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College Decision?!  
User currently offlineMHTripple7 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1105 posts, RR: 8
Posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1624 times:

Hi all,

I am quite stressed at the moment. I need to pick a college tomorrow, and cannot narrow it down anymore. Here is my situation:

I need to decide between Washington University in St. Louis, Georgetown, and Washington & Lee.

I am also wait-listed at Harvard...

A pros and cons list has not helped, as these schools are all extremely different. I would be swimming for whichever one I choose as well.

Some opinions would be greatly appreciated!

27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineFly2HMO From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1619 times:

Quoting MHTripple7 (Thread starter):
Some opinions would be greatly appreciated!

Well, have you toured any of these places? If you haven't, bad idea waiting until now. The tour is what sold me when I chose my school. It's the only way to get a decent feeling as an outsider as to what it's like, IMO.


User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8278 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1612 times:

The first question is "what is your planned major"?

How do the schools fit with your current planning?

What is the long term financial burden you (or your parents) would be facing at the various schools? I'll assume that the swimming would off-set costs at various schools (except Harvard?) but there are still going to be other costs to face.

BTW, Congrats on achieving the options!


Let us know where you choose and all the best, where ever you go.


User currently offlineMHTripple7 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1105 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1600 times:

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 1):
Well, have you toured any of these places? If you haven't, bad idea waiting until now. The tour is what sold me when I chose my school. It's the only way to get a decent feeling as an outsider as to what it's like, IMO.

I have seen each campus, and like them all. I have done a huge amount of research on each one, and each has different strengths and weaknesses. I am just having a hard time figuring out which strengths are most important.

Quoting Ken777 (Reply 2):

The first question is "what is your planned major"?

How do the schools fit with your current planning?

What is the long term financial burden you (or your parents) would be facing at the various schools? I'll assume that the swimming would off-set costs at various schools (except Harvard?) but there are still going to be other costs to face.

Planning on undergrad business. All have a b-school. And swimming is not actually offsetting costs, none of these schools give out swimming scholarships. It's just that swimming essentially got me in. I am extremely lucky in that my parents can pay for whichever college I attend.


User currently offlineaa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3350 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1571 times:

Quoting MHTripple7 (Reply 3):
I have seen each campus, and like them all. I have done a huge amount of research on each one, and each has different strengths and weaknesses. I am just having a hard time figuring out which strengths are most important.

For one, chill out. Those are three excellent schools and I'm sure you'll be happy at either.

I transferred after my freshman year to a nearby school that has a much better reputation, both in the area and regionally. The main reason I transferred was because my new school is of higher academic quality. But based on my experiences at two schools, and as a transfer student, I think these are some good things to think about.

Number one is location! You're in at a school in a major city (DC), a midsized "second tier" city (no offense, St. Louis) and in a smaller town. How important is being near a major city to you? This seems to be a deal breaker for a lot of people. People who grew up in larger cities may have trouble being in more rural environments. Less commonly, the opposite is true.

Also on the topic of location, what do you want to do? Obviously, if you want to go into politics, DC as a location is going to be hard to beat because of all of the good connection and internship opportunities.

I don't know much about the size of these schools, but what about size? Include total size and average class sizes. Will you be comfortable learning in a lecture hall with 300 people? Is it okay if the professor doesn't know your name even at the end of the semester? Would you prefer to have the anonymity of a larger campus?

These are the big things I can think of. As far as major goes, that's also something to consider. Remember though that quite a few people wind up changing their majors. I'm sure these schools all offer an excellent education in all of the departments they have.

If you've visited the schools and done the research and still can't decide, you know what that probably means? That you'll be very happy at any of them. So think about whatever differences there are, how important each is to you and then go with your gut.


User currently offlineBOStonsox From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1990 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1568 times:

Which city do you like best? Saint Louis, Washington, or Lexington, VA? After all, you'll be living there. That was part of how I chose my undergrad school.

And if you get into Harvard, Cambridge and Boston are always the best, but seeing as you're from NH I'm sure you already know.

