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Estonia: 17th Euro Country  
User currently offlineHELyes From Finland, joined Oct 2010, 943 posts, RR: 1
Posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3295 times:

BBC:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-12098513

"Estonia has become the 17th member of the eurozone - the first ex-Soviet state to adopt the EU single currency. Two other ex-Communist countries - Slovenia and Slovakia - are already in the eurozone.

Despite market pressure on the eurozone and the Greek and Irish bail-outs this year, polls suggested most Estonians wanted the euro."

Welcome to the Eurozone Estonia! The common currency will bring close neighbours Estonia and Finland even more closer. Now it's not so lonely anymore here in up north  





[Edited 2010-12-31 18:41:12]

90 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDunaA320 From UK - England, joined Feb 2009, 614 posts, RR: 8
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3281 times:

I guess my 160 Kroons I have are no good anymore!

User currently offlineAirstud From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2673 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3266 times:

I am disappointed. I know knothing about macro economics but shmartpeople I know I have railed against the common currency; also it was more fun when each country had its own name for its currency!!   This is why I also miss the Ecuadorian sucre and the Argentinian austral.


Pancakes are delicious.
User currently offlineEaa3 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1015 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3260 times:

Quoting Airstud (Reply 2):
I am disappointed. I know knothing about macro economics but shmartpeople I know I have railed against the common currency; also it was more fun when each country had its own name for its currency!! This is why I also miss the Ecuadorian sucre and the Argentinian austral.

Estonia has had a fixed exchange rate with the Euro and Deutsche Mark for a long time so this is really not much of a change for the economy.

Congratulations to Estonia.

As for economic criticism of the Euro people tend to mix things together. The problems in Europe are due to sovereign debt levels and the fact that governments with the Euro can no longer print money and are therefore reliant on the market for funding. But mostly government debt levels just can't be blamed on the Euro. Additionally the argument that all the countries in Europe could devalue their currency to increase their competitiveness and fix their problems just doesn't make sense because if all the countries devalue then they all cancel each other out.


User currently offlineHELyes From Finland, joined Oct 2010, 943 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3255 times:

Quoting DunaA320 (Reply 1):
I guess my 160 Kroons I have are no good anymore!

Good news, your 160 Kroons (10 Euros) is valid money still  

*Until 14 January 2011, it will be possible to use both euros and kroons in making cash payments.
*Until 31 December 2011, banknotes and cents will be exchanged for euros in the bank offices in Estonia.
*The Bank of Estonia will exchange kroons and cents for euros without a specified term, service fee and according to the official exchange rate.

http://euro.eesti.ee/EU/Prod/Euroveeb/Main_Page/index.jsp


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7704 posts, RR: 21
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3227 times:
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The 'always accurate' Daily Mail had a ridiculous article plastered on its site describing how Estonia was ".....gearing up to join the European Union". The fact it has been in the EU since 2004 seemed to escape those clowns entirely.   

They have fixed it now.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27034 posts, RR: 58
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3204 times:

Very boring design! Im sure they have more things in Estonia to put on their coins rather than just one design. Shame really.

User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10901 posts, RR: 37
Reply 7, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3149 times:

All I can say is good luck to Estonia with the Euro.

i would not be surprised if people there see some price hykes to levels higher than normal inflation rates in the time to come.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineoldeuropean From Germany, joined May 2005, 2091 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3131 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 5):
The 'always accurate' Daily Mail had a ridiculous article plastered on its site describing how Estonia was ".....gearing up to join the European Union". The fact it has been in the EU since 2004 seemed to escape those clowns entirely.

So, do we wonder why so many Brits are against the Euro?
...
ehmmm ... no!   

Welcome Estonia to the Euro.



Wer nichts weiss muss alles glauben
User currently offlineGST From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2008, 934 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 3098 times:

Quoting oldeuropean (Reply 8):

So, do we wonder why so many Brits are against the Euro?

There have been a lot of lies and misinformation spread about the Euro over here, for little more benefit than nostalgia about the pound. For the record I have wanted the Euro for years. We would have been far better placed recession-wise if we were in the Euro beforehand, even if the government is less able to micromanage the economy as a result.


User currently offlineOzGlobal From France, joined Nov 2004, 2721 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3095 times:

Quoting GST (Reply 9):
Quoting oldeuropean (Reply 8):

So, do we wonder why so many Brits are against the Euro?

There have been a lot of lies and misinformation spread about the Euro over here, for little more benefit than nostalgia about the pound. For the record I have wanted the Euro for years. We would have been far better placed recession-wise if we were in the Euro beforehand, even if the government is less able to micromanage the economy as a result.

