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Things You Love About Your Culture  
User currently offlineluckyone From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 2234 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2178 times:

After having a discussion with a friend about the (REAL!) differences growing up in different regions of a country and having traveled a fair bit, I thought I'd share some of mine, and inquire about others'.  

I was born and grew up in the South, and my entire family is originally from the South, so naturally mine will pertain to that. Some of them I'm sure are not unique to the South, but I associate it with growing up in the South. There's plenty I don't like, but let's stick to the positives please, and if something on anybody's list annoys you, so what! It's what they love about their culture, lol.

Sweet tea
Arnold Palmers
Church picnics
"y'all"
Holding the door for ladies
Manners in general -- most of them are unspoken, and it can be difficult to explain the mentality to somebody who didn't grow up with it, one of those cultural-isms I guess.
The laziness of a refined Southern accent -- a dying thing  
Snow Days being more fun than Christmas when you're a kid -- all three inches of it
Being able to say f*ck you you're an a** to somebody while sounding pleased as punch -- it's considered an artform
Ice cream with fruit cobbler
Red clay!!  

28 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 1, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2171 times:

INDIA is a Country of Diverse Worlds,Climates,Cultures,Religons,Languages,Terrains,Food,Music..... & Yet its the Worlds largest Democracy.

Tradition is so vast out here.From Food to Music there is so much of all.

Friends from all religons mix well.

Amazing place.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineLGWflyer From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2011, 2348 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 2149 times:

Well here in the UK, were to start?

Fisn n Chips
Tea
British Accent
Roast Dinners
British Comedy
LGW Airport hahah

and loads more which I can't be bothered to list haha.



3 words... I Love Aviation!!!
User currently offlinegoblin211 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 1209 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 2145 times:

Hollywood! ORD and the California girls! Florida girls too.


From the airport with love
User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5740 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 2137 times:

Arizona:










I guess Filiberto's is good when I'm wasted at 3AM.

(sorry, but I can't stand the culture here.)



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlineBAViscount From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 2338 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 2131 times:

Aaaah, England my England!! I love the history, the green rolling hills, the chocolate box villages, the coastline with its dramatic cliffs, quaint fishing villages, broad sandy bays and rocky coves. The cities (outside the suburbs of London!)...I dare anyone to visit Birmingham and not fall in love with the place! I love the general camaraderie of the people...I love how I can visit a supermarket and exchange friendly banter with the person on the till! I love how we have such a diversity of cultures...I can go to a beautiful thatched country pub and have a delicious Sunday roast, or can head to an area such as Hounslow or Tooting and have an amazing curry. I love how I can select a cuisine that I fancy eating and chances are that I can find a restaurant not too far away that will give me just what I'm looking for...Lebanese, Filipino, Thai, Ethiopian, Chinese, Russian, Polish, Korean, Iranian, Mexican, pretty much every country in Europe, heck, even American should I feel so inclined!!

There are countries in Europe that have distinct words for coziness, such as 'hygge' in Scandinavia and 'gezelig' in the Netherlands, although we have no such equivalent in the UK, but I think we should! If we were to have such a word, it would encompass such things as log fires, country lanes, thatched cottages, verdant valleys, 'The Generation Game', Ant & Dec, Spangles and Curly Wurlies!! 



Ladies & gentlemen this is Captain Tobias Wilcock welcoming you aboard Coconut Airways flight 372 to Bridgetown Barb
User currently offlineshamrock604 From Ireland, joined Sep 2007, 4227 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2031 times:

Ireland, ah where do I begin!

That off-the-wall sense of humour. The complete and total ability to laugh at ourselves, but how dare YOU if you try laughing at us!  

Being able to strike a conversation with pretty much anyone and not be considered wierd. The daily exchange of humour over just about any situation.

Olde world values of family, togetherness and loyalty.

Some of the world's most spectacular scenery, the sheer amount of open space. At the faintest hint of sun, everyone almost immediately strips off....

We are so disparaging of our own "cuisine", you can get pretty much everyone else's here if you like. The Pubs - the boisterous, raucous laughter, the characters therein.

Rugby - and how passionate our fans are. Our ancient Celtic arts and mysticism. The Gaelic sport of hurling, and its lightening speed.

