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The Pedantic Thread  
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19722 posts, RR: 58
Posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 4328 times:

The purpose of this thread is to be pedants.

Go ahead, corect someone's speeling.

Point out that their using the wrong homonym.

Call them on their choice to boldly split an infinitive!

And definitely don't let anyone get away with starting a sentence with a conjunction.

Or... let them get away with finding new and interesting prepositions to end sentences with.

Have fun!

95 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4315 times:

One of my favourites is mixing the third person singular with the third person plural possessive pronoun due to PC. For example, the customer has lost their ticket. "The customer has" is singular but "their" is plural. Because we are no longer allowed to use "his" or "her" we mangle the language.

User currently offlineAirstud From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2670 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4305 times:

I don't think that's about political correctness, I think that's just one of the problems posed by our language's lack of a third-person singular gender neutral pronoun for non-inanimates.

English also lacks a second-person plural pronoun (this function used to be served by "you" whilst "thou" was singular, "thou" got phased out, don't ask moi why...). So currently (yes Doc, that's how I started this sentence) we are faced with appalling constructs like "Can I get youguys's fax number?"

This is why I heartily endorse use of "y'all." It really does serve an important grammatical function.

Also Doc, FWIW, the Oxford English guide officially blesses use of split infinitives.



Pancakes are delicious.
User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 4280 times:

Quoting Airstud (Reply 2):
I don't think that's about political correctness, I think that's just one of the problems posed by our language's lack of a third-person singular gender neutral pronoun for non-inanimates.


But why do we need to be gender neutral? PC says that we should but is inconsistent. If we wish to be gender neutral there is no reason why we can't use "its" in place of "their". That would appear more logical to me but I appreciate that language and logic are not the same.  


User currently offlineMBMBOS From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2597 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4221 times:

It's drivel, dammit! Not dribble.

I've seen so many A-netters use dribble to call an argument silly or meaningless I'm beginning to wonder if they're having bathroom problems.


User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11658 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4159 times:

The one thing I do not like about the English language is we have to say "yous" or "y'all" if I am speaking to a group but do not want to be included in said group. I run into this all the time in other threads. In Spanish, it is classified as "ustedes."

Dangling participles and infinitives also bother me....



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6216 posts, RR: 30
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4153 times:
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Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
Call them on their choice to boldly split an infinitive!

And what is that?


User currently offlineWestWing From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2134 posts, RR: 7
Reply 7, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4142 times:

This is the sort of arrant thread up with which we ought not put.  

I still find the the use of "was like" for "said" irritating. (e.g., She was like "OMG are you for real?" ).



The best time to plant a tree is 40 years ago. The second best time is today.
User currently offlinefridgmus From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 1442 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4137 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting DocLightning (Thread starter):
The purpose of this thread is to be pedants.

Go ahead, corect someone's speeling.

Point out that their using the wrong homonym.

Call them on their choice to boldly split an infinitive!

And definitely don't let anyone get away with starting a sentence with a conjunction.

Or... let them get away with finding new and interesting prepositions to end sentences with.

Doc, I think the world of you, but, what the hell are you talking about? Maybe a translation for those of us who don't have some advanced education?   

"Y'all be sweet now, y'hear!"



The Lockheed Super Constellation, the REAL Queen of the Skies!
User currently offlineN801NW From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 744 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4125 times:

The use of "payed" for "paid" has been irking me.

User currently offlinesan747 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 4943 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 4090 times:

I find this whole thread shallow and pedantic!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QguWdSsI8S8



Scotty doesn't know...
User currently offlineIH8BY From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 1142 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4065 times:

Quoting Airstud (Reply 2):
Also Doc, FWIW, the Oxford English guide officially blesses use of split infinitives.

It remains better to avoid it if at all possible. I would only split an infinitive if I thought it would prevent a more serious error of grammar or style. It particularly annoys me when people split the infinitive with many words ("to even more seriously wind me up").

Also, * is an asterisk, not an asterix. Asterix is a French cartoon character!



Have you ever felt like you could float into the sky / like the laws of physics simply don't apply?
User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3305 posts, RR: 13
Reply 12, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4043 times:
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I've been waiting for a thread like this for a long, long, long, long time. Gives me a chance to rip on all the people who grind my gears with their awful English usage here. (And yes, I mean native English speakers, as I very often see these from them more than anyone else).