[Edited 2011-04-28 17:47:52]


2013 World Series Champions!
User currently offlineSpeedbird741 From Portugal, joined Aug 2008, 654 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1534 times:

As I do not know much about either of those schools, I will refrain from giving you any (modest) advice on that subject. However, and if I may, do let me comment on the following:

Quoting MHTripple7 (Reply 3):
Planning on undergrad business

First, let me tell you I have a very strong and inflexible opinion on this subject. However, I will try to be very grounded in giving you my opinion. Unless you are very much averse to getting a more scientific or technical degree, I recommend that you think deeply about changing your intended major. Firstly, If you pursue a more challenging (and useful) degree such as engineering or physics, nothing will stop you from getting an MBA in the future. On the other hand, if you pursue a degree in business, you will be limited to that field. Secondly, should you enroll in a business undergrad program you will find a good portion of the classes to be useless. You will be taking a lot of pointless classes like human resource management, organizational behaviour, ethics, and so forth. Finally, if you choose engineering for example, you can always take classes in economics, finance, or accounting as electives. Furthermore, have a look at the good old www.bls.gov and see for yourself what jobs in each field look like.
Now, in the event that you decide to pursue a degree in business, please oh please select the school that places the greastest emphasis on quantitative skills.
I which you the best MH!

Speedbird741



Boa noite Faro, Air Portugal 257 climbing flight level 340
User currently offlineaa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3350 posts, RR: 7
Reply 7, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 1525 times:

I just saw that you're planning on majoring in business. I'm also a business major.

Quoting Speedbird741 (Reply 6):
Firstly, If you pursue a more challenging (and useful) degree such as engineering or physics, nothing will stop you from getting an MBA in the future. On the other hand, if you pursue a degree in business, you will be limited to that field.

I agree that business as an undergraduate field is in some cases less than ideal. But you're also assuming that he'll enjoy majoring in physics or engineering. While majoring in business may not have the same opportunities as, say, physics, there are still plenty of fields that remain open.

Quoting Speedbird741 (Reply 6):
Secondly, should you enroll in a business undergrad program you will find a good portion of the classes to be useless. You will be taking a lot of pointless classes like human resource management, organizational behaviour, ethics, and so forth.

At my undergrad business school, I find that our curriculum is much too narrow. We have so many required courses (business core and major classes) that there isn't a lot of room to take free electives and I think that's a shame. I've also had to sit through some bullshit courses, like an upper division class on leadership (!).

However, lots of other classes are not bullshit. Economics, accounting, finance, marketing, statistics, calculus are all required in our business core and I don't consider them fluff.

Quoting Speedbird741 (Reply 6):
Finally, if you choose engineering for example, you can always take classes in economics, finance, or accounting as electives

Maybe. At my school, registration in business courses are closed to majors and minors. Majors may take whatever they like, but minors may only take the required courses. An engineering major would definitely not be allowed to enroll in any of the courses you mentioned, except maybe lower division economics.

In short, I'm not sure if I'd major in business again. Was it as valuable as it could be? Maybe not. At the end of the day, though, it's the subject I like the most and I've definitely learned something. You should definitely keep an open mind and consider changing or adding a major other than business, even if you see yourself winding up in business in the future.


User currently offlineSpeedbird741 From Portugal, joined Aug 2008, 654 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1480 times:

Quoting aa757first (Reply 8):
But you're also assuming that he'll enjoy majoring in physics or engineering.

No, I am not. Hence my not saying that he should pursue another degree, but simply to give it thought.

Quoting aa757first (Reply 8):
While majoring in business may not have the same opportunities as, say, physics, there are still plenty of fields that remain open.

I would say there are even more opportunities. Quite simply, there are also more people pursuing those opportunities whereas in the more "limited" physics, the pool of qualified workers is very much smaller. You can easily see what I am saying by looking at the median and average pays in various professions in each of the fields.

Quoting aa757first (Reply 8):
However, lots of other classes are not bullshit. Economics, accounting, finance, marketing, statistics, calculus are all required in our business core and I don't consider them fluff.

By no means are these classes close to being bullshit. On the contrary in fact.

Quoting aa757first (Reply 8):
An engineering major would definitely not be allowed to enroll in any of the courses you mentioned, except maybe lower division economics.

Yup, it depends on the university.