How everyone celebrates our National saint's day with us, and make an even bigger deal of it than we do.

The fact that without invading anywhere, we have managed to get all over the world.....

Now ask me what I dont like about my culture... and I will fill another page.  



Flown EI,FR,RE,EIR,VE,SI,TLA,BA,BE,BD,VX,MON,AF,YS,WX,KL,SK,LH,OK,OS,LX,IB,LTU,HLX,4U,SU,CO,DL,UA,AC,PR,MH,SQ,QF, EY, EK
User currently offlineBNAOWB From United States of America, joined Dec 2009, 400 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1986 times:

Quoting luckyone (Thread starter):
Manners in general -- most of them are unspoken, and it can be difficult to explain the mentality to somebody who didn't grow up with it, one of those cultural-isms I guess.

As a life-long American Southerner, I will attempt to expound on these unspoken rules pertaining to manners (I only became aware of these upon marrying a non-Southerner who did not understand these unspoken rules):

1) NEVER debate with or disagree with an older relative.
2) Never make a "public scene" (expressing anger at a shop clerk, restaurant worker, etc.)
3) Avoid honking your car horn unless absolutely necessary.
4) Avoid conflict at all costs.
5) NEVER criticize Southern people or the South.

So, in some ways, American Southern culture has traces of similarities to an Asian culture.

Off topic, Luckyone, is that Yerevan, Armenia, in the second photo on your User Profile? If so, I would love to hear about your trip there. Feel free to IM me. I absolutely love that country!


User currently offlinedeltaownsall From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1173 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1974 times:

Let's see...I'm from Naples, FL, which certainly isn't "the South," but isn't quite Miami either. But a lot of this applies to America in general:

1) General Camaraderie/Friendliness. I really took this for granted before I lived abroad, but things like the random helpfulness of people that you don't even know, in so many different environments/situations here, are simple ones that I've come to really appreciate.

2) Acceptance of different lifestyles/types of people/etc. Staring at people simply because they're different than you is not socially acceptable, nor common.

3) Casual/Down-to-earth manners and dispositions. Holding doors/elevators for people, obeying lines/queues, please and thank-you, etc. Manners are extremely important, but they don't necessitate, and certainly do not stem from, a sense of arrogance and exclusivity. Classic American manners, to me, are respectful but not overly proper. It's not about being better than someone, it's about having respect for everyone regardless of their social standing/upbringing.

Basically, while there is plenty of economic inequality in the States, there is still a strong underlying sense of social egalitarianism, and certainly much less emphasis on birth and wealth than a number of countries that I have been to. Of course, I'm sure that's just how I see things...

Edit: How could I leave this out:

American Sports! Basketball and "American" Football in particular...especially college level...nothing like it anywhere else!

[Edited 2011-04-15 17:51:01]

User currently offlineNoUFO From Germany, joined Apr 2001, 7966 posts, RR: 12
Reply 9, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1964 times:

German sense of discipline and orderliness:


Our undeniable sense of style:


Our love for nature:


German efficiency:


No fake friendliness:


[Edited 2011-04-15 17:15:14]


I support the right to arm bears
User currently offlineJetBlue777 From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 1468 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1954 times:

Born in the Philippines from a Pakistani-Turkish family , grew up in New York City, lives in New York City.

What I love about the Philippines:

http://www.travelpp.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Pangulasian-Island-From-El-Nido-Palawan-Philippines.jpg

Our beaches



Filipino food, which is mainly Spanish with a touch of Chinese, Arabic and other Asian influences.

As for New York

1) The diversity of people, food and culture
2) The Manhattan Skyline
3) New York Yankees  
4) JFK airport 
5) JetBlue and Delta's Hubs  
6) 24/7 Public Transpo.
7) Times Square
8) A LOT MORE

I just love the city, the noise of ambulances, firetrucks, cars honking, the subway noises and the rude people....ahhh   



I don't know much about my Turkish or Pakistan heritage, so to all of the Turkish/Pakistani a.netters, educate me  



It's a cultural thing.
User currently offlineluckyone From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 2234 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1954 times:

Quoting BNAOWB (Reply 7):
1) NEVER debate with or disagree with an older relative.
2) Never make a "public scene" (expressing anger at a shop clerk, restaurant worker, etc.)
3) Avoid honking your car horn unless absolutely necessary.
4) Avoid conflict at all costs.
5) NEVER criticize Southern people or the South.