Here are the things I hate most...

1) "Could of" or "Should of.": It's COULD'VE or COULD HAVE, people!!!! I can't tell you how often I see this and it drives me absolutely bonkers. It just makes you seem uneducated (and me seem pedantic, which is the theme of this thread, after all!)

2) "For all intensive purposes.": It's "For all INTENTS AND PURPOSES." A purpose cannot be "intensive".

3) "I could care less.": It's "I COULDN'T care less!" If you could care less, that means you DO care a little bit. So you're saying the complete opposite of what you mean!

4) "Your", "You're": Please, please, please just think about this if you write it. It's one of the easiest things in English. And it makes you seem, again, uneducated if you can't do it right.

I'm sure I'll think of many more as I read these forums (and, funnily enough, this thread)...

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
User currently offlineJetsGo From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 3083 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 4034 times:

I hate when I see people, primarily from England, using the work "whilst." Drives me nuts!


Marine Corps Aviation, The Last To Let You Down!
User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3305 posts, RR: 13
Reply 14, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 4023 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting JetsGo (Reply 13):
I hate when I see people, primarily from England, using the work "whilst." Drives me nuts!

Why? It's an accepted form of the word, and has the same meaning. It's just as common, and it's the American language that has diverged from it. It's actually the more formal literary version. That's like a British person saying he or she (happy, Quokka??) doesn't like Americans using "truck" instead of "lorry". It's just that dialect's version of the word.

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
User currently offlineTheRedBaron From Mexico, joined Mar 2005, 2216 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 4022 times:



I think the photo speaks for itself...



The best seat in a Plane is the Jumpseat.
User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10034 posts, RR: 26
Reply 16, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 4008 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

These are the two mistakes that bother me the most on A.net:

Here, here! Doc has made grammatical errors a mute point!

Quoting san747 (Reply 10):
I find this whole thread shallow and pedantic!

  

Hmmm, yes, shallow and pedantic!

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 12):
"For all intensive purposes.": It's "For all INTENTS AND PURPOSES." A purpose cannot be "intensive".

That one is freaking hilarious. I don't know from where people got "intensive purposes."

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 12):
1) "Could of" or "Should of."

Ugh.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 12):
3) "I could care less."

That one doesn't bother me at all. One could say that it is sarcastic.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineYellowstone From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3071 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 4004 times:

Quoting AR385 (Reply 6):
And what is that?

English infinitives consist of two words: "to run," "to be," "to write," etc. It's considered by many to be improper grammar to place other words between "to" and the verb, which is said to split the infinitive.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 12):
3) "I could care less.": It's "I COULDN'T care less!" If you could care less, that means you DO care a little bit. So you're saying the complete opposite of what you mean!

English comedian David Mitchell has a nice rant about this, pointing out that "I could care less" only means that you don't care not at all. It allows for all possible levels of caring besides the one you actually meant.

The other one he points out: it's "hold the fort," not "hold down the fort." What is it, some magical inflatable hover-fort that's going to drift away if there isn't someone there to weight it down?

Quoting WestWing (Reply 7):
I still find the the use of "was like" for "said" irritating. (e.g., She was like "OMG are you for real?" ).

Ah, but "was like" and "said" have different connotations. "Said" is the baseline, vanilla-flavored version of the word. It signals merely that the speaker is going to recount the words someone said, with no indication as to the style or manner of that repetition. "Was like" implies that the speaker is going to act out what the speaker, literally, "was like," complete with mannerisms, accent, inflection, etc.



Hydrogen is an odorless, colorless gas which, given enough time, turns into people.
User currently offlineHywel From Uganda, joined Apr 2008, 802 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 4001 times:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-11893462

Discuss!


User currently offlineseb146 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 11658 posts, RR: 15
Reply 19, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3980 times:

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 12):
"Could of" or "Should of.":

And, let's not forget "A whole nother." When did "nother" become a word?

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 12):
"Your", "You're":

Their, there, they're....

