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Andrew Luck Staying At Stanford  
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1569 times:

Someone needs to talk some sense into this guy. He would be the top pick in the NFL draft and probably get $50 million before he even throws a pass. For him to stay at Stanford another year is just dumb. Sure getting an education is great, but with the money he is passing up he could go to any college he wants or even start his own.

The simple fact here is that Luck has nowhere to go but down. He is just a freak injury away from never seeing most of that money. That would be the most expensive torn ACL in history. Or maybe he just has a down year. The first pick in the last draft is guaranteed $10 million more than the second pick. And the difference between the first and second (the woefully overdrafted Tim Tebow) QBs taken last year is a whopping $43.7 million. Luck might love his architecture, but seems a little weak in math.

But even if Luck plays even better and doesn't get hurt this ill advised decision could still cost him well into the eight figure range. The collective bargaining agreement in the NFL expires this spring, so a new one will have to be negotiated. (this could mean a shortened season next year, if negotiations go bad) Much criticism has been given to the NFL pay structure where rookies can be paid incredible sums of money before they do anything. Like any negotiation, both sides have certain things that they are more willing to give up. And what do a lot of people think the players are most likely to give up to owners in the negotiation? The addition of a rookie pay scale or rookie salary cap, putting an end to first picks getting up to $50,000,000 in guaranteed money. So even if Luck is picked first in the 2012 draft, he could still end up making only a fraction of what he could have made had he been picked first in 2011.

An education is good, but Stanford isn't going anywhere. Passing on money like that is just not a good idea, because there are so many things that could happen. I hope he doesn't end up regretting it, but Luck is taking a big gamble but in this case winning is nothing more than not losing.

http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=5995754


Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
26 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19727 posts, RR: 58
Reply 1, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1561 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Thread starter):
Someone needs to talk some sense into this guy.

Someone needs to talk some sense into BMI727.

As a Stanford alumnus, Andrew Luck knows exactly what I do: that there is one and only one way to become a Stanford alum: to graduate.

Not only does Andrew want his degree, but my guess is that he simply feels the same way that the overwhelming majority of Stanford students do about the school: he loves being there, he loves the place, he loves the environment, and he simply isn't ready to leave yet.

There is something magical about that school. There is something that makes it one of the happiest universities in the world. There is something intangible about a Stanford education that transcends money in any amount. It's not prestige and it's not earning potential. It's something that can't be described, but it's something that we all share. I don't hear grads from comparable institutions speaking this way about their schools.

Quoting BMI727 (Thread starter):
Passing on money like that is just not a good idea, because there are so many things that could happen.

Things like having a serious injury that can end a young player's football career? Yeah, a lot of things could happen. Andrew is taking the advice given to any kid who wants to go into pro sports: "Always have a backup plan."

The NFL isn't going anywhere. It will be there for him when he graduates.

This Stanford alum ('00, M.S. '01) is proud of Andrew Luck and I will be proud to count him among my fellow alumni when he does graduate.

Good on ya, Andrew. You made a tough decision, but you made the right decision.

Quoting BMI727 (Thread starter):

An education is good, but Stanford isn't going anywhere.

Actually, that's not quite true. Stanford has a policy called "stopping out." A student who departs the University may elect to return to complete his studies for a period of two years. After that, the student must apply again and the classes that he took previously may not count toward his degree.

So if Tiger Woods wanted to go back to Stanford and get his degree, he'd have to apply, be admitted (which isn't a trivial task, with acceptance rates less than 15%), and probably spend the entire four years.


User currently onlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21640 posts, RR: 55
Reply 2, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1549 times:

Sometimes it isn't all about the money. And it's nice to see people who get that. If he does make it to the NFL, it'll make make me pull for him that much more (though the chances of him in a Jets uniform are incredibly slim, and the Jaguars don't look too great either).

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 3, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1541 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
As a Stanford alumnus, Andrew Luck knows exactly what I do: that there is one and only one way to become a Stanford alum: to graduate.

Nothing says he can't graduate after becoming a multimillionaire. The guy is obviously smart enough to be at Stanford, they wouldn't be too stupid to not take him back a few years down the road.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
Andrew is taking the advice given to any kid who wants to go into pro sports: "Always have a backup plan."

$50,000,000 is a hell of a backup plan. That much can buy any magical education one could ask for.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
The NFL isn't going anywhere. It will be there for him when he graduates.