Let me add to that  

6) Anybody with the remotest possibility of being older to you gets a sir/ma'am until it's sorted out
7) In a similar vein -- strangers are Sir and Ma'am until they aren't, and elders are still Sir and Ma'am until you die.
8) Never insult the local SEC team...though I break this one all the time as I hate UGA.

Quoting BNAOWB (Reply 7):
Off topic, Luckyone, is that Yerevan, Armenia, in the second photo on your User Profile? If so, I would love to hear about your trip there. Feel free to IM me. I absolutely love that country!

Sure is. I'll send you a PM.


User currently offlineaerorobnz From Rwanda, joined Feb 2001, 7396 posts, RR: 16
Reply 12, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1925 times:

New Zealand

I love the lifestyle, I love the landscape I love the coffee culture. You cannot buy filter coffee here.

Other than that, NZ is only an OK place to live in.


User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 1921 times:

Culture? What is that?

Signed,

99% of America    


User currently offlinedeltaownsall From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1173 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1881 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 13):
Culture? What is that?

Signed,

99% of America

Who's throwing that tomato!? This is quite possibly the most popular joke in the history of non-av...


User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15835 posts, RR: 27
Reply 15, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 1864 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 13):
What is that?

Going to museums to look at paintings that look a lot like what comes out of the local preschool?

Quoting luckyone (Reply 11):
8) Never insult the local SEC team.

The southern college football cretins are like no others. Like the whole tree thing.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineBraybuddy From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 5815 posts, RR: 31
Reply 16, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 1835 times:

Quoting shamrock604 (Reply 6):
Ireland, ah where do I begin!

Pretty much agree with everything here, though you can keep Paddy's Day (too much Paddywhackery and booze) and the sporting angle (not a sports fan at all) . . .

I'd add "casualness and informality" to the list. While the former gets to me at times (particularly when you're expecting something or someone on time), on balance I think it's a good thing. A friend dropped by unannounced one Saturday morning and ended-up staying not just for lunch, but dinner as well. Was a great day!

While we may have our problems, it's still a good place to live and bring-up children. And it's too small a country to have serious barriers to social mobility: the ability to talk is as much -- if not more of -- a door-opener than money or social status.


User currently offlineshamrock604 From Ireland, joined Sep 2007, 4227 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1795 times:

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 16):
I'd add "casualness and informality" to the list. While the former gets to me at times (particularly when you're expecting something or someone on time), on balance I think it's a good thing. A friend dropped by unannounced one Saturday morning and ended-up staying not just for lunch, but dinner as well. Was a great day!

While we may have our problems, it's still a good place to live and bring-up children. And it's too small a country to have serious barriers to social mobility: the ability to talk is as much -- if not more of -- a door-opener than money or social status.

Agree on all counts!

Also, the fact that Irish people still manage to get outraged at crime, social issues etc that really go un - noticed in most modern societies. While our sometimes OTT reactions piss me off, I like that people still care enough to get upset in the first place.

Oh, and I love the fact that we want to be bigger, better and more succesful than the small size of our little country dictates... that might have taken a dent lately, but you know we'll be back fighting!



Flown EI,FR,RE,EIR,VE,SI,TLA,BA,BE,BD,VX,MON,AF,YS,WX,KL,SK,LH,OK,OS,LX,IB,LTU,HLX,4U,SU,CO,DL,UA,AC,PR,MH,SQ,QF, EY, EK
User currently offlineronglimeng From Canada, joined Oct 2006, 626 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1732 times:

I don’t think I’m proud about anything within my culture!

I just accept the normal variations within Canadian culture as being the norm. When I go anywhere else, I compare what I experience there against my norm. Sometimes things are better, sometimes, worse.

I like the slogan one of my countrymen abroad had on his sweater: “Content to be Canadian!”

I’d like to make a comment about “rude” New Yorkers though. We were waiting in NYC on what seemed to be an active subway platform, as people streamed by us. One passer-by said in an impatient voice “I hope you’re not waiting here for train?” Ahh, yes, we were, thanks mister! Helpful without being sweet about it!