Also, what about the use of contractions and apostrophies? Or the word "nuh-uh" instead of "no."



Life in the wall is a drag.
User currently offlineKent350787 From Australia, joined May 2008, 965 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3970 times:

Not that it happens too often here, but the use of "phase" rather than "faze" as in " I was really fazed by that" or "that doesn't faze me". Perhaps it's not misused here as most of us know what phases are?

User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8707 posts, RR: 42
Reply 21, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3952 times:

Quoting seb146 (Reply 19):
apostrophies

What's an apostrophy? Something you win after winning something else?   



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineBAViscount From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 2338 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3937 times:

Oooh I could go on for hours, but it's late and I have to pack for a business trip, so:

"A lot" not "Alot". Allot is a word, alot is not.

"The proof is in the pudding". My blood boils whenever I hear people say that. It's "The proof of the pudding is in the eating", which makes so much more sense!



Ladies & gentlemen this is Captain Tobias Wilcock welcoming you aboard Coconut Airways flight 372 to Bridgetown Barb
User currently offlineJetsGo From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 3083 posts, RR: 5
Reply 23, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3898 times:

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 14):

That's all fine and dandy, however it's not used out here and therefore I'm not used to it. It's like the great soda/pop debate. And btw, it's SODA.



Marine Corps Aviation, The Last To Let You Down!
User currently offlineEI320 From Ireland, joined Dec 2007, 1437 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3887 times:

Quoting Airstud (Reply 2):
English also lacks a second-person plural pronoun (this function used to be served by "you" whilst "thou" was singular, "thou" got phased out, don't ask moi why...). So currently (yes Doc, that's how I started this sentence) we are faced with appalling constructs like "Can I get youguys's fax number?"
Quoting seb146 (Reply 5):
The one thing I do not like about the English language is we have to say "yous" or "y'all" if I am speaking to a group but do not want to be included in said group. I run into this all the time in other threads. In Spanish, it is classified as "ustedes."

In Ireland, we simply use "Ye" (pronounced "Yee").

Eg. Why are ye all posting on a.net?

Much easier than "yous" or "y'all" or whatever else is used.

The obvious problem that has resulted from it's widespread oral usage in Ireland is that many people are now using it as part the written language (unaware of the fact that it's incorrect).

[Edited 2010-12-12 17:02:30]

