually be quicker. (For instance, when downloading and installing software via Synaptic) Many software developers have now created .deb packages for easy and quick installation. Don't blame Ubuntu just because some third party open source developers expect us to do it the long way.

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 19):
And the fact that it has to ask me for a password for every single installation/modification and none of the methods to deactivate it seem to work, makes things even worse.
Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 19):
Also I think it's naive to completely dismiss the possibility of getting a virus in Linux, or any other OS for that matter. Sure, Unix-like viruses may be rare, but they're out there. And yes, you might be able to let your guard down a bit compared to Windows in this regard, but otherwise, I don't feel to comfortable doing so. Also, looks like sharing my printer is impossible while I'm running Ubuntu, and every time my mom wants to print form our other old XP machine I have to restart and boot to Windows.

Well it's strange that you complain about its enhanced security features, yet go on to say that you don't feel comfortable letting your guard down. When it asks you for your password, it is because it's effectively using root (administrator) rights. It's a good security feature because it will only allow you to make significant modification to the system if the system believes you're authorised to do so. If you really don't like it, you can disable it. Or you can simply use the root account instead. I don't recommend doing either though.

Sure, Linux is not 100% immune. For instance, Rootkits can be installed on Linux machines. However, it is not usually a straight forward task. You need access to the system in order to infect it. It is most commonly done through vulnerable third party server software. I think it's safe to say that it's not a major concern for Linux desktop users. Like I said, no OS is bullet proof. I think it should be pointed out that in general, (and in the context of desktop security) attackers tend to go for the easier and larger targets unless of course, you have some enemies with very good Linux computer skills! Even then, it would probably be very difficult considering you're probably not running any publicly accessible services. (Apache, FTP, MySQL etc)

As for your printer, it should be possible to share it. AFAIK, they use the same protocol. I wouldn't do it that way though. I'd set up a separate wifi enabled print server for the printer. Many newer printers come with one built in.

Rich

[Edited 2010-10-29 12:09:50]

User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1805 times:

Quoting richm (Reply 20):

That's strange, I've never had that problem. Run the update manager (System > Administration > Update manager) and download all the latest updates. Also check for proprietary drivers. (System > Administration > Additional drivers)

Done that daily. No new updates since I installed it. The only proprietary that I needed to install were for the video cards.

Quoting richm (Reply 20):

Well it's strange that you complain about its enhanced security features, yet go on to say that you don't feel comfortable letting your guard down. When it asks you for your password, it is because it's effectively using root (administrator) rights. It's a good security feature because it will only allow you to make significant modification to the system if the system believes you're authorised to do so. If you really don't like it, you can disable it. Or you can simply use the root account instead. I don't recommend doing either though.

I like having absolute control over my system, and not having to be questioned about it every time I have to do something.. I configured my user as an admin. And I've searched for workarounds but can't be bothered to do it at the moment.


User currently offlinerichm From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 798 posts, RR: 7
Reply 22, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1802 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 21):
I like having absolute control over my system, and not having to be questioned about it every time I have to do something.. I configured my user as an admin. And I've searched for workarounds but can't be bothered to do it at the moment.

Well Linux does give you superior control over the system compared to many other operating systems. That is one reason why many people choose Linux. (Though, personally, I found Windows 7 perfectly adequate in this respect for my needs.) The security feature in question is not a door that you can't open, it's just making sure that you're authorised to do the requested actions. You only have to use it when you're making significant changes.

If you really want to disable it, you may want to check this external link:
http://www.ubuntugeek.com/how-to-dis...le-password-prompts-in-ubuntu.html

Even though I also find the feature a little annoying it times, I wouldn't disable it myself.

Rich

[Edited 2010-10-29 12:48:39]

User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 1789 times:

Quoting richm (Reply 22):

If you really want to disable it, you may want to check this external link:
http://www.ubuntugeek.com/how-to-dis...le-password-prompts-in-ubuntu.html

Even though I also find the feature a little annoying it times, I wouldn't disable it myself.

Ah, that seems simple enough to do. Thanks for the link.

Reading from all the comments it really sounds like the password deal is overhyped. It's not my main OS anyways and I'm the only person that has access to my own computer. A password won't make a difference for a virus/malware infection anyways, in any OS. I hate being nagged, specially by a machine.


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined exactly 13 years ago today! , 21386 posts, RR: 54
Reply 24, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1782 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 23):
Quoting richm (Reply 22):

If you really want to disable it, you may want to check this external link:
http://www.ubuntugeek.com/how-to-dis...le-password-prompts-in-ubuntu.html

Even though I also find the feature a little annoying it times, I wouldn't disable it myself.

Ah, that seems simple enough to do. Thanks for the link.

That is an extremely bad idea on any system that is for more than just nonessential playing around (and even there it is inadvisable). If you have any kind of personal data on your system do not do this!

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 23):
Reading from all the comments it really sounds like the password deal is overhyped. It's not my main OS anyways and I'm the only person that has access to my own computer. A password won't make a difference for a virus/malware infection anyways, in any OS.

That is comnpletely wrong.

Privilege escalation is not trivial to do on a properly updated Unix system – unless the user has disabled the password prompt on sudo (if that is even enabled in the first place).

With the prompt disabled, there isn't even any privilege escalation to do – any exploit pretty much is on root level at its every whim.

Linux exploits are usually targeted at server machines, but if you leave the front door wide open and the safe unlocked as well, I wouldn't be surprised if somebody took you up on your liberal offering.

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 23):
I hate being nagged, specially by a machine.

Sure, but that attitude is one of the primary enablers of the malware industry.


25 Post contains links PhilGil : I've been a happy Linux user for about 1 1/2 years, and I see no reason to return to Windows. Started with Ubuntu, and now I run Debian on my home and
26 mham001 : Printers are the big bugaboo. I have a printer with a linux driver and between 3 computers it works a little bit (differently)on 2 wirelessly. Not at
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