It absolutely is. The days of guys getting paid $50,000,000 before playing single down are numbered.

Quoting Mir (Reply 2):

Sometimes it isn't all about the money.

This is just a bad gamble. There is nothing more for Luck to gain. The only sacrifice to go to the NFL is delaying getting a degree that he wouldn't be putting to use anyway. The cost of staying in college is potentially over $40,000,000, and the gain isn't much. Isn't there a math professor anywhere on their campus that could sit him down and explain that to him?



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinefuturepilot16 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2035 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1538 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
As a Stanford alumnus, Andrew Luck knows exactly what I do: that there is one and only one way to become a Stanford alum: to graduate.

I have a lot of respect for you doc, I applied to Stanford an got rejected. Anyway, I disagree. Why is it so important to become a Stanford alumnus, when he could possibly be turning down $60 million with $40 million guaranteed. Unless that certificate from Stanford is worth $70 million dollars if he sells it. Graduating would only be a minor achievement compared to what he could accomplish in the NFL

Second - this could be the last year before a rookie salary cap is instituted, which means he will miss out on 10's of millions of dollars.

Third - (not saying anything), but what happens if he goes back to college and gets injured? At least if he's in the NFL, if things don't work out, he'll always have most of that money, and can always return to school.

fourth - (and the most possible outcome) what happens when Jim Harbaugh leaves. What if Stanford goes back into the dumps. A 4-8 Season by Stanford with Andrew Luck won't help his draft stock. Worst case scenario, he goes to some team as a second round pick, he's make $400,000 a year, other than what he could be making.

I know some people say it's not all about the money, but I think that's a load of crap. On the bright side however, Peyton Manning was in this similar situation. he was Projected to be a first overall pick going to the Jets in the 97 NFL draft, but remained at Tennessee for his senior year. He still ended up going first overall. Andrew Luck is a redshirt sophomore, but he is a Junior which makes him eligible to graduate next year in Spring 2012.



"The brave don't live forever, but the cautious don't live at all."
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19727 posts, RR: 58
Reply 5, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1524 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 3):

It absolutely is. The days of guys getting paid $50,000,000 before playing single down are numbered.

Fine. He'll get $10M. Boo hoo.

Quoting futurepilot16 (Reply 4):


Third - (not saying anything), but what happens if he goes back to college and gets injured?

He's got an backup plan as an architect. Something he won't have if he trips over the steps while moving out of his dorm and shatters his femur.


User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4491 posts, RR: 21
Reply 6, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1504 times:

The man made a very sound decision and I hope it sets precedence for other star athletes to emulate. A (free!) Stanford education is not something to take lightly. If he keeps his grades up (which he has!) he'll graduate no questions asked. This decision will be viewed positively by any of his non-NFL potential future employers.

And what makes his return to Stanford a certainty if the NFL doesn't pan out? He'll have to pay for it, and he won't have the benefit of a lot of support to help him. Am I the only one who thinks a bird in the hand is worth 40 million in the bush? He'll be fine. He'll play fine and he'll be successful--probably in the NFL too. He'll be a great role model. And most importantly, he's at peace with his own decision.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
Good on ya, Andrew. You made a tough decision, but you made the right decision.

   Hell hath frozen over, I agree with the good doctor. I say that as it's snowing like crazy and the ground is frozen solid, so there may be some truth behind that.  



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 7, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1480 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 5):
Fine. He'll get $10M. Boo hoo.

You can't seriously believe that losing $40 million means nothing.

Quoting JBirdAV8r (Reply 6):
The man made a very sound decision and I hope it sets precedence for other star athletes to emulate

It's his decision, but I hope he understands everything that could happen and all the factors that are in play.

Quoting JBirdAV8r (Reply 6):
A (free!) Stanford education is not something to take lightly.

It might be free. Or it might be the world's most expensive education. And not all of the factors that mean the difference are under Luck's control. This spring or summer, the NFL owners are going to sit down at the bargaining table and ask for a rookie salary cap and it seems unlikely that the Players Association will put up much of a fight.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinefxramper From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 7298 posts, RR: 85
Reply 8, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1479 times:
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Luck's father, who's also the athletic director at West Virginia, said the possibility of an NFL lockout or being selected by the Panthers did not influence his son's decision.