25 bookishaviator : The abuse and misuse of apostrophes drives me mad, although not nearly as much as Textese... For example: C u l8er / 2nite / 2moro Is it really all th
26 Post contains images Quokka : Yes, thank you. It's not so hard after all. This could be a hangover from the 80 character limit on SMS. Messages containing more than 80 characters
27 n229nw : WHEN PEOPLE SAY "X AND I" INSTEAD OF "X AND ME" when X and Me is actually correct: Examples: "A picture of my wife and I" "Just between you and I" Mos
28 CXB77L : Says it all, really. This would be my list, too. I refuse to reply to text messages written like this. When the writer calls up to ask why I haven't
29 bookishaviator : I also find the use of "off of" quite irksome. For example, why say "Freddy jumped off of the ladder" when "Freddy jumped off the ladder" is perfectly
30 HSVXJ : I grew up all over the US but spent twenty years in Alabama, so I'm used to different dialects. In fact, although I teach English you might hear me sa
31 HSVXJ : The reason this is used is not always due to PC. Before coming out of the closet, a lot of gay people get to be really good at being non-gender speci
32 MasterBean : I was going to post this in the snow snow snow thread but then realised it was quite pedantic so here we go. Road tax, it doesn't exist hasn't for abo
33 Post contains images Quokka : As we are being pedantic, that's "bloody Scots to go to uni free of charge." It occured to me that you could have posted this in the other thread on
34 WrenchBender : The plural of "Aircraft" is "Aircraft" not "Aircrafts". You are on "Short Final" not "Short Finals". Your aircraft is parked in a "Hangar" not a "Hang
35 IMissPiedmont : Also, when someone says "Me and my friend....." Do you ever want to slap someone upside the head?
36 AKiss20 : Love the show Topgear but what irks me to no end is when they say "RPMs" and "Torques" RPM = RevolutionS per Minute, aka the plural is already there!!
37 ronglimeng : I don't think I am being pedantic here by suggesting that none of the examples here are truly examples of pedantry, i.e. the narrow and often ostentat
38 Post contains images seb146 : It also bothers me that texting language has creeped it's way into everyday language. "omg becky wtf was she thinkin with that shirt here is the pic n
39 Post contains images n229nw : Technically, of course, it doesn't matter where in the sentence the part comes. It is about whether the pronoun is the subject or object of the phras
40 ANITIX87 : I agree about the RPMs. But the use of "Torques" is intended satirically, I believe. Just like when Jeremy Clarkson once said, "This car has 700 torq
41 Post contains images vikkyvik : In much the same vein, it irks me when people say "ATM Machine." Glad you clarified that an Automated Teller Machine is a Machine! What about the spe
42 Yellowstone : Relative pronouns are another good trap for that. For example, a lot of people might try to show off their mastery of who vs. whom with a sentence li
43 JBirdAV8r : This is, like, totally such an awesome thread; like, it's totally awesome. Anytime I see/hear a restaurant advertising a dish served "with au jus" it
44 mirrodie : He's a pedantic, pontificating, pretentious bastard, a belligerent old fart, a worthless steaming pile of cow dung, figuratively speaking.
45 Post contains images n229nw : Exactly...but that is because so many teachers actually don't understand the grammar they are supposedly teaching. They are just teaching kids to "so
46 AKiss20 : I agree sometimes it is used satirically but he often will use the word when simply describing stats of the car "With 500 BHP, producing 250 torques"
47 IMissPiedmont : No, you never say "me and....." anything, correct grammatical structure is to put yourself in a subordinate position. The correct saying is "That is
48 Post contains links vikkyvik : To be fair, that is the actual name of the tar pits: http://www.tarpits.org/ So it's not really the common Los Angeleno's fault.
49 Post contains links san747 : Let Robert Stack clarify this for us: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4XCZfkGF8k
50 n229nw : OK, there are two separate issues here. One is which pronoun to use and the other is whether you can put yourself first in order. I disagree that "me
51 CXB77L : Ordinarily, I would agree, but too often when I've tried to correct people's usage of English, I get labelled a pedant. I've never understood why peo
52 Post contains images DocLightning : If your participles dangle too much, you should discuss the problem with your doctor. There are medications for that. The infinitive is the "base" fo
53 ANITIX87 : Oh, I realize it's accepted vernacular, it just drives me insane. Many idioms and vernacular phrases in English are ridiculous, to begin with: 1) "I
54 Post contains images DocLightning : I hear it's a short trip. The end of that phrase is: "And made/got four." Make sense now? Is not a word. It is either "irrespective" or "regardless."
55 ANITIX87 : I know the end of the phrase, but my point was that you're given TWO pieces of information. If you said, "I put one and one together, and made/got tw
56 Yellowstone : Snopes says that "bought the farm" was predated by a good century or so by the phrase "to buy it," meaning to die. So "farm" is probably just slang f
57 Post contains images Kent350787 : Unless they used extremely large values of two? My other pet hate, against which I struggle in vain, is kids "versing" each other. I always wonder wh