Quoting aa757first (Reply 8):
In short, I'm not sure if I'd major in business again. Was it as valuable as it could be? Maybe not. At the end of the day, though, it's the subject I like the most and I've definitely learned something.

Same here.

Speedbird741



Boa noite Faro, Air Portugal 257 climbing flight level 340
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8153 posts, RR: 26
Reply 9, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1466 times:

Georgetown has the strongest name recognition nationally of the three, which is more important now than ever. Frankly if my kids were of the age to be college-bound I'd advise them to forget college altogether unless they were accepted to Ivy League, similar private, or upper-tier public schools. Otherwise, should just study a trade like electrician and do something useful.


If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlinesna752 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 127 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1460 times:

I'll keep this as brief as I can, and hopefully this is of some use to you:

I am graduating from the University of Southern California in two weeks with a BA in Economics. I was admitted 'undeclared' and was heading in the direction to attend Marshall School of Business at USC. I started taking my core classes, which included some GE's and then a few economics classes. As I worked through those Economics classes, I reaffirmed how much I hated math. I earned a spot at a mutual fund in Orange County over a summer break and that's when I started to see the value of math and economics. Not only could I understand financial statements, but Fed annoucements, unemployment rates and the like made MUCH more sense. I decided to change course, earn a minor in Business Law and change my major to Economics. Having completed all of my upper-level Economics courses (11 300/400 level classes), I can honestly say that I'm very glad I sacked it up and took the math on. It pushed me, many times to my breaking point, but it helps so much at work.

Since Economics is mostly math and calculations (at higher levels), I broadened by understanding of finance by tutoring my peers in English, Accounting, Finance and Balance Sheet Analysis so that I would have a more complete picture of the markets. I have also decided that Research and Quantitative Analysis is a strong suit for me, so I have decided to pursue the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation, which in many respects, is considered more valuable than a MBA. I'll likely end up earning both in due time, though.

That said, I think there is certain value in choosing a non-business degree. I'm absolutely confident that I can do anything -from quant analysis to manage people to write about English literature, whereas with a business degree, I'm not sure I have the mathematical skills to hang with some of the other guys in the office. You can see on here, too, that many of my posts are math based (which is difficult to argue and easy to be eschewed aside by those that don't understand it), but I find there is value in that.

Do what you love. Keep building on your strong suits, but don't neglect your weak ones. That's how you'll grow. It's pretty cool looking back!



Dare to think different.
User currently offlineelmothehobo From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1540 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1385 times:

Georgetown.

I didn't go there (went to American University up the street), but GU is a great school, it's in an incredibly cityand it has a great undergrad B-school. I have a couple friends who graduated from or are currently attending Georgetown, they all really like Georgetown.

For me, at least, it would be a no-brainer, but then again, I did this all six years ago.

If you have questions about DC PM me. Good luck, and congratulations!


User currently offlineflymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7175 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1369 times:

Quoting MHTripple7 (Thread starter):
Washington University in St. Louis, Georgetown,

I would chose between these two. But IMO quality of life will be better at Georgetown. I go to school at GWU in DC graduating in about two weeks actually. Its a great city to go to school in. Been to the Georgetown campus many times was up there today. Its a nice campus. Has a great name and also Washington D.C. BY FAR has the best opportunities for internships during the year and summer etc.. You can meet a lot of important people in DC of course. I have loved DC the past 4 years I have been here.



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineplaneguy727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 1343 times:

As a higher education administrator at an Ivy I would say that if you are using name recognition, consider the following:

Georgetown is well know by the average person, Washington University is seen by academics as being more intellectually challenging, Washington & Lee sits at the bottom of the three choices.

If you plan to pursue a graduate degree in Business, your degree from WU would be better help than one from the other choices (all other factors being equal).

Also keep in mind that G'town is a catholic school. For some individuals, religiously affiliated schools introduce other opportunities and challenges that may influence the decision of where to attend.

Regardless of your choice, you are likely to have access to a great education and many co-curricular opportunities. Much of college is about the decisions you make while you are there.



I want to live in an old and converted 727...
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19724 posts, RR: 58
Reply 14, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1321 times:

Quoting Aaron747 (Reply 10):
Georgetown has the strongest name recognition nationally of the three, which is more important now than ever.