So, do we wonder why so many Brits are against the Euro? Look know further than who owns most of your media, his ideology and the rest follows. Murdoch hates the EU, even more the Euro and does a good job of maintaining a compliant British cheer squad accordingly. You can make fun of those Americans watching Fox 'News', but the UK has a dozen local versions under Murdoch's agenda.



When all's said and done, there'll be more said than done.
User currently offlineEaa3 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1015 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3070 times:

Quoting GST (Reply 9):
There have been a lot of lies and misinformation spread about the Euro over here, for little more benefit than nostalgia about the pound. For the record I have wanted the Euro for years. We would have been far better placed recession-wise if we were in the Euro beforehand, even if the government is less able to micromanage the economy as a result.

The attitude today is that any economic problem in a country with the euro must be the euros fault, as if another currency would litterally fix all their problems. Truth is that another currency would fix very little but cause other problems not seen before.

It's just not true.


User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 3065 times:

Welcome Estonia to the Euro Zone.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 7):
see some price hikes to levels higher than normal inflation rates

Given that the Esti kroon has been linked to the Euro for some time, unless collectively shopkeepers deliberately "round" the wrong way, there should not be any problems.

Quoting OzGlobal (Reply 10):
Murdoch hates the EU, even more the Euro

I doubt whether Britain's opposition (as opposed to some readers of some news papers) has much to do with Rupert Murdoch. I also suspect that RM himself couldn't care much one way or the other - he is in business to make money and money is money, whether it is US dollars, Australian dollars, Euro or pound Stirling despite any fluctuations in value between them.

The same can not be said for the City - i.e. London based financial markets. At the moment the pound has the status of one of the world's reserve currencies and the Stock Exchange in London is one of the the world's leading markets. Whatever advantages the City may enjoy would be lost if it became just another trading centre within the Euro Zone. Given that England ceased to be the factory of the world a few decades ago, this is something the UK Government is unable to ignore.

To the average Brittish citizen, it probably doesn't make a lot of difference when they fly to Majorca (or wherever is fashionable and affordable this year) for their summer holiday.

[Edited 2011-01-01 05:52:40]

User currently offlineoldeuropean From Germany, joined May 2005, 2091 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 3056 times:

Quoting Eaa3 (Reply 11):
The attitude today is that any economic problem in a country with the euro must be the euros fault, as if another currency would litterally fix all their problems.

Yep, this also must be the reason why the British economy seems to be doing so well.         

I wonder how any media from the Murdoch empire can be taken seriously.  

[Edited 2011-01-01 05:48:44]


Wer nichts weiss muss alles glauben
User currently offlineMortyman From Norway, joined Aug 2006, 3956 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 3015 times:

I'm happy with nthe Norwegian Kroner ( NOK )

User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10901 posts, RR: 37
Reply 15, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2998 times:

Quoting Mortyman (Reply 14):
I'm happy with nthe Norwegian Kroner ( NOK )

Good currency, yes. The same with the Swiss Franc.
I like Swiss Francs. I'd much rather have that than Euros if I was free to choose.

If the Euro loses ground, think how many countries will see the consequences.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineAustrianZRH From Austria, joined Aug 2007, 1386 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2996 times:

Quoting Quokka (Reply 12):
Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 7):
see some price hikes to levels higher than normal inflation rates

Given that the Esti kroon has been linked to the Euro for some time, unless collectively shopkeepers deliberately "round" the wrong way, there should not be any problems.

Seeing where Mme Concorde is from, her fears have some base. In France, there were some very strong price hikes after the Euro introduction. Funnily enough, round my place in Austria and Southern Germany, I have seen no such effect, so it's definitely not the Euro's fault.

Quoting Eaa3 (Reply 11):
The attitude today is that any economic problem in a country with the euro must be the euros fault, as if another currency would litterally fix all their problems. Truth is that another currency would fix very little but cause other problems not seen before.

Thank you very much for this comment, so finally I'm not the only one saying that any more...



WARNING! The post above should be taken with a grain of salt! Furthermore, it may be slightly biased towards A.
User currently offlineU2380 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2010, 325 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2990 times:

Quoting OzGlobal (Reply 10):
So, do we wonder why so many Brits are against the Euro? Look know further than who owns most of your media, his ideology and the rest follows

Yeah that's completely the reason  
Because here in Britian we all have absolutely no brain and 'lap up' all the 'rubbish' that the media spews out.