58 Quokka : Perhaps it is derived from "versus" as in the wonderfully idiomatic "me versus you" that I remember from my schooldays. It would be said by one boy t
59 Quokka : The use of the expression "My bad" in place of "My mistake". Usually the word "bad" is used as an adjective. Examples are: bad behaviour, bad breath S
60 ANITIX87 : Also an annoying accepted vernacular. We also say, "I like to drive fast," which is incorrect. We should be saying, "I like to drive quickly." But th
61 474218 : For years I all the technical responses I wrote were sent by "Telex" and "apostrophes" were not used. So you never used conjunctions, "don't was alwa
62 Post contains images NAV20 : A little surprised at that, Doc - given your profession. I guess I'm showing my age, but when I was a kid antibiotics were not in general use, flyspr
63 clemsonaj : The three that bother me the most are site, cite, and sight. I recently sat through a presentation by a researcher who was trying to gain some 'incite
64 474218 : Then there is the President of the United States that doesn't know the difference between: "Corps and Corpse"!
65 Quokka : Now there is a thing. Should that be " the President of the United States that ..." or the the President of the United States who..."?
66 seb146 : I am surprised no one has mentioned "verbing" words. That is: taking nouns and turning them into verbs. Like school or text or card. This irked Calvin
67 RussianJet : My main problem is the fact that pointing out the incorrect usage of words such as 'your' and 'you're' and 'there' and 'their' is even viewed as being
68 Post contains images n229nw : Hmmm....the whole point is that style isn't a matter of "correct" or "incorrect" but a matter of preference. It can perhaps be "bad," but not "wrong.
69 seb146 : People saying "ATM machine" and "hot water heater" both bother me as well. Can one really heat hot water? Isn't an automatic teller machine machine re
70 Post contains images Quokka : along with forgetting their PIN number. Here in Australia, businesses have an Australian Business Number or ABN. A question asked frequently is "What
71 kanban : How about cases where brand names are used instead of the generic when the item is not that brand.. such as Kleenex for tissue, Hoover for vacuum (bot
72 Post contains links and images CXB77L : 'Google', 'Wiki', 'Twitter' and 'Facebook' have also become (or are becoming) verbs. I admit to using the first two, but not the latter two (yet). I
73 Yellowstone : Aww, but "Twitter" is so fun to mutate! The site is "Twitter," when you post there you "Tweet," and one who uses it is a "Twit." Or a "Twat," I'm fle
74 kanban : so a message and reply is "twit" for twat"
75 Quokka : In the UK a twit is a person lacking intelligence or common sense and that sometimes is appropriate to those who tweet. But "twat" is usually reserve
76 Post contains images DocLightning : I'm sure you are.
77 NAV20 : Pet hate of mine is how so many TV and radio newsreaders, referring to things like stock market prices, ALL say things like 'BHP shares rose by point-
78 ANITIX87 : The "most correct" term would eliminate the single percent altogether, and be "...point five percent" or "one half percent". TIS
79 Quokka : Another daft form of expression commonly used in advertising is "five times less". So if brand A has 10gm of fat, brand B has "five times less" or min
80 Post contains images NAV20 : Have to be even MORE pedantic, I'm afraid, ANITIX87. Agree that 'point-five per cent' would be correct, but I think it could lead to 'panic buying or
81 Zentraedi : I hate how people keep pronouncing "bruschetta" as if it were a German word. It's supposed to have a K sound in the middle, not SH.
82 varigb707 : How about "would of", "could of" and/or "should of" . That bothers me...
83 ANITIX87 : Someone decided to post without reading the thread. See my Reply # 12. It's one of the things that bothers me most. TIS
84 RussianJet : Have we had 'pacific' instead of 'specific'? That one makes me truly angry.
85 moose135 : "Very unique..." Unique means "one of a kind", something can't be "very unique".
86 474218 : My old boss would interrupt someone in mid sentence if they used the word: "irregardless" and say the word is "regardless"!
87 Post contains images CXB77L : I would normally say "zero point five percent" in that case. While I would agree that if someone said "point five percent" some people might miss the
88 DocLightning : The sad part is I can totally read it. For those of you who can't (you need some familiarity with American "Ebonics"), 954-4495.
89 Post contains images Quokka : So now we know how you spend your spare time.
90 AR385 : FRom another thread title: "More Anti Palin hate from the media" How does that work? Anti-hate for Palin? Wouldn´t that be the media throwing Anti-ha
91 jet-lagged : Good thread! Righto. (Does that spelling pass mustard?) And like . Rio Grande (Spanish) River = Big River River . Tamagawa (Japanese) River = Tama Riv
92 Yellowstone : No, it's not. The "X" in Xmas isn't really a Latin x, it's a Greek "chi," the first letter in Christ. Christians have been using "chi" to represent C
93 DocLightning : But "irregardless" is a double negative. It basically means: "regardful." Or something. I just started a sentence with a conjunction. Someone spank m
94 Post contains images AR385 : Río Grande? What Río Grande? It doesn´t exist. It´s Río Bravo
95 DocLightning : As long as we're talking about pedantry, I hate it when Spanish names are deliberately mispronounced. Except I'm totally inconsistent about it. I have
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