First of all, I am a Stanford graduate (twice, B.S. and M.S.) and am an alumni admissions representative. so I know a thing or two about college admissions.

I'm inclined to agree with Aaron. The name of the school that you are at will get you internships and it will then get you grad school admissions and/or jobs. Also, my husband went to WashU in St. Louis and, while he enjoyed it there, even he agrees that STL stinks (the city... although the airport ain't so hot, either). Besides, Washington D.C. has better plane spotting!  

Washington and Lee is right out of the picture. Strike that off the list. I've never even heard of it, honestly. EVERYONE has heard of Georgetown.

My advice to you is Georgetown.

Once you make the decision, you will sit back and relax. And congrats, Georgetown is no small achievement, nor is WashU.

And (assuming you're 18 because I'm not a total lech) we (the Pink A.netters) demand a photo of you in your racing suit as payment for my advice.  


User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8544 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1308 times:

Harvard won't take wait listers unless you possess some kind of magic I don't know about.

WashU -- a friend of mine went there and it is known as a very fine university.

Georgetown --also very good, a bit smaller, and possibly DC has more appeal than St. Louis. But I would be very torn between Georgetown and WashU. They are both basically top-tier universities, with WashU maybe a bit more "heavy duty" in terms of large university resources in the sciences. But you could argue I am wrong. Georgetown has a bit more flash and WashU a bit more substance. Just an amateur opinion.

Wash & Lee -- looks like a great small school that has special qualities neither big city university can match. It really depends what you want.... you have to know how you hope to spend these 4 years LEARNING... and who you want to meet... the end.

I would caution harshly against _just_ pandering to name recognition. Clearly Georgetown is the most popular in terms of name recognition. That does not mean it is the best school for you. Don't completely equate "name value" with the real value of this time over the many years of your life. If you go to a place because it is famous, that's a vacuous and circular reason to go there. Knowing a bit more about universities now than I once did, I realize all big research universities are peers, and offer similar opportunities -- whether it is Harvard, UW-Madison, or UC-Boulder.

Similarly, small schools offer a great education, whether it is Amherst, WashLee, Wellesley College, Oberlin or a million others. People from any of these schools can, and do, rise to the very tippy top of their field. If I heard someone went to Princeton, and therefore they are a genius -- that's foolish. Look, I know some pretty dumb people who went to Princeton. And some smart people who went to "no-name" colleges (who today have very "famous" jobs FWIW). The popular perception should not entirely replace your own proclivities, instincts, quirks, and what you want YOUR life to look and feel like.

But if you're really not sure, go famous. I went the northernmost Ivy and it was nice, but kind of corroded by the market forces of its own fame... everyone hoping to work at a hedge fund, be a corporate lawyer or dermatologist (i.e, not a place for real free spirits). But there are worse thing than being wretchedly wealthy and powerful, I guess.

[Edited 2011-04-29 20:03:12]

User currently offlineflymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7175 posts, RR: 9
Reply 16, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 1301 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 15):
Besides, Washington D.C. has better plane spotting!

DC is a nice place for aviation fans that's for sure.

Quoting Flighty (Reply 16):
possibly DC has more appeal than St. Louis.

Saint Louis is not the best place in the world.



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlinejcs17 From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 8065 posts, RR: 38
Reply 17, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1260 times:

Ummm....

You're waitlisted at Harvard. Got into Washington University, Washington & Lee, and Georgetown.

No offense, dude, but you realize that 9/10ths of the college grads in the US actually decided on colleges less prestigious than this without the help of a web forum. One thinks you might be gloating.



America's chickens are coming home to rooooost!
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19724 posts, RR: 58
Reply 18, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 1251 times:

Quoting Flighty (Reply 16):

But if you're really not sure, go famous. I went the northernmost Ivy and it was nice, but kind of corroded by the market forces of its own fame... everyone hoping to work at a hedge fund, be a corporate lawyer or dermatologist (i.e, not a place for real free spirits). But there are worse thing than being wretchedly wealthy and powerful, I guess.

My brother graduated from that school in 1984. I never got the sense from that student body (I was accepted, but chose not to go) that they were all $tarry-eyed. For the most part, I saw a bunch of really smart sports and nature geeks who didn't mind living three hours from the closest major airport. Gorgeous campus, even during Winter.