No.

Actually it's because the EU undermines the British Authorities, and implement rules that are hugely unpopular with the public, for example:

"Thousands of convicted UK prisoners are to get the right to vote after the European Court of Human Rights (EHCR) ruled that the present ban was unlawful."

All this, whilst the two main countries in the EU do as they please, avoiding any rules that they do not feel are relevant to them..

If by some miracle one day a British Government had a referendum on the over-glorified trade block is the EU, then we would see what the British Public really feel.

[Edited 2011-01-01 08:29:01]

User currently offlinegkirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24938 posts, RR: 56
Reply 18, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2981 times:

   Estonia.

Quoting U2380 (Reply 17):
If by some miracle one day a British Government had a referendum on the over-glorified trade block is the EU, then we would see what the British Public really feel.

Which would be a big, fat no. The EU is as corrupt an organisation as you'll find



When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10901 posts, RR: 37
Reply 19, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2978 times:

Quoting AustrianZRH (Reply 16):
Seeing where Mme Concorde is from, her fears have some base. In France, there were some very strong price hikes after the Euro introduction.

Tell me about it. Food prices are outrageous.

I wanted to buy me some jumbo shrimp for New Year's but seeing the price I had to give up.
Smaller size shrimp was no better and it is the same for most qualiity foods.

Here again I am only talking about basic good qualify foods, eggs, cheese, fresh fish, quality chocolate, flour, sugar, non-industrial breads and pastries etc. Don't tell me about organic stuff. Purely insane.

Even the junk stuff isn't cheap.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7444 posts, RR: 5
Reply 20, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2956 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 19):
Tell me about it. Food prices are outrageous.

What are you complaining about, food prices in France are dirt cheap compared to Norway. Here in Norway we pay a fortune for poor quality food that the French wouldn't even feed to their pigs.


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10901 posts, RR: 37
Reply 21, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2941 times:

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 20):
Here in Norway we pay a fortune for poor quality food that the French wouldn't even feed to their pigs.

The people's income level and the state of the economy for the two countries are at opposite ends. Also Norway is not part of the Euro zone or even a member of the E.U.

If you look at the OECD indicators (per capita purchasing power indexes) for Norway and France -for 2009- they are quite different. France ranks very far behind.

http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=PPPGDP

Norway is far superior in all cases. Official statistics are talking by themselves.
I would swap for the Norwegians purchasing power immediately if I could.



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineKiwiRob From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 7444 posts, RR: 5
Reply 22, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2931 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 21):
Also Norway is not part of the Euro zone or even a member of the E.U.

And I wish it was, one day Norwegins will come to their sences and join. The really daft thing is even thought they are not part of the EU they follow all it rules and directives yet they have no say in making them.

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 21):
I would swap for the Norwegians purchasing power immediately if I could.

Wait until you need to buy a house or a car and you'll wish you were back in France. Or if you take a trip to a Norwegian supermarket you'll be astonished by the lack of choice, poor quality and expense.


User currently offlineQuokka From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2931 times:

Quoting U2380 (Reply 17):
a referendum on the over-glorified trade block is the EU, then we would see what the British Public really feel.

How such a vote would go would surely depend on the issues at the time. How many British travelers, for example, are vehemently opposed to the EU regulations on compensation for disruption to travel?

The way the question is framed may affect the result. A blanket "are you in favour of Britain disappearing up the arsehole of the EU?" would no doubt result in a resounding "No."

"Are you prepared to give up your rights that you presently enjoy for more restricted rights under UK law?" might have a different result.

How many travelers disrupted by the closure of airspace following the volcanic explosion in Iceland volunteered to give up the rights under EU law in exchange for the treatment that carriers like FR were offering?

How people "really feel" depends on what's happening at the time and when the wind changes, so do the feelings.


User currently offlineAustrianZRH From Austria, joined Aug 2007, 1386 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (3 years 9 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2895 times:

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 22):
And I wish it was, one day Norwegins will come to their sences and join. The really daft thing is even thought they are not part of the EU they follow all it rules and directives yet they have no say in making them.

Tell me about it. I live in Switzerland by now. 25 CHF/kg for turkey breast is the usual price, even on the low side, meaning 16,60 to 20 EUR/kg depending on the exchange rate. Over the holidays I visited my parents back in Austria, 10 km for the border and I bought 1,5 kg turkey breast for 12 EUR, i.e., 8 EUR/kg. Believe me, Mme Concorde, the salaries are not SO much higher here...