This is a crock of shit if I've ever read one. So he didn't want to play for Carolina and Daddy is taking out an insurance policy that'll pay a fraction of a guaranteed NFL salary.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 5):
He's got an backup plan as an architect.

His degree plan is in design. He won't have the opportunity to be a license architect unless he goes back to school for another four years.


User currently offlinefuturepilot16 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2035 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1471 times:

Quoting fxramper (Reply 8):
His degree plan is in design. He won't have the opportunity to be a license architect unless he goes back to school for another four years.

Exactly. Most of these degrees from from schools like Stanford are Multi-Year degrees. Whether it be Medicine, Architecture, anything. You almost certainly have to go for your Masters and or PHD to make it worthwhile, that's another 6 years of higher learning. I'm not sure losing forty to fifty million dollars is worth just a Bachelors degree.

Quoting fxramper (Reply 8):
This is a crock of shit if I've ever read one. So he didn't want to play for Carolina and Daddy is taking out an insurance policy that'll pay a fraction of a guaranteed NFL salary.

He better learn to live with it because this is what comes with being number 1, it meas you have to go to the worst team. It might just be Carolina again next year.



"The brave don't live forever, but the cautious don't live at all."
User currently offlinegarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5395 posts, RR: 52
Reply 10, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1466 times:

Quoting futurepilot16 (Reply 9):
He better learn to live with it because this is what comes with being number 1, it meas you have to go to the worst team.


Not necessarily. All you have to do is stomp your feet, pout, and announce you'll hold out and reenter the draft if that team picks you and doesn't trade you to a market more suiting the tastes of you and your family. That's what I did and look at me! I have something that Rivers dude doesn't yet - a Super Bowl ring. Wait, what's that? Roethlisberger has two of them? Doh!

Signed, Eli Manning


[Edited 2011-01-07 07:51:11]


South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 11, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1457 times:

Quoting futurepilot16 (Reply 9):
I'm not sure losing forty to fifty million dollars is worth just a Bachelors degree.

Potentially. It could all work out fine and he gets his degree and the $50 million. But the money is not going to get any better and he is risking an awful lot for just a bachelor's degree. I don't think that this is a sound decision, but I hope he doesn't end up regretting it.

Quoting garnetpalmetto (Reply 10):
Not necessarily.

Also, if the team with the top pick is so cheap that they don't want to pay a draft pick that much money they may trade it. But with the success of young QBs like Matt Ryan ($34.5 million), Matthew Stafford ($41.7 million), and Sam Bradford ($50 million) the pieces are in place for a guy like Luck to hit a huge payday, but he is risking it and not all of the factors are under his control. Strike while the iron is hot, as they say, and for Luck, the iron will never be hotter and may well cool off.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13608 posts, RR: 61
Reply 12, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1417 times:
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I admire Andrew Luck's ideology, but from a common-sense perspective this is a foolish choice. He has 12 games, minimum, next season where he can not only potentially get injured, but could also have poor outings. Remember what happened to Jake Locker this past season? Most analysts concluded he would have been the #1 pick - ahead of Sam Bradford - if he'd gone pro this year. Instead, he went back to school and had a very poor showing in his first few games back, causing his stock to drop significantly. According to many reports, it's likely this alone will cost him somewhere in the neighborhood of $30-40M in earnings over the course of his NFL career.

Having a bad season and/or injuries isn't a given, mind you - but when you consider he had a 1-in-1 chance of having $50M plus in guaranteed money had he gone to the NFL this year, it seems that from a financial security standpoint this was a poor decision.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8153 posts, RR: 26
Reply 13, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1415 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
It's something that can't be described, but it's something that we all share. I don't hear grads from comparable institutions speaking this way about their schools.

Obviously you don't associate with Cal grads. The only thing the two schools have in common is an unshakeable disdain for the University of Slow Cognition down in Socal  
Quoting BMI727 (Reply 7):
You can't seriously believe that losing $40 million means nothing.

...except that perhaps to him, it does?



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19727 posts, RR: 58
Reply 14, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1406 times:

Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 12):
I admire Andrew Luck's ideology, but from a common-sense perspective this is a foolish choice. He has 12 games, minimum, next season where he can not only potentially get injured, but could also have poor outings. Remember what happened to Jake Locker this past season? Most analysts concluded he would have been the #1 pick - ahead of Sam Bradford - if he'd gone pro this year.