Stanford has a very different feel. To give you an example, Andrew Luck's recent decision to decline the NBA draft this year puzzled a lot of people. How could he turn down that much money? The reason is that Stanford students in general seem rather unconcerned about money, although many do wind up becoming quite wealthy. Basically, it's a school of geeks, whether science geeks, engineering geeks, humanities geeks, etc. Most of the kids there are studying what they're studying because they're fascinated by it, and then they try to use whatever they learn to do something useful.

OMG, my dog just farted while sitting right next to m...

*keels over dead of asphyxia*         


User currently offlinetexan From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 4278 posts, RR: 52
Reply 19, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 1238 times:

Quoting flymia (Reply 17):
Saint Louis is not the best place in the world.

The area around Wash U is gorgeous. Forest Park is one of my favorite places in the U.S. to go out and enjoy a day outside. With the light rail stopping right at the school now, you're just a quick trip from sports games (St. Louis is the greatest sports city in the country), shopping, downtown, or the airport.

I actually really like St. Louis. And Wash U is very well known for its business school and law school. A lot of it depends on the career track you might want to follow. I like Wash U and St. Louis because, while the school is an elite school and you do have pressure to perform, I don't get the feeling that the pressure is as intense as on the East Coast.

That is definitely not to denigrate the other schools: Georgetown is wonderful. And I know a handful of successful businessmen and women who went to Washington & Lee.

It should all come down to your comfort level. I had to decide between a school in Texas, a SoCal school, and a school in St. Louis. I chose St. Louis because of the program and the comfort level I had with the atmosphere of the school and what I had heard about it. Turned out to be the best decision and St. Louis is a lot better than what most people say.

Texan



"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
User currently offlinepdxtriple7 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 695 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1166 times:

You've probably made your decision by now. You can't go wrong. Ultimately, all three are very good schools. You're experience will be dependent on what you do on and off campus (as well as luck).

I think geographic preference is somewhat important. At Georgetown, you are more likely to end up on the East Coast, where as WashU, you're more likely to end up in the midwest/Chicago for business. While I had plenty of friends from my East Coast school end up on the West Coast, the majority of the jobs were for the East Coast. It's something to keep in mind.


User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7780 posts, RR: 16
Reply 21, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1145 times:

I am lazy this morning and didn't read any of the previous replies -- beyond a quick skim or two.

Each of these three schools are all pretty different places. Washington DC vs. St Louis vs. Lexington, VA.... all very very different locales. And each school has a pretty different and unique student culture as well..... especially W&L. For me it would come down to which town/city would I want to be living in for the next 4-5 years. And in that decision what are my opportunities like for summer interships/work opportunities, etc. I am coming from the perspective that ultimately where you go to college will become your home. After my sophomore year I did not go home for the summer. Which city/town will you be most happy in? If you after you graduate will you be able to find work in your field? (having to not pay to relocate is kind of a big deal).



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineMHTripple7 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1105 posts, RR: 8
Reply 22, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1121 times:

Thank you all for your helpful opinions. I decided on Washington University in STL. Despite the fact it doesn't have the brand of Georgetown and is in an "inferior" city, I liked the overall school, campus, swim team, coaches, and feel the best. Essentially I just went with my gut. I realize that it may be a little harder to get internships, but I think I'll be alright.

Quoting elmothehobo (Reply 12):
I didn't go there (went to American University up the street), but GU is a great school, it's in an incredibly cityand it has a great undergrad B-school. I have a couple friends who graduated from or are currently attending Georgetown, they all really like Georgetown.

Yeah I really liked it too, however, I was pretty nervous about balancing all the school work with 11 practices a week (doubles Monday-Friday, one on Saturday morning).

Quoting planeguy727 (Reply 14):

As a higher education administrator at an Ivy I would say that if you are using name recognition, consider the following:

Georgetown is well know by the average person, Washington University is seen by academics as being more intellectually challenging, Washington & Lee sits at the bottom of the three choices.