WARNING! The post above should be taken with a grain of salt! Furthermore, it may be slightly biased towards A.
25 NoUFO : I didn't know Britain banned convicted felons from voting. I thought Britain had a modern prison system.
26 U2380 : Depends on how you define modern... But the EU should not be defining it for us.
27 Post contains images RussianJet : Are you seriously suggesting that allowing criminals the vote is the only or most important measure of whether a prison system is 'modern'? What tosh
28 Asturias : Well good luck Estonia! The Euro is certainly more comfortable to use in the common market and more convenient. asturias
29 Asturias : Norway is a part of the EEA, which makes it a second tier EU member. Norway already complies with about 75% of all EU legislation, is part of the Sch
30 NoUFO : Where did I say "only" or "most important"? Absolutely not. The European Union is more than just "economics". Fortunately. Otherwise the UK (or Hunga
31 Asturias : The EHCR has nothing to do with the EU. Just for the benefit of the discussion, I'm sure you and others knew it, but simply forgot about it and mixed
32 U2380 : That's the problem, the EU should not be anything more than economics. It should be a trade block, it should not be something that interferes with na
33 JRadier : I can see both sides of the argument, but why shouldn't the EU be? For all intents and purposes, the UK choose to be part of the EU and helped shape
34 RussianJet : You stated the problem and a conclusion. You clearly implied it was the reason for your statement, but I won't get bogged down in pathetic semantical
35 U2380 : Well this is my opinion only obviously but.. I feel that the EU member countries are too different for the EU to become a super state, and that if th
36 NoUFO : I merely stated the obvious (or what should be obvious): Depriving convinced felons should be no element of a modern prison system. No more no less.
37 Post contains images aloges : God, I wish the UK just left the EU in a jingoistic huff and let the rest of us get on with reality. The British reactions on a.net to anything saying
38 OzGlobal : You can resolve your doubt by doing a search of his media coverage of some key events and with the help of hindsight see the propaganda machine and i
39 U2380 : Several recent governments/leaders in their election campaigns have said that they will offer a referendum on the EU: Tony Blair: 2004 Gordon Brown:
40 MillwallSean : I would prefer the UK to vote on the EU as a whole. Simple Yes or No. The outcome would in my humble opinion be a clear No. Then lets have the economi
41 KiwiRob : Which I why I don't get why Norwegians have a problem being members, at the moment they are members with no say in the rules which they have to follo
42 JRadier : And this is a EU problem how? To me it sounds like it ought to be time to find some trustworthy politicians (although that kind of is a contradictio
43 U2380 : Actually that was a reply to this comment.. I'm going to wrap up my end of the discussion now anyway. It's my opinion that the EU is fine when just a
44 Mortyman : We don't like the idea of being run entirely from Brussels... Norway is also a country with a very small population. We won't get alot of votes in th
45 Post contains links and images MadameConcorde : I never liked the Euro. I was never favourable to it. I was forced into it just like many others. What good is the Euro ? Look at Greece, Ireland... N
46 aloges : Are you for real? Even the motto is "United in Diversity"! There is certainly a lot more common ground between e.g. Portugal and Spain than there is
47 RussianJet : Actually massive numbers of people disagree with you there, certainly among the British public. To call this opinion of yours 'obvious' is somewhat c
48 aloges : If it was just about a pick-and-mix for the UK, I wouldn't have a problem. The reason why the UK stands out is the Maggie Thatcher rebate, the ceasel
49 NoUFO : Accordingly it would be "conceited" to criticize Hungary for its new and thoroughly problematic media law because many people there might actually we
50 Post contains images aloges : A trade bloc needs streamlined rules and regulations for the trade between its members, otherwise it isn't a trade bloc. Obviously, trade includes no
51 RussianJet : ....which I haven't any knowledge of and haven't commented on at all, but doubtless has little to do with your assumptions about British prisons.....
52 aloges : What exactly do you mean by this? I've hardly ever seen anyone glorify the EU. Enthusiasm, yes, and also undeserved praise, but in my experience, the
53 RussianJet : I simply mean that myths are propogated both ways, i.e. that various misconceptions about the EU are propogated in the UK and also that various misco
54 einsteinboricua : Oh come on. Some of you are very pessimists. Since the currency debuted five nations have joined. I have not yet heard negative views from them. Congr
55 NoUFO : I understand in 2011 the Estonian Kroon will or can be used alongside with the Euro. This will probably keep shop owners from raising prices above th
56 Post contains images aloges : Thanks for proving me wrong, RussianJet!
