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Japan Rebuilds Quake-damaged Roads In 6 Days  
User currently offlineSpringbok747 From Australia, joined Nov 2004, 4387 posts, RR: 10
Posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2163 times:

Wow..this is just amazing! Kudos to the Japanese for trying to normalize things as soon as possible..
If something like this happened here we would probably be still carrying out risk assessments and arguing over which council should foot the bill.


The picture of gaping chasms in a Japanese highway demonstrated the power of the March 11 earthquake.

Now the astonishing speed of reconstruction is being used to highlight the nation’s ability to get back on its feet.

Work began on March 17 and six days later the cratered section of the Great Kanto Highway in Naka was as good as new. It was ready to re-open to traffic last night.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...d-repaired-SIX-days-destroyed.html


אני תומך בישראל
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3733 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2114 times:

To somebody who knows something about roads and earthquake repairs, from a construction standpoint, that is not that impressive. From a bureaucratic standpoint, they did well.

150 meters of one outside lane shouldn't take more than 6 days using the methods they used. Shape and fill the slope, pack it, hopefully use some rock this time (they did not originally) spread asphalt on top, another slurry layer over the top of the entire section to blend it all in, paint and barrier posts. Finished. Judging by the pictures, they did not have a lot of work into the original roadbed, just layers of asphalt. Probably one of the reasons it looked so bad after. A year from now, there may be some signs of settling, not a big deal.


User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27342 posts, RR: 60
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2112 times:

Quoting Springbok747 (Thread starter):
Kudos to the Japanese for trying to normalize things as soon as possible..

You have to hand it to them. We have not had any natural disasters where I live and our roads are in a disgusting state holes everywhere ! The way in which the Japanese have kept law and order is also amazing.


User currently offlinegingersnap From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2010, 898 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2071 times:

Hell it takes most councils here about 2 months to repair a couple of potholes.

So something like this is impressive. Kudos to the Japanese.



Flown on: A306 A319/20/21 A332 B732/3/4/5/7/8 B742/4 B752 B762/3 B772/W C152 E195 F70/100 MD-82 Q400
User currently offlinedxing From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2059 times:

Quoting mham001 (Reply 1):
and barrier posts


And by the looks of it they could have reused the barrier posts they had there to begin with. It also looks as if they built a concrete retaining cover down the slope that was not there before as well.

Yep, you have to hand it to the Japanese, no looting, and very orderly. They are cleaning up their house and not being a bit pretentious about it.


User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8299 posts, RR: 26
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2056 times:

Quoting dxing (Reply 4):
no looting

A friend of mine who lives in Tokyo is dating a girl who works part-time at a 7-Eleven. Even with the runs on bottled water, rice and noodles and associated panic over continued accessibility of those products, she told him not one item has been reported stolen since the frenzy began a week ago. In a metropolis of ~35 million...imagine that!!



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21882 posts, RR: 55
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2035 times:

Quoting dxing (Reply 4):
Yep, you have to hand it to the Japanese, no looting, and very orderly. They are cleaning up their house and not being a bit pretentious about it.

   I know the Japanese culture has its share of issues, but the way they've been going about this whole thing has been inspiring.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlinemham001 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3733 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2019 times:

Quoting dxing (Reply 4):
It also looks as if they built a concrete retaining cover down the slope that was not there before as well.

Hard to say for sure, I thought it was plastic. Often used for temporary erosion control until natural vegetation can grow.


User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13210 posts, RR: 16
Reply 8, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2018 times:

I suspect that the Japanese Government includes in their earthquake emergency planning the immediate rebuilding of key roads where possible to sufficient levels to help with the distribution of supplies and to return to much as normal as possible to reduce the economic problems from such disasters.

User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15845 posts, RR: 27
Reply 9, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2006 times:

Quoting Springbok747 (Thread starter):

It's the Japanese. I'm surprised they didn't have it done sooner.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8299 posts, RR: 26
Reply 10, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 1987 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 9):
It's the Japanese. I'm surprised they didn't have it done sooner.

Another anecdote...if I may. As some may know, the Ala Moana Shopping Center is basically the capital of upscale tourist shopping in Honolulu. It may not hold the title anymore, but was consistently one of the most profitable malls in the nation, mainly owing to not having any real competition. In any case, when I first went with my wife last September, there were two lights out in a commonly-used elevator to reach the restaurant court on the 4th floor. On another visit months later in December, they were still out. The bulbs weren't replaced until at least FEBRUARY, as we visited again third week of February and they were off when visiting again in January. Six months go by in a facility not exactly starved for funds, before a light fixture was attended to.

The mall nearest my house where I used to live in Japan was quite busy, though maybe not as much so as Ala Moana. Certainly less profitable to be sure. In any case, there were never elevators out of order, or anything of the sort. Most importantly, there was a light fixture out in the first floor men's room one winter day in 2007. We returned to the mall the next day to return something and I used the restroom again - and the light had been replaced. Anything is possible, but I'll bet it didn't take six months to replace.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 20375 posts, RR: 59
Reply 11, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1895 times:

Quoting dxing (Reply 4):

Yep, you have to hand it to the Japanese, no looting, and very orderly. They are cleaning up their house and not being a bit pretentious about it.

Gotta say, they certainly earned the world's respect with their conduct. That was some tough stuff they've dealt with. For everyone there, there will be a division in their lives. There was "before" the tsunami and "after" it. Every memory in their life will be tied to that one event...when everything changed.

I will be interested to see what it looks like in six months. And in a year. And in five. By five years, I predict it will look like nothing happened at all...

I have doubts that my countrymen would handle it quite so well.


User currently offlineandz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8471 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1662 times:
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Quoting gingersnap (Reply 3):
Hell it takes most councils here about 2 months to repair a couple of potholes.

If things happened that fast in this country I would be mightily impressed. Potholes are a national disgrace here. In fact be careful when it rains....




After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 13, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1540 times:

Amazing hardworking folks these Japanese are.........


Think of the brighter side!
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