Yes, these were pretty much my conclusions. Decided to sacrifice slightly better name recognition for a slightly better school IMO.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 15):
I'm inclined to agree with Aaron. The name of the school that you are at will get you internships and it will then get you grad school admissions and/or jobs. Also, my husband went to WashU in St. Louis and, while he enjoyed it there, even he agrees that STL stinks (the city... although the airport ain't so hot, either). Besides, Washington D.C. has better plane spotting!

 

This is true. I've accepted that I am going to have be more proactive when it comes to getting internships.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 15):

Washington and Lee is right out of the picture. Strike that off the list. I've never even heard of it, honestly. EVERYONE has heard of Georgetown.

My advice to you is Georgetown.

Once you make the decision, you will sit back and relax. And congrats, Georgetown is no small achievement, nor is WashU.

And (assuming you're 18 because I'm not a total lech) we (the Pink A.netters) demand a photo of you in your racing suit as payment for my advice.  

Yes, nearly everyone had told me Georgetown, except people who knew a good amount about both schools.

Quoting Flighty (Reply 16):

Harvard won't take wait listers unless you possess some kind of magic I don't know about.

I have pretty much accepted that. The coach has been helping me along the way though, so who knows.

Quoting Flighty (Reply 16):
I would caution harshly against _just_ pandering to name recognition. Clearly Georgetown is the most popular in terms of name recognition. That does not mean it is the best school for you. Don't completely equate "name value" with the real value of this time over the many years of your life. If you go to a place because it is famous, that's a vacuous and circular reason to go there. Knowing a bit more about universities now than I once did, I realize all big research universities are peers, and offer similar opportunities -- whether it is Harvard, UW-Madison, or UC-Boulder.

I agree.

Quoting jcs17 (Reply 18):
No offense, dude, but you realize that 9/10ths of the college grads in the US actually decided on colleges less prestigious than this without the help of a web forum. One thinks you might be gloating.

Nope.

Quoting texan (Reply 20):
The area around Wash U is gorgeous. Forest Park is one of my favorite places in the U.S. to go out and enjoy a day outside. With the light rail stopping right at the school now, you're just a quick trip from sports games (St. Louis is the greatest sports city in the country), shopping, downtown, or the airport.

I actually really like St. Louis. And Wash U is very well known for its business school and law school. A lot of it depends on the career track you might want to follow. I like Wash U and St. Louis because, while the school is an elite school and you do have pressure to perform, I don't get the feeling that the pressure is as intense as on the East Coast.

Yes, I really like Wash U's campus. Hopefully it will be a great experience.

Thanks again for all of your help!


User currently offlineus330 From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 3871 posts, RR: 13
Reply 23, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1117 times:

First, off I realize this is too late, but are you planning on going to grad school after college? Because where you go to undergrad may not matter as much. Second, have you visited the three places and got a feel for them?
If I were you, I''d pick Georgetown--I'm a professional student right now, and can tell you that in terms of off-campus opportunities, DC cannot be beat. It's also a very liveable city.
But you have to live with the decision, so go with your gut.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 15):
). Besides, Washington D.C. has better plane spotting!

Agreed. Georgetown is right under the potomac river visual approach--and during the fall and springtime the place is gorgeous.


User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7780 posts, RR: 16
Reply 24, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1112 times:

Congrats on your choice and best of luck this fall!!

Quoting MHTripple7 (Reply 22):
I decided on Washington University in STL. Despite the fact it doesn't have the brand of Georgetown and is in an "inferior" city

WashU is often overlooked and underrated, but it is my opinion that people who would ultimately be in a position to employ you in the future actually know that WashU is a really good school.

Quoting MHTripple7 (Reply 22):
I liked the overall school, campus, swim team, coaches, and feel the best. Essentially I just went with my gut. I realize that it may be a little harder to get internships, but I think I'll be alright.

Ultimately that is what is most important. Being happy, liking the place = actually doing well. Despite how great a college may be, if you are miserable and getting shitty grades the name brand won't matter.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
25 Ken777 : Congratulations! I hope you have a great experience at University.
26 Post contains images DocLightning : We pink (and female) a.netters are still waiting...
27 tjm321 : Best wishes at WashU - a friend of mine from high school is on their swim team (will be a senior during your first year) and, from what I can tell, ab
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