User currently offlineshamrock604 From Ireland, joined Sep 2007, 4227 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (3 years 8 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 1705 times:

Quoting ronglimeng (Reply 18):
I don’t think I’m proud about anything within my culture!

If I were you, I sure would be proud.

Canadians have great humour, are laid back and are welcoming and accepting.

Lots to be proud of!



Flown EI,FR,RE,EIR,VE,SI,TLA,BA,BE,BD,VX,MON,AF,YS,WX,KL,SK,LH,OK,OS,LX,IB,LTU,HLX,4U,SU,CO,DL,UA,AC,PR,MH,SQ,QF, EY, EK
User currently offlineaznmadsci From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 3716 posts, RR: 6
Reply 20, posted (3 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 1611 times:

Quoting luckyone (Thread starter):
"y'all"

I love speaking in my Texas twang and saying "y'all" every time I go to the West Coast or Vancouver. They expect me to have a thick Asian accent and just completely surprised when I bust out with "Bless your heart, sugar! How Y'all doin?"   



The journey of life is not based on the accomplishments, but the experience.
User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 4068 posts, RR: 30
Reply 21, posted (3 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 1592 times:

I just had a big conference in NYC this weekend discussing this. I like to think that something most Portuguese have in common is that they fit in really quickly, are very good at adapting to new circumstances. Wherever you go in the world, Brits will always be Brits, Spaniards will always be Spaniards, etc. - this goes for posture, social circles, etc. On the other hand, Portuguese people will blend in very well with the local culture, to the point they will go almost incognito. Hergé had a character in Tintin that is quite a good caricature of a Portuguese person - no matter where in the world Tintin goes, no matter how exotic, he is already, slumming it with the locals (and selling them stuff).

Whenever American people I meet tell me they don't know any Portuguese people I usually reply we are like ninjas - you might be surrounded by Portuguese people right now and not even know it.



Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineaerdingus From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 2862 posts, RR: 15
Reply 22, posted (3 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1494 times:

There are lots of things wrong with Ireland right now, but at least we cans till have the craic (and educate others as to what it is while they don't even realise they're "havin" it)

 



Cabin crew blog http://dolefuldolegirl.blogspot.ie/
User currently offlineAsturias From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 2156 posts, RR: 16
Reply 23, posted (3 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1419 times:

Quoting Pyrex (Reply 21):
Hergé had a character in Tintin that is quite a good caricature of a Portuguese person - no matter where in the world Tintin goes, no matter how exotic, he is already, slumming it with the locals (and selling them stuff).


Senhor Oliveira da Figueira   he was everywhere!

Quoting Pyrex (Reply 21):
Spaniards will always be Spaniards, etc.

Wouldn't have it any other way! 

What I like about my culture:

1. We will always be Spanish, and yet there are so many kinds! Castellanos, Catalanes, Gallegos, Vascos etc. etc. all with their particularities and customs.

2. Our food, the raw materials for cooking and the gastronomic culture in general. I love it.

3. Our sense of tradition, respect for the elders and the strong connection to our past.

4. We sometimes remember that Portugal exists 

asturias



Tonight we fly
User currently offlineoa260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27337 posts, RR: 60
Reply 24, posted (3 years 8 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1411 times:

Hmm well being mixed background from two very strong cultures I love lots about them.


Greek :

The food , Souvlaki/Tiropittas/Salads/Olives/Mousakka/Wines

The wonderful Islands and beaches.

The traditions and music.

The history of Ancient Greece and the ancient sites dotted around the country .


Guyanese-Indian :

The food , Biryani,korma,tikka,daal takka,birfi,rassogulla

The history and music.

The amazing buildings and ability to make something out of nothing.


25 signol : Having just come back from a visit to New York, I found the people to be the friendliest of any big city I've been to! signol
26 shamrock604 : I second that. I found New Yorkers to be incredibly polite and friendly. Sure, they dont suffer fools easily, but I found manners and willingness to
27 LGWflyer : Yep and I third that! Was in NYC for the New Year and had no bother at all, great people.
28 BOStonsox : I'm from Neponset Valley area, Massachusetts, and like everyone else here I'm all about the Red Sox (hence the username) and Clam Chowdah! I love most
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