Luck isn't Bradford or Locker. I personally think he's a superior athlete. A once-in-a-decade star.

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 7):

You can't seriously believe that losing $40 million means nothing.

Wait, he's not losing anything. He never had the money. Suppose he accepted it, stopped out, and then there was a lockout. Then what? Just because someone says they'll pay you $50M doesn't mean that it's 100% certain.

But Andrew's shown that he's a good kid, takes his studies seriously, and wants to be a college grad. Ain't nothing wrong with that.


User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13608 posts, RR: 61
Reply 15, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1402 times:
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Quoting DocLightning (Reply 14):
Luck isn't Bradford or Locker. I personally think he's a superior athlete. A once-in-a-decade star

The same was being said of Locker, prior to his dismal showing this year at UW. And even a once-in-a-decade star can get hurt in freak plays.

Again, I admire his ideology, but if I'm his father and he asked my input, I'd have strongly recommended he take the leap into the NFL.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlinethegreatRDU From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2310 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1397 times:

I'm sorry but it was not a wise move by Luck    the man would have been an instant millionaire...before he suited up for his first Sunday game and the Panthers could have taken him #1 overall....
Stanford won't repeat and be as successful as they were this year....not only that he can get hurt

Quoting JBirdAV8r (Reply 6):
A (free!) Stanford education is not something to take lightly

A $65-75 million dollar contract is not something to take lightly....you can have your Stanford education...



Our Returning Champion
User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13608 posts, RR: 61
Reply 17, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1368 times:
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Another (potential) problem for Luck is his coach's decision to make the leap to the NFL, agreeing to a 5 year, $25M contract to coach the San Francisco 49ers. Now Stanford has to find another head coach.


"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13116 posts, RR: 12
Reply 18, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 1355 times:

Unlike too many potential top draft picks, Luck comes from a relatively well off family so probably doesn't have to worry about pocket money for himself or an impoverished family so he doesn't need or the family pressure for the money now. Perhaps too, he (along with his family in consultation) believes he needs another year of maturity, enjoys the experience of college and education at a top tier school, of having real friends without the money creating a wall. Getting a degree (I have a BA in Political Science from Rutgers Uinv.-Newark) is more than getting a job a field of study or making money, but for life itself, a personal accomplishment no one can take away. There is no price on that.

Yes, he may get big bucks up front, be we have seen too many 'sure thing' early draft picks end up injured early in their careers, on rotten teams or in bad mismatches, have problems from their immaturity and so on but only have the money and no degree as a life accomplishment. Let him have his decision, the one that he feels best with. It is his life.


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 19, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 1343 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 14):
Then what?

The he has time and a $50 million contract. Of course if he doesn't get signed due to the labor situation he can go back to school and work out and re-enter the draft. There is the possibility that he wouldn't get the big payday even entering this year, but it will almost certainly be gone next season.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 14):
Just because someone says they'll pay you $50M doesn't mean that it's 100% certain.

Actually it is. The $50 million would be just the signing bonus. The total value of the contract could easily top $80 million.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 14):
But Andrew's shown that he's a good kid, takes his studies seriously, and wants to be a college grad

If he takes his studies that seriously and he is as mature as everyone says, he will get his degree from somewhere whether he enters the draft or not. If Luck wants to be the best NFL player he can be, it would be wiser to enter the draft this year. His stock will never be higher. It isn't just a matter of waiting another year to get the money. That could be the case, but it might not be. The best he can do is more or less break even.

And honestly if I am an NFL general manager, I want guys who are completely committed and eat, sleep, and breathe football. In the combine or an interview, I would absolutely ask him for an explanation. It would definitely raise a red flag for me if his architecture degree or his girlfriend or his enjoyment of the college life is a higher priority than coming the to the NFL.

Quoting ltbewr (Reply 18):
be we have seen too many 'sure thing' early draft picks end up injured early in their careers, on rotten teams or in bad mismatches, have problems from their immaturity and so on but only have the money and no degree as a life accomplishment.

If Luck is as smart as everyone says he is (and I have no reason to believe otherwise) his chances of turning into MC Hammer are pretty low anyway.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets87 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1308 times:

I think it's funny how normally we criticize players in professional sports for not being "educated" and for only treating college as their quick time in the minor leagues before the pros. Then we have a guy who does decide to stay in college, complete his education, and now we're criticizing him for that. Does anyone consider that money isn't everything to all people? Perhaps (or maybe even obviously) Luck's decision is not motivated by money.