57 Post contains images RussianJet : Ha! Glad to be of service!
58 Post contains images aloges : Oh, now I see. I thought you were speaking of "positive prejudices", if such a thing exists, against the EU. I do take your point, in agreement with
59 KiwiRob : Norway wouldn't be run from Brussels anymore than it already is, plus you would be able to send Norwegians to the European Parliament. The idea that
60 Klaus : Norway would have to share some of its oil revenue in the common budget. That is most probably the primary reason why they've abstained so far. How w
61 einsteinboricua : Not to mention their fishing quotas will be affected. Isolation...Norway would be surrounded by the EU, though that hasn't stopped Switzerland and Li
62 Post contains images Klaus : Isolation matters primarily when you're intensely involved in foreign trade with goods and services. Norway doesn't really have that to a large extent
63 einsteinboricua : Yes...that too.
64 Post contains images speedygonzales : I'm looking forward to the day we'll see Euro coins with Haakon VIII's portrait Unfortunately, I don't think we'll see it in Harald's lifetime
65 airtrainer : A bit off topic, but what about taking the opportunity for a meet in Estonia this summer ?
66 ME AVN FAN : Doe those smarties also rail against the common currency of the USA ? If they prefer the monetary chaos of pre-Euro times they ought to have a seriou
67 lewis : Congratulations to Estonia. Only time will tell if they made the right decision. Nope its not just you! People all over the EU have been vocal about o
68 Post contains images AustrianZRH : I have yet to see someone predicting the demise of the dollar because California is broke. The total deficit of the Eurozone (in % of GDP) is less th
69 Braybuddy : Congrats to Estonia, and it will be the right decision once their governmnet manage their economy responsibly and avoid the pitfalls that have surfac
70 OA260 : I hope the UK never join the Euro it doesnt need it the Pound can hold its own it has for decades and will continue to do so. I see a dual system sim
71 einsteinboricua : If there's one thing Estonia, Cyprus, Malta, Slovakia, and Slovenia, countries that joined the euro since its 1999/2002 debut, can pride themselves a
72 Post contains images oldeuropean : Just wait until their oil fields are dried out. They'll apply faster for membership than you can say "hello".
73 KiwiRob : It's not far off, 25 years tops, gas will last a lot longer but the oil will be gone. The problem in Norway is that the cost of Norwegian labor is so
74 NoUFO : Germany and Canada are low cost countries?
75 Mortyman : Recent studies on the subject of what happens with Norway when the oil dries out, shows that it won't be so bad. Atleast not these doomsday scenarios
76 Post contains images aloges : In certain areas, we have become one. Don't forget that while German wages sank or stagnated, those in other nations rose.
77 KiwiRob : Compared to Norway they are. You're forgetting that a lot of the other industries which were big employers before oil are no longer big employers and
78 NoUFO : Another proof that Einstein's Theory of Relativity is correct.
79 Post contains images oldeuropean : At least, space and time are not so different between Norway and Germany. I would be pleased to welcome Norway as the last Scandinavian country in th
80 RussianJet : Damn right. By yourself a meal and a pint in Germany or Canada, then go to Norway and do the same. You'll probably cry when you get the bill.
81 einsteinboricua : No matter how hard you try, the EU will in part be influenced by the US due to many members being members of NATO too, and Russia as well since Russi
82 Mortyman : Cost of living is about 30% higher in Norway than in the United States and 50% higher than the United Kingdom according to Wikipedia When that is sai
83 Klaus : Both Russia and the USA (and China, for that matter) are also influenced by the EU and its members – it's just the way the world works today. Absol
84 ME AVN FAN : Many of those who predict a "demise" of the Euro talk as if the old currencies were still existing somehow and simply could be drawn out of the desk,
85 RussianJet : Whereas maintaining the Euro is free?
86 ME AVN FAN : free of what ? the development of the past 20 months has shown that the heavily overvalued Euro also is subject to speculative moves. BUT the "mass"
87 RussianJet : Not free of anything, free as in cost-free. Anyway, yes I understand that the mass of the Euro aids stability etc, but at the same time it is only as
88 Post contains images ME AVN FAN : the problem for Switzerland is that the speculators try to drive up the CHF to an extent which is dangerous to the two prime money earners, the expor
89 Post contains images RussianJet : Not so comic really - in the circumstances it would see prudent to hold reserves of her larger neighbours' currency. Hedging bets is a wise plan. Rig
90 Aesma : Welcome to the Euro Estonia ! As for the design of the coins, I think Ireland also has only one design for all the coins, it must be cheaper. They can
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