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 19):
And honestly if I am an NFL general manager, I want guys who are completely committed and eat, sleep, and breathe football. In the combine or an interview, I would absolutely ask him for an explanation. It would definitely raise a red flag for me if his architecture degree or his girlfriend or his enjoyment of the college life is a higher priority than coming the to the NFL.

Luck's decision tells me he's committed to what he's doing at the time, and that he'll move on when he's ready and that money isn't the deciding factor. As a GM, that might just say to me that once he is here he'll be committed to the NFL and that I don't have to worry about this guy skipping town for a slightly larger contract once he is on my team, like so many other players.

Quoting futurepilot16 (Reply 4):
I know some people say it's not all about the money, but I think that's a load of crap.

It might be to you because perhaps you think that way (not saying that sarcastically or mean-spirited). It's clear from his decision he doesn't think the same as you and that he has higher priorities than the money that comes from going Number 1 in the NFL draft.

Quoting ltbewr (Reply 18):
Let him have his decision, the one that he feels best with. It is his life.

  


User currently offlineAirport From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1301 times:

Wow, I'm quite surprised at the responses to this whole thing...

Quoting FlyDeltaJets87 (Reply 20):
I think it's funny how normally we criticize players in professional sports for not being "educated" and for only treating college as their quick time in the minor leagues before the pros. Then we have a guy who does decide to stay in college, complete his education, and now we're criticizing him for that. Does anyone consider that money isn't everything to all people? Perhaps (or maybe even obviously) Luck's decision is not motivated by money.

Well frackin said!      

Money isn't everything to everybody, and those who think that's a load of crap are wrong. There are bigger things, like the current quality of life, friendships and relationships, and the experiences which he might have to forgo by making the leap to the NFL. Maybe there are other reasons... who knows? It's his life, why can't he choose for himself the best lifestyle for him without being scrutinized?

Cheers!
Anthony/Airport


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 22, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1285 times:

Quoting FlyDeltaJets87 (Reply 20):
Luck's decision tells me he's committed to what he's doing at the time

If I'm running an NFL team, I don't want him committed to what he's doing now. I want him committed to football and being the best player at the highest level. Like I said, the fact that he wants to stay in college, earn his degree, hang with his friends or whatever would absolutely be a red flag as far as I'm concerned.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11361 posts, RR: 52
Reply 23, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1285 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
Someone needs to talk some sense into BMI727.

As a Stanford alumnus, Andrew Luck knows exactly what I do: that there is one and only one way to become a Stanford alum: to graduate.

I'm sorry, Stanford or not, you weren't a quarterback projected to go #1 in the draft.

Quoting FlyDeltaJets87 (Reply 20):
I think it's funny how normally we criticize players in professional sports for not being "educated" and for only treating college as their quick time in the minor leagues before the pros.

I'm not one of those people. College should be about gaining the skills to enter your chosen profession. If you gain those skills early, regardless of whether your name is Andrew Luck or BILL GATES, I will never criticize someone for coming out early.

In fact, having chosen to stay in school to finish his architecture degree, I don't think I'd want him to play on my team. This decision shows that he is more interested in Architecture than he is in football.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
Andrew is taking the advice given to any kid who wants to go into pro sports: "Always have a backup plan."

You should be aware that there is almost NOTHING you can do with an undergraduate architecture degree. Architecture requires graduate study if you want to make more than $50k a year and do things other than interior design.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
but you made the right decision.

He may have! But not for the reasons you stated.



Send me a PM at http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/sendmessage.main?from_username=NULL
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 24, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 1278 times:

Quoting D L X (Reply 23):
If you gain those skills early, regardless of whether your name is Andrew Luck or BILL GATES, I will never criticize someone for coming out early.

That is part of the reason that I hate the one-and-done rule in the NBA. There is no reason to force athletes to pretend they want to do something else if they don't.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
25 Post contains images Lufthansa411 : To add: There is a lot of personal (read social and mental) development that goes on at university that cannot be replicated in the same way removed
26 Post contains images fxramper : We've all seen the kid play a few seasons of college football. What are you talking about? He signs a contact with 90% guaranteed money. He most cert
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